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Author Topic: Stretched Canvas Corners  (Read 3060 times)

dennis

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on: July 11, 2010, 11:06:29 PM
What are these Goodies for?



What are these? And just what are they used for, and where?

I often get asked this question by my students, and from this I assume that
there are many artists who have this same question,
but are afraid to ask for fear of being ridiculed.



These are used for re-tensioning the canvas should it become sloppy.
These wedges can be either of wood or of plastic such as these.
Until you need them keep them safely with the painting frame.

When you are ready to use them it is easier to first set them out on the
corners as shown above. You can see that they follow the same shape of the
mitred corner, except that the angled edges are not quite the same angle.



Pick up the wedge and, while holding it in the same position, push it into the slot as shown.


Wedge fully inserted.



Insert the next wedge as shown.



Both wedges in place ready for the final tensioning.
Do the same for the other three corners.



Finally, set the frame on it's end and gently tap the wedge firmly into the slot.
Do the same for all the other wedges, all the while checking that the canvas
is sufficiently taut.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2010, 02:53:08 PM by nolan »
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #1 on: November 08, 2010, 11:45:10 PM
Very interesting, I've never seen them before. Thanks
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Kelley

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Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 09:22:27 PM
That's it!  Thank you for re-posting Nolan.
Kelley


Susan

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Reply #3 on: August 01, 2011, 04:59:48 AM
Yikes!  I just posted a question on this EXACT thing!  Sorry!  Just scrap that last question then.  This is AMAZING, thank you!!  :1hug:
To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist.  ~Schumann


Val

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Reply #4 on: August 02, 2011, 04:31:04 AM
Surprising the things we learn! This popped up as a good reminder once I start working with the acrylics again. Won't use canvas until I get reasonably comfortable with the paints. BUT...I will remember not to throw those bits out!  ;D
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 04:35:21 AM by Val »
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Susan

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Reply #5 on: August 02, 2011, 05:29:32 AM
No Val, let's not throw the bits out...  :2funny: But I'm wondering... sounds like a silly question but I'm presuming you stretch the canvas before you start painting on it yes? And why would one want to stretch a canvas in the first place?   :confused:
To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist.  ~Schumann


nolan

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Reply #6 on: August 02, 2011, 12:51:49 PM
the only time you would want to stretch a canvas yourself that I can think of would be if you are limited on space, so you would stretch to paint, then remove after the painting is complete to store / sell to tourists in roll format


dennis

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Reply #7 on: August 03, 2011, 03:05:50 AM
Another thing is that they can only make canvas panel to a certain size before it becomes unwieldy and heavy - very seldom bigger than 24 x 36". Above that canvas from a roll is stretched over a special frame with struts to keep it rigid and to take the strain of the stretching. These are much lighter and easier to handle but still have to be careful of not punching a hole in it. I have had to repair several in my day.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Susan

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Reply #8 on: August 04, 2011, 06:08:08 AM
Yes I understand about giving them to tourists when they're not on their wooden frames but sometimes I buy these really small $2 canvases for practice pieces and they have them too!  I can understand if one is using a huge canvas to keep it nice and taught, but.. well.. it's all a little strange.  Maybe I'll just get the hammer out and see what happens...  :whistle:
To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist.  ~Schumann


Val

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Reply #9 on: August 04, 2011, 10:45:18 AM
I'm not sure where I heard it.... but is it true that sometimes a painted canvas over time can become a bit slack? Then I remember that the 'widgets' can be pushed/hammered into the corners to retension the painting. Is this correct?  ???
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Susan

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Reply #10 on: August 05, 2011, 06:26:17 AM
Well that makes sense Val, I hadn't thought about that, that they can get slack over time.  Ok then, let's not bin the widgets anymore...  ;D
To send light into the darkness of men's hearts - such is the duty of the artist.  ~Schumann


nolan

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Reply #11 on: August 05, 2011, 02:39:31 PM
that is correct, see the original post by Dennis for instructions O0


Val

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Reply #12 on: August 06, 2011, 02:57:19 AM
Isn't it amazing how our memory works at ?? percent....but our hindsight is 100% ?  :whistle:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


 

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