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Author Topic: Mixed Colours Separating  (Read 1797 times)

Val

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on: September 21, 2011, 03:06:43 AM
When painting the background for the tulips, I used wet on wet and let the colours do their thing. At one point, the permanent rose and cerulean blue made a lovely lilac/lavender colour. I managed to reproduce it and was using it for the tulip on the right. As can be seen, the two colours kept separating. What happened to cause this? (The tulips were also painted wet on wet.) Too much water on the paper?  :confused:
Have had this happen before.

Cheers, Val

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thegrindre

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Reply #1 on: September 21, 2011, 08:09:15 AM
Can't help you with that one, Val. I haven't touched watercolors since grade school.  :P
I was so horrible at it I never touched 'em again...  :2funny:
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dennis

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Reply #2 on: September 21, 2011, 02:18:47 PM
Hard to tell from the picture but it looks like you used too much water and when you drop in the other color it will start to spread quickly. If one of the pigments is heavier or denser than the other then that will settle down faster than the other as so give the effect you have there.  Try different reds and blue combinations and see what results you get. Keep these as references for later work.

Sometimes when you mix in the tray you will see some of the colors separating. Make note of them so you know which are the granular colors. Then these can be used to great effect in some paintings.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #3 on: September 21, 2011, 02:40:58 PM
Thanks Dennis...new lesson learned. I hadn't really thought of the density in the different colours, that makes a lot of sense. I'll have to play about with them a bit more....aawwww  :2funny: and as you say, take note of what each does. I'm still working on the 'how wet is wet' problem, but I think I did get a good leg up with this one.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


dennis

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Reply #4 on: September 21, 2011, 03:39:34 PM
The "wet in wet" techniques is a tricky one and can only come from actual practical experience and observation. What happens when the paper is very wet, shiny wet, damp and almost dry. Coupled to this is the humidity or dryness of the air - not forgetting whether it is a hot or cold day  :heeha: :confused: :help:

It still is great fun because watercolor is a "living" medium and one really never knows just what is waiting around the corner.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #5 on: September 22, 2011, 04:47:47 PM
I will second that... it definitely has a mind of its own!  :heeha:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


 

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