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Author Topic: The 3 P's of Painting (4 actually)  (Read 2776 times)

Val

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on: September 24, 2011, 05:23:24 AM
It's all quite simple really.....

Practice + Perseverence =Progress

and finally #4 which may be the most important..... one must actually  :painting:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


smokie55

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Reply #1 on: September 24, 2011, 05:50:20 AM
Val, I have a hurdle right now. I have visions in my head ( oh no), And I know what they should look like going onto the canvas. But for some reason I am questioning my skills to make it happen. I have been fearful of wasting paint and canvas I guess. I should just go for it, and see what happens. that would be the practice. I try to remember what Dennis says. Not every painting will be a masterpiece. I have always had a problem trying to paint the details as I go. That is the way I draw also. I really need to break out of this mold and get flowing.

Maybe I need to break some eggs to get this omelet cooking. ;)
Will Evans


thegrindre

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Reply #2 on: September 24, 2011, 07:16:45 AM
Gee, Smokie, buy yourself the cheap stuff first. Use it for practicing. That's what I'm doing and not worrying about the cost.
Micheal's is selling canvases for a buck a piece. Jerry's is selling paint for a buck a piece... Go for it.  ;)
(I am right now as a beginner to all this.)
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


nolan

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Reply #3 on: September 24, 2011, 01:22:09 PM
 :smart:


Val

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Reply #4 on: September 25, 2011, 03:09:52 AM
I understand where you're at Smokie... I must confess...I was a detailaholic. I know, hard to believe. I had so many unfinished drawings because I tried to put everything in right from the start. I thought to myself, I know what this looks like, which of course it didn't when I drew it...not really any surprise there. If we could do that we'd all be Michealangelos and DaVincis! Like most things in life we need to get the basics down first, then build the picture one step at a time. It took me a while to break down the picture instead of 'seeing' it complete. I know that is what stopped me cold on the iguana. The detail...how will I ever replicate it all? RED LIGHT wait, I'm not trying to 'replicate', I'm making a likeness. Once I started 'taking' away the detail, I realized all I need is a series of colour washes, and indicate the detail. Now the basics are done, I can play about and add as much or little detail as I like. The clouds have parted and the sun is shining through! Things are only as difficult as we wish to make them.
Now stop lollygagging and hop to it!  :2funny:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #5 on: September 25, 2011, 11:01:36 AM
great advice Val  :smart:


dennis

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Reply #6 on: September 25, 2011, 11:49:17 AM
Quote
Once I started 'taking' away the detail, I realized all I need is a series of colour washes, and indicate the detail. Now the basics are done, I can play about and add as much or little detail as I like. The clouds have parted and the sun is shining through! Things are only as difficult as we wish to make them.

Now this is what I have been advocating on this forum right from the very beginning  :clap: :clap: EUREKA  :yippee:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #7 on: September 25, 2011, 05:46:13 PM
Thank you Nolan.  :wave:
I know Dennis...it just took me a bit to sort it through. I swear, sometimes you two must think you're talking to a wall!  :2funny: Do us a favour...keep talking!  :smiley6600:  :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


dennis

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Reply #8 on: September 25, 2011, 07:30:32 PM
That was general advice. Definitely will keep on talking as I can see vast improvements happening all over.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #9 on: September 26, 2011, 02:16:43 AM
 :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


smokie55

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Reply #10 on: September 26, 2011, 05:44:56 AM
I am going to make a short term goal to start doing some color studies. Mostly outdoors but some inside with photographs. I finally broke the seal on my oil paints this weekend. I m getting my first painting on canvas as we speak (type). I will post the photo soon. It is a simple piece but it is what got me started in oil and help me move to a new medium. I love the acrylics but the frustrate me in the Texas heat. Now I know why so many southwest artist paint in oil not acrylic.

These color studies will be on cheaper panel board and will be quick color and value studies with no heavy details. I think this will help me expand my freedom and flow. You guys are great encouragement. We all need more of that when the bumps come. Thanks All.

Happy Painting :painting:
Will Evans


thegrindre

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Reply #11 on: September 26, 2011, 08:28:21 AM
I think you'll find more freedom in oils, Smokie. The drying time is much longer and you can sit with a paintbrush between your teeth while thinking things through and not have to worry about the paint drying up on you.
Shucks, you could even run to the store for supplies and still have a wet canvas when you got back.   ;)

Happy painting...
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: October 09, 2011, 10:08:36 AM
You're like me Val on details. I'm currently doing that Archway in Jeruslaem photo. You probably seen it in the forum. This is a good example of how to arrive to the details. I'm going to GENERALIZE the large areas first with darkest darks, and some of those middle tone areas (also large), then blend them together. Then within them, get less and less vague about things, but keeping it on the same level of the vagueness till your ready for the more detailed level. Not all images are quite so easy to decipher like that, but you have to look at the SHAPES of large areas first. They might not have any hard boundaries at all..might just blend into other places, but look for these SEPERATE ares of values. You'll have to decide where they separate sometimes, then just smoothly blend them together and work into them..getting smaller and smaller into detail. You probably know all this already, but just a reminder.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #13 on: October 13, 2011, 05:30:40 PM
How's your painting coming, Smokie?  Even though we may use smaller panels or canvases, and in the process save money on paint, the effort and results are like we have worked on a major project and can be quite satisfying!  Since I started painting again a few months ago, I found it nice to work with smaller canvases, while gradually getting myself back into art work.  And on this forum there's so much to learn to help me do better paintings! :gl: :painting:


patindaytona

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Reply #14 on: November 19, 2011, 11:02:18 AM
Churchill's quote: ...."success is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm"....and Degas who said, "painting is easy when you don't know how, but very difficult when you do!"

"When the "context" of the painting has been more blocked-in,   judgement can be finer now and more specific"
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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