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Author Topic: Perspective and vanishing points  (Read 2021 times)

nolan

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Reply #15 on: March 09, 2016, 12:12:24 PM
great job on the perspective work and thanks for the great instruction Robert :yippee: :yippee: :yippee:


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #16 on: March 09, 2016, 11:22:42 PM
I decided to try to draw the building Nolan taught in the Perspective lesson.  I feel so much better about it this time.  The concept is making much more sense to me now. I am so appreciative of the help and encouragement to learn this.  :thankyou: Thank you Paint Basket friends  :flowers:

Kathy S.


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #17 on: March 10, 2016, 04:15:41 AM
To quote a line from "My Fair Lady"... By George, I think she's got it!" WELL DONE!
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Happychappy

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Reply #18 on: March 10, 2016, 07:09:19 AM
 :clap: :clap: :clap: Fantastic, Kathy, you have 'got it'.  Great determination which is wonderful.   Patricia
Patricia
Blessed are those who give without remembering and blessed are those who receive without forgetting - anonymous


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #19 on: March 10, 2016, 07:33:01 AM
To quote a line from "My Fair Lady"... By George, I think she's got it!" WELL DONE!

 :thankyou: Thank you so much, Robert, for the instruction and encouragement. It made so much more sense to me after you and Val gave me the tools to grasp the concept.

So here is my next question. (Warning: I never run out of questions  :o) If I am popping in a building like this into a drawing, how do I find my vanishing points without having a bunch of lines going through the rest of my drawing.

 :) BTW, "Mary Fair Lady" is one of my all time favorite movies!  :)
Kathy S.


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #20 on: March 10, 2016, 07:35:59 AM
:clap: :clap: :clap: Fantastic, Kathy, you have 'got it'.  Great determination which is wonderful.   Patricia

 :thankyou: Thank you,Patricia.  I really appreciate you and your encouraging support.  :flowers:
Kathy S.


nolan

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Reply #21 on: March 10, 2016, 01:31:35 PM
your building is spot on, well done :yippee: :yippee: :yippee:


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #22 on: March 10, 2016, 02:08:21 PM
your building is spot on, well done :yippee: :yippee: :yippee:

Thank you, Nolan. Between the great lessons you teach and the forum of wonderful people, what was once unreachable for me now makes sense. I can draw! :yippee:
Kathy S.


Annie.

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Reply #23 on: March 10, 2016, 05:51:36 PM
There is not doubt that you can draw.   And you draw very well  :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #24 on: March 10, 2016, 07:54:07 PM
There is not doubt that you can draw.   And you draw very well  :clap: :clap:

Awe, thank you, Annie!   :-*  truly, these classes and this forum have led the way for me to learn.   :hug:

How I wish my mom was alive to see and share this with as she was an incredible artist. I would have loved to introduce her to PB. She would have adored Dennis's work as she painted mostly animals from Africa and ocean life.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2016, 10:39:15 PM by Kathysutterlin »
Kathy S.


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #25 on: March 11, 2016, 06:16:31 AM
concerning your question about the "lines"... eventually, and it may take time, but eventually, you'll unconsciously see those lines while drawing freehand, and no longer need them as they become part of your "muscle memory" in much the same way as the skull formation, facial muscles and facial proportion are remembered while drawing or painting a portrait.

I cannot help but urge everyone to take the time and recreate interior aspects of a head (minus the brain of course) over and over and over until you find yourself including them without ever thinking about what you're doing. With perspective (all three points) the same applies.

Think of it this way, unconsciously, you know how to use a fork or spoon, and how many of us actually think about the mechanics involved... (eg) using your opposable thumb while grasping the utensil with just the right amount of force not to bend it or to drop it, your wrist manipulation, the degree of strength needed to cradle and pick up that item of ingestion, the names of the actual muscles used from your shoulder, elbow, forearm to precisely position the fork or spoon in front of your mouth... and consider how you have to adapt these motions while under water or in outer space... the point being that we all practiced these simple motions over and over again as children and eventually stopped dropping food on our clothes or on the table even though much later in life we learned that we didn't really drop it, gravity pulled it down ( :2funny:).

What I am trying to emphasize is that repeating and repeating regardless of the accuracy of the attempt will eventually lead to performing it as naturally as if you were born with the skill. So Kathy, eventually you'll see those vanishing point lines in your "mind's eye" and will no longer need to draw them. But until this happens, make sure they are very very lightly drawn so you can easily erase them without damaging your paper or drawing. If you intend to color it in with water colors, this very light touch creating the VP lines makes erasing extremely important to also be as light.
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #26 on: March 11, 2016, 02:23:32 PM
concerning your question about the "lines"... eventually, and it may take time, but eventually, you'll unconsciously see those lines while drawing freehand, and no longer need them as they become part of your "muscle memory" in much the same way as the skull formation, facial muscles and facial proportion are remembered while drawing or painting a portrait.

I cannot help but urge everyone to take the time and recreate interior aspects of a head (minus the brain of course) over and over and over until you find yourself including them without ever thinking about what you're doing. With perspective (all three points) the same applies.

Think of it this way, unconsciously, you know how to use a fork or spoon, and how many of us actually think about the mechanics involved... (eg) using your opposable thumb while grasping the utensil with just the right amount of force not to bend it or to drop it, your wrist manipulation, the degree of strength needed to cradle and pick up that item of ingestion, the names of the actual muscles used from your shoulder, elbow, forearm to precisely position the fork or spoon in front of your mouth... and consider how you have to adapt these motions while under water or in outer space... the point being that we all practiced these simple motions over and over again as children and eventually stopped dropping food on our clothes or on the table even though much later in life we learned that we didn't really drop it, gravity pulled it down ( :2funny:).

What I am trying to emphasize is that repeating and repeating regardless of the accuracy of the attempt will eventually lead to performing it as naturally as if you were born with the skill. So Kathy, eventually you'll see those vanishing point lines in your "mind's eye" and will no longer need to draw them. But until this happens, make sure they are very very lightly drawn so you can easily erase them without damaging your paper or drawing. If you intend to color it in with water colors, this very light touch creating the VP lines makes erasing extremely important to also be as light.

Thank you Robert! Great analogy of the fork and spoon. It's amazing to think of all the details of sight and movement we perform for a simple action. Muscle memory is a concept I do understand. It's like learning to ride a bike, playing a musical instrument, performing an athletic movement. Now I see that the same concept will work to learn these wonderful aspects of art.

I'm not ready, yet, for portraits. When I am, I will certainly follow your advice to draw the skeletal aspects to learn the shapes and proportions. I thank you for your willingness to share your experience and teach us through the forum.  :thankyou:

You have not posted much of your own work. I'd love to see some of it if you care to post it. Your Christmas Eve painting is beautiful.  :painting:

Kathy S.


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #27 on: March 12, 2016, 07:28:04 AM
Since almost everything I create is for others- authors, and my weekly cartooning for the Credit Union Times on-line and print magazines, these images are copyrighted by them and therefore do not enter the public domain without their permission, it would be unfair and somewhat unprofessional for me to post even my rough drafts for others to see without first checking with them.

 Recently, I illustrated two great children's books "Charlie in Fraction City" by Lynda Brennan and "What's An Adventure Without Milk and Cookies" by Rick Bivins. You might google these titles or visit my web site to see sample pages. Also, since, these days, I rarely paint anything larger than 11"x17", if you really want to see one of my very best canvas paintings -  a 40"x30" seascape, it's also presented on my web site and is for sale (in the realm of shameless self-promotion) if you know of anyone needing a seascape (especially if they're old school Republican)  :2funny:

I don't know the rules for posting links to personal web sites in a reply, but assume it's frowned upon. But I think there's a link to    >:D     yourbasicwebpage  (my company's web site's name) with the added forward slash art which goes directly to the art side of my activities..... somewhere in my profile here.

But rest assured, should something come up where a student here needs an example or encouragement, I'll post something visual.
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #28 on: March 12, 2016, 08:13:28 AM
Good morning Robert,

  I found your website! I am speechless (that doesn't happen often).  :heeha:

Your work is amazing. It is so diverse. Many of your paintings look like photographs. I love your tribute to the fallen soldiers. Such a gift you imparted to their families.

I love the children's books, animal drawings, the medical illustration. It just goes on and on.  The amount of work on your website is huge! You have quite a busy career.

 :congrats:  :clap: :yippee:
« Last Edit: March 12, 2016, 08:18:22 AM by Kathysutterlin »
Kathy S.


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #29 on: March 12, 2016, 04:50:27 PM
Again... Shameless self promotion...... if you really want to know the extent of my career which started in 1965, and have an ebook reader, go back to my web site,click on the Amazon link, invest $2.99 and I sincerely hope you'll enjoy reading "Painting on Sunday at Walker's Point". The first chapter will astound you concerning portrait painting.......  and between you and I and everyone here, it's a true story! :thankyou:
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


 

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