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Author Topic: Maltesers drawing  (Read 2147 times)

Cheryl Carberry

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on: May 14, 2016, 10:55:53 PM
This is my first proper coloured pencil drawing on Bristol Vellum. Hubby bought me some Faber Castell Polychromos for my birthday! I thought I was clever by taking my own picture of a pack of Maltesers for my drawing attempt. Should be easier than portraits and other pictures I've seen before....? Yeah, right!  ::)


Oh, ...my...word! It was a great learning curve as I have never worked with solvent for blending either. I used a grid method to draw out my picture.

First thing I've learnt: it took much longer than I thought (compared to the acrylic lessons I've had with Paintbasket!  :o)
Second thing: Don't use solvent too early. It saved a lot of time trying to layer a few layers first (dark enough) before the first solvent blending is done.

I do have a question to those who have more experience: when using solvent to blend, do your pigments/colours also "move" around? You almost end up with lighter and darker areas in an area where you have started off with one shade.

Now I need to practise more to master the pencils and solvent!




Please advise if I should make changes or fix errors.  :)
« Last Edit: May 14, 2016, 11:35:57 PM by Cheryl Carberry »
"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential, is invisible to the eye" - The Little Prince


Val

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Reply #1 on: May 15, 2016, 05:15:04 AM
 :heeha:  Brilliant job Cheryl !      Haven't seen or tasted these is sooooo long!  Let the cravings begin! 
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


BeaSue

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Reply #2 on: May 15, 2016, 05:21:07 AM
You did this so well, Cheryl!  :smitten:

Yes, isn't it crazy how long it takes to create a painting in CP? I think you're right about not going to the solvent too soon. One of my books on CP art suggests using a colorless blender (pencil) first, and then adding more layers before using the solvent. I haven't noticed the colors "moving around" when I've used solvent. Perhaps it has something to do with how much solvent you are using? What are you applying it with? I use a paper stump or tortillion. When I tried using a Q-tip, I found I was getting too much solvent on the paper.

Keep at it! You're doing great!
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


mea hamo pena

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Reply #3 on: May 15, 2016, 08:03:54 AM
Cheryl,

If that third photo is your work and not the reference photo, you have done a marvelous job.

Wven the middle photo of the partially done piece looks really good!

aloha

mea
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Maryna

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Reply #4 on: May 15, 2016, 08:29:42 AM
Wow excellent work, well done  :clap: :clap:
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Steve Weatherwax

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Reply #5 on: May 15, 2016, 10:37:14 AM
Beautiful job, Cheryl! :clap::clap::clap:

Just out of curiosity, how long did it take to complete?
Steve W


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #6 on: May 15, 2016, 07:40:54 PM
 :heeha: Cheryl,

This is amazing. I thought your drawing was your reference photo!  :clap: I have a bunch of watercolor pencils and colored pencils. I am looking forward to playing with them after I get more watercolor and drawing classes under my belt.
Kathy S.


jillh

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Reply #7 on: May 16, 2016, 02:59:21 PM
Excellent Cheryl!  I found when I was playing around, that if my brush was too wet with solvent, the colors moved.
Jill
"What is easy to do is also easy not to do.  That's the difference between success and failure, between daydreams and ambitions"


Danielle123

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Reply #8 on: May 16, 2016, 04:13:18 PM
Cheryl that is awsome.  :yippee:
Danielle
Pourquoi remettre à plus tard ce qu'on peut faire aujourd'hui?
Why put off until tomorrow  what you can do today.


nolan

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Reply #9 on: May 17, 2016, 02:04:49 AM
excellent :congrats:


JayJ

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Reply #10 on: May 17, 2016, 03:28:11 AM
Amazing!
Zayn


Cheryl Carberry

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Reply #11 on: May 17, 2016, 09:24:27 PM
Thank you very much everyone!  :hug:

Susan and Jill, I think you might be right about me using too much solvent! Someone suggested that I first dab my paintbrush on a papertowel after dipping it in the solvent and use the semi-dry brush on my picture. I'll have to experiment with that, but too much solvent seems to be the general consensus and I'm glad I have some direction with regards to that, thanks again!

Steve, I haven't really timed myself and should actually, but it took a few days. I must admit that I did little bits at a time when I got a chance, but I will actually write down times, also for me to guage how much time to set a side for different types of tasks. I kept missing the ease and speed of acrylic painting, but there were some things I've learnt that I could apply in the drawing (especially the colour wheel)!  ;)

My photo of my final drawing came out a little darker (it was taken in the evening with no light shining through the window and with my camera!) than my w.i.p. photos (which was taken with my cellphone with light coming through the window. It made quite a difference. I will keep that constant next time if I want to show progress.

You guys ask very interesting questions which made me think!  ;) And that is a good thing which will make me concentrate and focus on some small things!

Thanks for the learning curve!  :yippee:

"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential, is invisible to the eye" - The Little Prince


Steve Weatherwax

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Reply #12 on: May 18, 2016, 04:23:29 AM
Thanks for the info, Cheryl. I was only looking for a general timeframe... like days or weeks.

I once saw a video where the artist put her solvent in a container along with a cotton ball. She used a stump to apply the solvent and loaded it by touching the stump to the cotton ball; not by directly dipping it. Worth a try?
Steve W


Danielle123

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Reply #13 on: May 18, 2016, 04:31:17 AM
I had not read the whole post when commenting on your great drawing . Here is what I do. When using the solvent you should start with the lightest to darker colours and clean the brush after each colour or what ever you use. I use a paint brush and it works well for me, after dipping it in solvent i dab it on a tissue.
You do have to put quite a few layers of colours before using the solvent.  It is a fun medium but it does take a lot of hours unlike watercolours.   
Danielle
Pourquoi remettre à plus tard ce qu'on peut faire aujourd'hui?
Why put off until tomorrow  what you can do today.


Cheryl Carberry

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Reply #14 on: May 19, 2016, 11:34:26 PM
Thank you very much, Steve and Danielle! I will definitely try both your suggestions out!
Steve, I think what saved me some time, was the fact that I had no background. I can imagine it will take quite a few days if I do not at least put in a few hours' work per day.
"It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential, is invisible to the eye" - The Little Prince


 

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