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Author Topic: Watercolour Tips  (Read 2268 times)

dennis

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on: July 11, 2010, 11:20:08 PM
Containers for Watercolour Washes



Most artists have colour printers nowadays. If you don't, then perhaps you know of someone who does. Many manufacturers protect their cartridges with plastic covers when shipping them. Instead of throwing them away, put them to good use.

Prestik (Bostik) or glue these printer ink cartridge plastic protection covers to a board. This works especially handy when you are on holiday as you can stack these covers inside each other to save space.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 12:48:36 AM by dennis »
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dennis

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Reply #1 on: July 11, 2010, 11:20:39 PM
Watercolour Half-pan Holders



Prestik (Bostik / Bluetac) your loose ½ pans into an old plastic tooth brush packaging as shown above. Alternatively obtain a shallow plastic container with a lid and prestik them in there. Loose ½ pans have a habit of getting damaged or lost, but now you will know where they are.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 12:48:18 AM by dennis »
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dennis

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Reply #2 on: July 11, 2010, 11:21:26 PM
Application of Masking Fluid

Looking through the various art magazines through the years has amazed me with all the types of advice given (some good and some very bad!!). - Don't do this! Don't do that! Use only your oldest brush and then throw it away! Why throw them away? Why use only your oldest brush? I've been using the same brush for painting and applying masking fluid for approx. 30 years! In fact, I use any of my brushes, even the expensive ones, and NEVER have I thrown one away because of the masking fluid. How do I do it?

If you dip your brush as it is in masking fluid then surely you are going to have a problem. The fluid gets in between the hairs, and being rubber based, will cement all the hairs together and render the brush useless. To rectify this you can dissolve the dried masking fluid in Lacquer Thinners for a while and then carefully wiping the dissolved rubber mess away. Do this several times until the brush is restored to its original condition. Clean carefully right up the metal ferrule.

This is how I operated for approx 20 years with the same brush. But why suffer all this inconvenience when there is a better way?

During 1991 I attended one of Dale Elliott's watercolour holidays where he showed us his method. The trick is in a bar of Sunlight Green Soap (used for handwashing of clothes).



Wet the brush thoroughly and work up a rich lather with the brush. Work it up until the lather becomes rather thick and sticky. Be sure the lather is worked thoroughly into the hairs and right up to just past the ferrule.



It is now ready to insert into the masking fluid. You may now apply the fluid to your painting as necessary. Be careful not to paint too long with the treated brush as the soap gets gradually worked away during the painting process. Rather frequently wash the brush in water and then treat the brush again and again with the soap lather. If you happen to accidentally dip the untreated brush into the masking fluid, simply wash it straight away in the water. If you forget to re-treat the brush in time, quickly soak the brush in Lacquer Thinners.

By the way: Don't forget to clean the cap of the masking fluid bottle. Remove ALL remains of the rubberized strips in the cap otherwise small gaps will occur in which air can penetrate into the bottle causing the entire fluid to solidify!
« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 12:49:14 AM by dennis »
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #3 on: December 18, 2016, 03:13:28 AM
Came across this lovely gem while searching for some info and thought this may be of help to some of our 'new to the puddle' watercolourists! Also a good refresher for some of us 'older' puddle jumpers!  :2funny:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Happychappy

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Reply #4 on: December 18, 2016, 05:13:30 AM
 :thankyou: :thankyou:  Val, you are a star and thank you Dennis for this information.  It is always so nice to learn the tricks of the trade so to speak. 


Patricia
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mea hamo pena

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Reply #5 on: December 18, 2016, 07:30:43 AM
Thanks, Val and Dennis.  I do not have access to the green soap, but have been doing the same thing with good-old IVORY soap since I started doing art in 2013.  And yes, I have used the same bristle brush (marked FOR MASKING FLUID) all that time.

aloha

mea
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Straynative

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Reply #6 on: January 17, 2017, 09:02:48 AM
Thanks Dennis,

Your soap method has worked a charm for me since I started with you guys. Then again when I started I had no clue about anything lol. Thanks for ALL the great tips you have instilled. I am only really now feeling fairly confident in watercolours and related materials. My biggest key to advancing has been to understand pigment to water ratios whilst painting at various stages. I really battled in the beginning with this and it caused all sorts of issues. Now for the most part i get the ratios right.

I do sometimes find my washes dry to quickly even when im trying to work rapidly, especially on the bigger paintings. Ive read that this is probably due to a warmer climate which makes sense. This can be frustrating when I dont want hard edges and when using transparent staining colours youre finished, as they cant really be scrubbed away.

Any advice on trying to keep the paint "wet" for longer would be most welcome,

Be well everyone
Trev


Val

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Reply #7 on: January 17, 2017, 10:20:54 AM
Hi Trev, I took a tip from the acrylic paints. I have a very fine atomizer bottle, and spray over the area I want to keep open longer. It's a bit trickier than acrylics. Keep the bottle high enough so that just the lightest spray lands on the paper. Being here in the Caribbean countries, this is a serious lifesaver for me. Hope it helps.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Straynative

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Reply #8 on: January 17, 2017, 11:29:58 AM
 :thankyou: Val! I have tried that but I must have been going wrong is most probably not allowing the "bottle high enough so that just the lightest spray lands on the paper." Ive obviously been spraying too close to the paper and that has caused mini cauliflowers. The key is just a light mist! thanks I will definitely try that. If it doesnt work my atomiser is probably not fine enough...

 :thankyou: Val  ;)

(lucky bum in the Caribbean mon!)
Trev


Val

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Reply #9 on: January 17, 2017, 02:55:01 PM
 :doh: The other thing I learned was starting at the top and keeping that water bead alive as you go down.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Alice L Lemke

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Reply #10 on: February 06, 2017, 07:11:45 PM
I don't know if it's just me, but I can't see any of the photos. All I can see is the broken link image. I hope you can fix this as I would really like to see what everyone is talking about!

I have a little 1/2 bar of old-fashioned hotel soap that I use with my my masking fluid, and it works just as well. I think it may be an antique itself, from the 1970s. At this rate it may last me forever.

"There's no such thing as 'genius,' it's hard work and aptitude!" Ed Whitney quoted by Tony Couch, 2014


dennis

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Reply #11 on: February 07, 2017, 11:45:05 AM
Alice, no, it is not you  ;)

Those photos were on the very original paintbasket site of many years ago. At the change-over many of the photos got "lost".

In this thread, the containers mentioned do not exist any more. It is on my list for some time now to redo the photos but just have not found the time to do it. Hopefully in the near future.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


 

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