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Author Topic: Perspective and vanishing points  (Read 2019 times)

Kathysutterlin

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on: March 02, 2016, 09:11:46 PM
I decided to start the new thread on Perspective drawing. Val, is it possible to move the other posts on this topic from my "Let's Draw" thread?
I think I'm getting better at this. It took much less time to do this sheet tonight. The information and examples from Val and Robert helped a lot! At some point I may be able to do something like your paint can, mea. Not yet. I know this is very basic here but baby steps will get me to toddler, then to adolescence, and hopefully perspective "maturity" some day.  :D :2funny: :D

Previous examples from Kathy's thread.

This drawing is Val's example. It was very helpful to get me started on my own.  :thankyou: Val!

  This just gives you the basic starting point. From here you can see how it works and practice and apply it to any object/subject you wish to draw.



Well done! There you go Kathy, you now have the basics. Anything you want to draw can now be done in perspective by applying your newfound knowledge....  Of course there are times you may require more multiple VPs, but you'll grow into that.  ;)    :clap: :clap: :clap:
« Last Edit: March 03, 2016, 08:47:11 PM by Kathysutterlin »
Kathy S.


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Reply #1 on: March 02, 2016, 10:04:33 PM
KathyS

I admire your determination to get comfortable with this.  The paint can was easy compared to what you are doing.

Will be interested to see how this all turns out.

aloha

mea
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Kathysutterlin

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Reply #2 on: March 02, 2016, 10:10:27 PM
 :thankyou: Thank you, mea. After all the years that I believed that I could not draw, I want to absorb everything I can. This is a whole new and exciting adventure.   :)
Kathy S.


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Reply #3 on: March 03, 2016, 04:47:47 AM
I created a new folder in my profile labeled perspective. I really didn't want them to be on the front page of the site but am still fumbling with how to post images. But, that said, feel free to view them at your leisure. While solid objects in perspective are very good exercises, no one buys a painting of just objects (well then there's abstracts which I have failed my entire life to comprehend.
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Val

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Reply #4 on: March 03, 2016, 06:38:01 AM
Here's a link that Nina found. Covers 1, 2, and 3 point perspective quite nicely.

http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2013/08/three-point-perspective/
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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Kathysutterlin

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Reply #5 on: March 03, 2016, 08:38:57 AM
I created a new folder in my profile labeled perspective. I really didn't want them to be on the front page of the site but am still fumbling with how to post images. But, that said, feel free to view them at your leisure. While solid objects in perspective are very good exercises, no one buys a painting of just objects (well then there's abstracts which I have failed my entire life to comprehend.

 :thankyou: Thank you for posting your prospective drawings Robert. They are very helpful. Having struggled the last couple of days has already taught me a lot. Looking at your detailed and complex perspective drawings actually makes sense to me now.  :yippee: I am no where near creating anything like them yet but at least I get it now. Thank you for your help in my journey of understanding.

As for posting media to the front page, I agree. I REALLY did not want my rough practice pages on the front page but don't know any other way to get them into my posts. If anyone knows a way to get images to posts without having them on the front page, please advise.   :)
Kathy S.


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #6 on: March 03, 2016, 08:41:33 AM
Here's a link that Nina found. Covers 1, 2, and 3 point perspective quite nicely.

http://www.craftsy.com/blog/2013/08/three-point-perspective/


 :thankyou: Thank you Val for the link and for moving the images for me.  :-*
Kathy S.


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Reply #7 on: March 03, 2016, 10:04:31 AM
You're entirely welcome Kathy. Keep at it.
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #8 on: March 03, 2016, 02:22:42 PM
I am posting Robert's post on perspective that was originally posted on my "let's Draw" thread as I feel his information is valuable to this new thread:

Kathy,
I will begin this discussion, first with a caution note... perspective (which you are attempting with the above drawing) does not mean that you pick out points from which to take a ruler and draw them towards you... rather they are drawn from your object outward towards a distant region you have determined as your vanishing point.Others may wish to join in and I urge you pay attention and read this rather long entry slowly and make notes, because this material is not only absolutely essential for anyone wishing to portray buildings or forms realistically, but it is also difficult for any art student to comprehend completely, due to the complexity of the subject. I have taken years of trial and error to become the photo realistic illustrator I have become, and sense, perhaps erroneously, that your practice of three dimensional rectangles is a precursor to portraying a building or some other solid object.

Including perspective is also in the realm of architecture and drafting rather than in the “easier” (my words) drawing and painting. For those of you who want to include a building correctly, from scratch, this is an important and vital lesson and I applaud Kathy for attempting to understand it. If you don’t feel the need to understand what is involved, I suggest tracing or transferring a google image of a building or a rectangle onto your canvas and coloring it in as many grammar school students do. Don’t get me wrong, nor be offended, because even I sometimes do exactly that when speed is needed to reach a deadline or I just feel lazy.

Ok, here goes. When any of us draw or paint a building as part of a composition, we use “perspective”. A perspective drawing is similar to a photograph because it shows the object as it appears to the eye of the observer. A camera lens, like the human eye, is constructed so that the image of an object viewed through it, appears smaller as the viewed object moves away from the lens, by means of distance. Follow me so far? In other words, the farther away an aspect of a building is from you, the smaller it will be. But again, the object is viewed from your eye first and recedes to the farthest point of your composition. Kathy, it seems to me that you drew your visual rays from the vanishing points first and constructed your rectangles from their intersection, but I could be wrong and if so, I apologize.

I repeat. Representing a cube, or a solid rectangle or a building in perspective is based on the fact that all lines extending from the viewer appear to come together or to converge at some distant point. For example, to a person sighting down a long stretch of railroad tracks, the tracks will appear to merge or “vanish” at a single point far in the distance.  Stop reading, we've all see this in nature... a line of fences, a straight road which appears to narrow as we drive towards a destination. Back to the railroad tracks and imagine this, please.

The spacing between the horizontal railroad ties diminishes with distance. The rails, spread very far apart closest to you, narrow and eventually seem to blend as they approach the horizon. Do you see it? Good.That's single point perspective.

Now, breathe.

I will use the following terms in this discussion of perspective drawing. Please, please, please, take the time to become familiar with each term and it’s definition. A perspective drawing involves four main elements. 1. The observer (or viewer’s) eye. 2. The object being viewed. 3. The plane of projection. 4. The projectors from the observer’s eye to all points of the object.

For the sake of brevity, I will start with ELEVATION and mean specifically the front and side views of any solid rectangle.

PICTURE PLANE (PP) – This is the imaginary vertical plane placed between the eye of the viewer and the object being drawn. For instance, if you placed a piece of glass between your eye and the building you wish to draw, you could trace all the visual edges of the object onto the glass. Although impractical, it does illustrate some principles of perspective. In real life, your paper becomes the plane of glass; instead of tracing your drawing, you project it onto the paper.

STATION POINT(SP)- This represents the position of the viewer’s eye. It is one of the most important items in perspective drawing because the station point greatly influences the perspective of the drawing. If you can imagine looking straight ahead, as most beginners do, those train tracks would begin at the center of the bottom of the paper and vanish somewhere in the exact center of the paper. Eventually, you might try to show the building as if you were looking at it from the extreme left or right of the building, which would give your viewer’s an interesting painting, and if so, you will need to learn a great deal more about perspective drawing.

VANISHING POINT (VP)- This is known as the center of vision (CV) and is the point at which all horizontal lines seem to converge. As indicated by their names, the number of vanishing points constitutes the type of perspective drawing you are going to attempt. That is, one-point or parallel perspective has one vanishing point; two-point or angular perspective has two VPs; which is what I believe Kathy is trying to practice, and three-point (sometimes called triple-point or oblique) perspective has three vanishing points.

HORIZONTAL LINE (HL)- This is also known as eye level. The position of the horizon- that may or may not be visible on the picture plane, ( it may be behind a mountain or a stand of trees in your drawing) but which also depends on your chosen angle of sight (or the SP) and remember it does exist even if you can't see it.

GROUND LINE (GL)- This represents the edge of the ground plane on which the object rests. It represents the lower limit of your perspective drawing.

And finally, VISUAL RAYS (VR). These are the projectors from the points or edges of the object to the vanishing point(s). The visual rays seem to converge at the vanishing point(s).

This is a lot for anyone to digest, but Kathy you made a good start at reviewing two point perspective with your drawing. The internet is full of treatises by others much more learned than me, some even have movies showing a step by step process which might help you far better than I to grasp perspective drawing. I merely wanted to review with you the basics. Whether you are practicing single point, double point, or triple point, they must include an appreciation of the PP, SP, VP, HL, GL and just as importantly, the VRs. This is especially true when you wish to draw a reflection or a shadow.

Hope this helps...
Robert
Kathy S.


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #9 on: March 03, 2016, 02:26:14 PM
These are some of Robert's drawings on perspective. Thank you, Robert, for sharing them.
Kathy S.


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Reply #10 on: March 03, 2016, 03:19:17 PM
Thank you Kathy :thankyou: for reposting this information for everyone to view and use.
I'm finding that technology is passing by me faster than a speeding bullet. Thank goodness for pencils because if I can no longer afford electricity, I can always revert to pencil and paper to earn a living.

Keep practicing. and as according to everything I've read... Michaelangelo was taught... to draw something every day without fail.
Robert
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


Kathysutterlin

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Reply #11 on: March 03, 2016, 10:04:41 PM
 :thankyou: Val and Nina for the link to Craftsy for 1,2,&3 point perspective. I did this 3 point following instruction from that link. Again, my drawing is very basic but I'm expanding  :D. I will be ready to try my hand at Nolan's building soon.  I'm going to go on to my still life lesson and then come back to this.  :)
Kathy S.


Val

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Reply #12 on: March 04, 2016, 04:09:38 AM
 O0
Cheers, Val

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Reply #13 on: March 04, 2016, 07:12:07 AM
KathyS,

You are really getting goodn at thie perspective stuff.

aloha

mea
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Val

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Reply #14 on: March 04, 2016, 03:49:30 PM
To coin a phrase from Dennis.... Slowly, slowly catchee monkey!  ;D
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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