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Author Topic: Hot Press Paper  (Read 1021 times)

BeaSue

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on: July 25, 2016, 03:00:41 AM
I am currently taking a hyperrealistic watercolor course in which the instructor has us using Hot Press paper. I am finding it very difficult! Do any of you have experience using Hot Press? My first exercise, on Arches 140 lb HP, came out very streaky, and the colors were difficult to blend smoothly on the paper. The instructor suggests using 300 lb HP, so I have ordered some of that.

If you have successfully used HP paper, I'd love to learn some tips. Thanks!
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Steve Weatherwax

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Reply #1 on: July 25, 2016, 06:20:33 AM
Hi, Susan!

I'm not sure how this translates to watercolor, but I was reading another instructor who does hyper-realistic drawings,  and he said he uses the Arches hot pressed 300 GSM for his work. He said, as far as drawing goes, that the back side of the paper is the smoothest.

I purchased some and am very satisfied with it for drawing. I can get very smooth textures. I used it on the two seascape drawings I did. I like it better than the Strathmore Bristol board smooth texture.

As I said, I've only used this for drawing, so I'm not sure how it translates.
Steve W


BeaSue

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Reply #2 on: July 25, 2016, 09:23:24 AM
Steve, thanks for responding. The hot press paper definitely absorbs water differently from the cold press. I'm hoping the 300 lb paper will be a little easier to work with. The course I'm taking is quite fast-paced, and I have to finish assignments quickly, so it may be that I'll be able to do more practicing on my own once the course is over. Heaven knows, I'll have enough hot press paper to do so!
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Tousabella

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Reply #3 on: July 25, 2016, 01:35:41 PM
Gee, Susan, I'm not too swift on hot press, but our "ol gunfighter guru" Dennis has tried it all, and I'm sure he will jump on here and let you know.  He's right up to date with paper..how it's made, what works and what doesn't, and the different weights and processess.  I'm sure he's gonna answer you soon.
I'll keep lookin, too, cuz I'd like to know that answer, also.
Retta

  I can't change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.
                                                    Jimmy Dean


Val

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Reply #4 on: July 25, 2016, 01:44:40 PM
Hi Susan, not sure how much help I will be but I'll let you judge.

While I was up north last year, I did get the chance to try a few different papers at one of the art shops. I did have a go at some Arches 300# HP. I found it very difficult with wet washes (wet in wet), and had it explained to me that this paper is best used for very detailed work where you are using thicker consistencies. I did have a go at a rather sorry looking flower (my painting not the flower), and as far as fine detail with the thicker consistency it was wonderful. The fellow said that with a 'serious amount of practice' I too could learn how to do some of the wetter washes!  :eek:      :2funny:    I mean really.... 'I too?' Sheesh!  :censored:    :2funny:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


John Box

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Reply #5 on: July 25, 2016, 04:06:05 PM
By no means have an expert, but I used the hot press paper for a series of illustrations a few years ago. It works great for pen and wash paintings as a pen will really glide over the paper. I believe the paper is denser than cold press, so the watercolor paint must be applied a bit differently.  :)


BeaSue

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Reply #6 on: July 26, 2016, 04:55:32 AM
Thanks very much for your responses, Retta, Val and John.

Val, I think you're right about using this paper for small, detailed work. I have been taking a look at the process employed by Susan Harrison-Tustain, who does amazing work on HP. Her method is to wet the area you'll be painting, wait for the sheen to go away, then re-wet it and add the paint. I'll do more practice. Honestly, feeling suddenly so inept in a medium I love is most uncomfortable.  :'(
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Val

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Reply #7 on: July 26, 2016, 05:20:49 AM
I know how that feels Susan, to suddenly feel as if everything you thought you knew just doesn't want to work as you know it should.  ??? Extremely frustrating.
After seeing some of the works produced by 'highly' advanced students there, I know that large paintings can be done on that paper.... I just think I'd have to have to live longer than Methuselah to do just one!  :faint:

Don't get disheartened, I know once you get wrapped around the concept and technique you will excel. Give it a bit of time to get to know the characteristics of the paper, you'll figure it out.  O0
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


BeaSue

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Reply #8 on: July 26, 2016, 05:31:30 AM
I know how that feels Susan, to suddenly feel as if everything you thought you knew just doesn't want to work as you know it should.  ??? Extremely frustrating.
After seeing some of the works produced by 'highly' advanced students there, I know that large paintings can be done on that paper.... I just think I'd have to have to live longer than Methuselah to do just one!  :faint:

Don't get disheartened, I know once you get wrapped around the concept and technique you will excel. Give it a bit of time to get to know the characteristics of the paper, you'll figure it out.  O0

 :flowers:
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum




BeaSue

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Reply #10 on: July 30, 2016, 08:37:48 AM
Thanks, Steve! I saw that, too, this week.

Now that I have my 300 lb. hot press paper, I am finding it more forgiving, and easier to work with than the 140 lb HP. But this week's lesson involves a landscape, and I just don't think I would ever be able to do my best landscape work on HP. I'm looking forward, after this class I'm in, to attempting some still life or floral paintings with HP. One can achieve some lovely, crisp edges on it.
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


mea hamo pena

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Reply #11 on: July 30, 2016, 10:45:20 AM
Excellent article, Steve.  I have bookmarked it.

I immediately took a look at the WC block paper I had and found only one labeled 100% pure cotton - that was the ARCHES AQARELLE - 140lb.

I assume then that the blocks I have (Strathmore and the Cotman - both 140lb.) are not pure cotton since I see no mention of "cotton" on the cover.

Wow, there is so much to learn!

aloha

mea
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Val

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Reply #12 on: July 30, 2016, 02:00:15 PM
Good read Steve  :thankyou:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Annie.

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Reply #13 on: August 02, 2016, 09:31:45 PM
 :doh:  and I thought the hot press was more for calligraphy.
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


 

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