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Author Topic: Selling  (Read 6487 times)

thegrindre

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Reply #15 on: September 17, 2011, 12:13:04 PM
Tell your wife to shoot for $295...  ;)
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Kelley

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Reply #16 on: September 17, 2011, 11:06:27 PM
Pat, I felt the same way about my paintings.  I didn't know how much to sell for.  I ended selling my first for a "donation" for $50.  With that, I felt more comfortable selling the next for $100 then the third for the same.  The first $150 went to an orphanage in Haiti, but the next to help replenish my art supplies.  I could have asked for less, but the gentleman who purchased them wanted to help the cause.  As it turns out, the paintings he framed look fabulous in his home and he is very happy with them.  I am normally very modest about such things, but I have to say it felt good to see my labor being enjoyed and appreciated by someone else. 

Pat, I don't doubt your work could sell for $1000 framed, but you could strike a deal with the buyer if you want to network.  If it's just one then you could probably name your price.
Kelley


Val

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Reply #17 on: September 18, 2011, 02:50:09 AM
I think its pretty much unanimous on this end Pat... the absolute minimum should be not less than $100. Try $200 after all, that is what negotiation is all about. From than on you can feel more comfortable about setting your price. I think Kelley is right on that front.   :nono: Don't undersell yourself Pat, you are an exceptionally gifted artist...got any ceilings need painting?  :whistle:
Cheers, Val

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patindaytona

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Reply #18 on: September 18, 2011, 04:23:06 AM
.........I will have to wait till the lady contacts me again on this. Might not even be till we see her in person sometime, which could be a while. Maybe by then, she might change her mind and not even mention the painting again. I still think she'll flip when she hears a price like that.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


EllaNZ

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Reply #19 on: September 18, 2011, 03:52:30 PM
Pat, back in the good old days I bought a lovely dress for about $45. I felt so guilty for spending the $ but when my other half asked me  :knuppel2: what did you pay for it, I said $100. He nearly got a heart attack and to save his life I said I'm only kidding  :angel: , I paid $50  :2funny: He sat down and said oh that is ok but, ... and started the lecture.  So do feel free to put a high price on it and then negotiate. You have put all the hard work in it  :tickedoff: why should we feel guilty at all?  ;)
Stay Positive

Ella


Val

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Reply #20 on: September 18, 2011, 04:26:51 PM
 O0   :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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smokie55

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Reply #21 on: September 19, 2011, 08:54:25 AM
I think this is an interesting topic.  The main reason is selling something you have done for hobby or fun can be a hard thing to do. At least pricing it can be. However, think of this. You will probably paint a lot of different paintings over time. If you saved them all, they would not get shared with others. When someone buys your work and hangs it up. they are spreading your creativity with the world. I look at my work as stages on a journey. Once I have the idea, and put it into practice and place it on a surface. That part of the journey ends for me. I move on. I look for new challenges and test myself with a new idea. If someone were to want to keep my work and share it, they have to remember that this is the only one like it. Not a mass produce print. So it won't be seen all over the place. To say you are unsure of your quality or skill in pricing a piece, I can understand that too. I am my worst critic. My work looks goofy to me sometimes and worthless. But as Dennis said. To others they are flawless works of art. I think others are right on with the range. 150-200 is absolutely fair for both parties. When the day comes that you can't keep paintings around for more than a few moments. then you need to raise the price. This will make you happy and will make other collectors of your art happy as well. This means you are getting better and getting a following.

Now if you do this solely to easy your mind and have fun. Then re-coupe your cost and move on. Not my suggestion, but it helps keep the cost down. I would like to work toward building a nice little studio and teach others to enjoy painting. That cost money. Money I might could get by selling some works. I hope this helps you out. BTW. I would price any commissioned paintings 50% higher. I feel the expectations are higher and it seems more like work than fun at that point. Just my most humble opinion.

Your work does have value and you deserve to sell it if someone wants it. Don't sell your talents short.
Will Evans


Val

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Reply #22 on: September 19, 2011, 11:12:02 AM
Your work does have value and you deserve to sell it if someone wants it. Don't sell your talents short.
:yippee:  :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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patindaytona

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Reply #23 on: September 19, 2011, 02:00:51 PM
..haven't heard from her, but I'm expecting that so far. She's my wife's friend and not a close friend. So, it may be a while before we see her. By then, she might change her mind, i don't know. I told my wife about your guys' opinions on prices and my wife sort of made a funny face (too high). I just don't know! Smokie, I read your ideas. Sure, I agree with you (why not....that's alot of money :D    But again, it's my feelings....these "outsider" people don't have a clue about prices and art. I suppose that's not the point though. I just don't want to feel like I'm being pig headed when she responds to such a high price. Now, if i was to sell on the internet..I wouldn't care. Just don't want to face someone's reaction in person. And...I might not have too, but then I might..I'll have to wait and see. Probably will, since we don't see her unless me and wife are together every time. I'm kind of stuck. I wish my wife would see and ask her without me around. My feeling aren't going to change on this matter.....as you can see.  :whistle:
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #24 on: September 20, 2011, 04:23:23 AM
Pat I had a business for over 25yrs. and as much as I hate to say it, some 'friends' and aquaintances thought that if they knew me or Lloyd, that meant they were entitled to get what they wanted at a 'give-away' price. This is the difficult part, friends are one thing...business is another. Sometimes they need to be reminded that you are not Father Christmas! (SantaClaus)
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #25 on: September 20, 2011, 04:40:48 AM
Val, that makes alot of sense. I can understand your position there.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Kelley

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Reply #26 on: September 20, 2011, 06:24:50 AM
Val, I was afraid to say it, but you've nailed it - I couldn't have put it better.
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #27 on: September 22, 2011, 04:44:17 PM
100% correct. Our family know they don't get a discount because they are family. We have a business to run and have bills to pay, so no charity from us. The same works the other way around, we pay full price by them too.

Back to pricing your paintings : The problem I have with the pricing of art is that amateur / hobby artists tend to sell their art way too cheap as they usually only want to recoup their costs / get enough money to buy the next canvas. This makes life very difficult for professional artists who depend on a decent price for their paintings. The professional artist has priced his painting based on his expenses and living costs plus a profit, just like any business would. But the man on the street (customer) sees one painting selling for peanuts and another selling for it's normal price and thinks that the regular priced painting is selling too expensively.

So here is my advice : If you are a hobby artist and you are pricing your paintings too cheaply, you are not only throwing your own money away, but also destroying the market for the professional artists. It is important to think of the bigger picture as well. If you have created a work of art that is comparable to something you will find in a gallery, then you are fully entitled to sell it at that price because that is what it is worth, regardless of whether you need the money or not.

Think of it this way : If you want to sell your old iPhone so you can go and buy the new model, what will you price it at? You will probably go to Amazon or look in the newspaper to see what other people are selling their second hand iPhones for and then charge a similar price because that is what it is worth, regardless of whether you need that money or not. You won't feel bad about asking the same price will you?

So why sell your paintings for $50 when they are worth $300? Why feel bad asking the normal price for your painting, it just doesn't make sense  :-\


Val

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Reply #28 on: September 22, 2011, 04:54:00 PM
 :clap:  :clap:  :clap:  :clap:  Exactly.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Travis

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Reply #29 on: September 22, 2011, 06:54:17 PM
I agree with Nolan about how to price your paintings and about giving away your art work to family and friends for pretty much nothing. I also got to say that I was in the same place a few years back I didn't like to ask for to much and was just about giving them away and I would be like darn why did I just do that when I should have asked for more and I wasn't happy with that but I was always to afraid to ask for the price I wanted for my time and paint because I didn't want that person to say will thats to high a price and walk away from the painting they wanted and then maybe other people wouldn't want to buy my art because of the high price, so i was thinking to myself after asking other artist and even people that are not artist what should I do? and how gmuch is my art really worth and I just came up with a plan for my time and paint cost and now I tell people that wants a painting done  ok sure this is what I charge per hour or whatever and this size painting will cost you around such and such a price depending on the size and detail of the work, and to my surprise I haven't had one person turn away and I keep getting new people asking about my art and getting paintings done. I found this to be working good for me and the buyer of my art work.


have a great day

Travis.


 

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