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Author Topic: Splattered Paintings  (Read 847 times)

BeaSue

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on: May 29, 2016, 12:17:00 PM
I have noticed that some watercolor artists who paint in a loose style like to splatter their paintings with paint. I don't get it  :confused: I think it makes their painting look messy, and detracts from what they have created.

What do you think?
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Alice L Lemke

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Reply #1 on: May 29, 2016, 02:10:04 PM
Tony Couch uses splatters to indicate texture: he puts it on the roads and it looks like oil spots or gravel, in the trees to indicate leaves, on old boards it looks like age spots, on grass and it turns into seed tops. His philosophy is that the random splashes are attractive and look good anywhere except in the sky. The magic of splatters is in the imagination of the viewer.

The trick is to not let the splashes go overboard. Too many and it starts to look like freckles, or they call attention to themselves. They have to be random or they look like polka-dots, and they have to be carefully placed and used sparingly.

Stan and I remember him talking about splashes as he put them on the painting and looking at it now there are only four places he splattered.


« Last Edit: May 31, 2016, 05:30:46 AM by Alice L Lemke »
"There's no such thing as 'genius,' it's hard work and aptitude!" Ed Whitney quoted by Tony Couch, 2014


Annie.

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Reply #2 on: May 29, 2016, 02:20:34 PM
Interesting topic Sue.  Thank you Alice. 

I first thought it was mostly used for abstract or semi-abstract, or to do gravel road (as in an early oil class from Nolan).
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


BeaSue

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Reply #3 on: May 29, 2016, 03:36:16 PM
I understand splatters (I think) the way someone like Tony Couch uses them, where they are somewhat representational, but the last one I saw, for example, was a lovely loose painting of a hare that was, in my opinion, ruined by splatters all over it.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2016, 05:23:06 AM by BeaSue »
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Annie.

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Reply #4 on: May 29, 2016, 05:44:55 PM
Can you gave us the reference if on the internet?  Maybe it is a good thing pushed too far, or used inappropriately.
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


BeaSue

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Reply #5 on: May 29, 2016, 05:59:04 PM
Annie, it was a painting of a hare on the Facebook group, Photos for Artists. I'm not sure I have permission to show it here, as this is a closed group, but if I find another one I will show you.
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


BeaSue

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Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 05:25:38 AM
I found an art site where she displays her paintings. I do rather like the whimsical, colorful ones. The splattered ones, not so much.


https://www.artfinder.com/artist/sarah-weyman/artworks/category/all-artworks/
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Annie.

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Reply #7 on: May 30, 2016, 05:36:24 AM
I see what you mean.  I prefer the paintings I see on PB  ;)
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


Alice L Lemke

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Reply #8 on: May 30, 2016, 01:31:30 PM
You are right, those by Sarah White are very loose and sketchy looking. I think she puts the sloppy splashes on to add interest in the otherwise blank areas around the subject. I agree, they don't look right, like having splashes in the sky. I don't like the way she allowed the drips to run up the paper off the top of the chicken's heads.

On the last day of a Tony Couch workshop he goes over how to do a vignette painting, which is what Sarah is doing in those animal paintings. The runs and drips and splashes are sometimes spontaneous and left on, and sometimes you might want to control them, depending on where they go. Sorry I keep talking about Tony, but he's really spoiled me for every other workshop and teacher. He is a master at explaining - even Stephen Quiller couldn't hold a candle to him.


In a well designed vignette, the painting runs off the page in about four places - all should be different widths and at different places on the sides. Try not to center in the middle of the side and usually follow the Golden Mean rule.  This anchors the image in the frame of the paper.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2016, 05:42:41 AM by Alice L Lemke »
"There's no such thing as 'genius,' it's hard work and aptitude!" Ed Whitney quoted by Tony Couch, 2014


Happychappy

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Reply #9 on: May 30, 2016, 03:10:10 PM
Susan, I totally agree with your view about splatters. Like you, I think they make the painting look messy and wishy washy. In fact, I always used to think that watercolour paintings were just that, wishy washy, until I joined PB and saw that it was not so but that it was up to the artist as to how they wanted to use the watercolours and that it could be vibrant and detailed.


Patricia
Patricia
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Val

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Reply #10 on: May 31, 2016, 06:06:26 AM
I think in the end it really comes down to a matter of preference. I have seen splatter used very effectively to indicate rain and a number of other things. The trick is to know how much, where, and when to use the technique.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Happychappy

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Reply #11 on: May 31, 2016, 03:23:52 PM
You have a very good point there Val ... if the technique is used properly, it can enhance a painting but looking at huge blobs of splashes all over the place makes it so untidy and unappealing to my mind.  Patricia
Patricia
Blessed are those who give without remembering and blessed are those who receive without forgetting - anonymous


KathyKuz

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Reply #12 on: June 03, 2016, 03:23:25 PM
Sue:  I agree with you about the spatter.  A little goes a long way.  I did a workshop with Tony Couch many years ago and did not enjoy it.
Kathy


Annie.

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Reply #13 on: June 03, 2016, 03:33:35 PM
Nolan used 'controlled' splatter to do a rock bed under water and also a pathways in 2 early oil classes.  The results is amazingly realistic and to be honest, it was rather fun do do.  But those are examples where the slatter technique is used to represent real objects and not a random slatter all over a finished painting.  Dennis also have a similar example in a beginner WC class.
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


 

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