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Author Topic: Selling  (Read 6476 times)

patindaytona

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on: September 16, 2011, 08:08:15 AM
One of my wife's friends is kind of interested in buying this one. I have never sold a painting before. Tell you the truth, I really don't want to sell them! I don't know what you might think of that. It's just that I can't really think of a monetary value on the time and frustration of doing them. And I know I'm not making a fortune off of any if I do sell them. That money will be good for a tank full of gas and that's about it. This is an 11 x 14 I think...not that big. IF....i decide to sell it, I could always attempt to do another one, but bigger (and better).
Any ideas on a price for something that size? (US dollars) By the way, my wife is good at bargaining...I do not like doing that.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #1 on: September 16, 2011, 10:27:49 AM
This put me in the abstract mood. I just did up two abstracts besides this one on my computer. Now, I just have to paint them. Purely shapes like this one is.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #2 on: September 16, 2011, 01:36:28 PM
 :clap: Thats great Pat, if you sell a few you'll have space for more new ones.
How to set a price is difficult. Lots to take in to consideration...time, materials, size, level of difficulty..... I've thought about it and well, I'm still scratching my head over that one.  :cost:  :confused:
Perhaps Dennis or Nolan can help figure this one out. Have any of you guys out there ever sold your paintings? How did you arrive at a price? Is there a formula you can use?  :help:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: September 16, 2011, 01:37:45 PM
Good questions Val. I know you don't want to put a price on it based on your personal opinion. I can understand that. What if I told the lady I cursed throughout the whole piece. Will that raise the price on it :D
Really..I need to know soon and have no idea.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #4 on: September 16, 2011, 01:52:18 PM
Pat.. just remembered if you look on the main forum page about halfway down I think, there is a section on selling your paintings. Have you looked in there? Don't remember what is in there but might be something you can try.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #5 on: September 16, 2011, 02:14:50 PM
HERE is the thread you are looking for Pat


patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: September 16, 2011, 03:45:50 PM
Very interestiong topic on selling Dennis. What caught my eye was that you do many 2 hour paintings. You also said to go slow and the speed will pick up with experience. This is mainly why I get frustrated and end up rushing..because i'm in a hurry to get it done. So, does this mean with time....I can do alot of very good paintings in 2-5 hours time?
That would be great!  I'm still not sure about what I should charge this lady. A friend of mine who sells alot of paintings in a local gallery (not serious painterly work, but quick little paintings for tourists)...sells them for alot! Not sure, but it's like $100 for one  8x 10 inch..something like that. And he sells alot. Anyway..he suggested $150 to sell my little  11 x 14 abstract, and if i really want to get rid of it, then sell for $100. Well, I'm way too embarrased to sell for that amount (ask).  I might ask for $65 possibly. My wife does all the negotiating with people..so she'll tell her (she's a friend of my wife anyways).
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: September 16, 2011, 03:47:13 PM
Thanks Val....you know what..I'm already starting a new one of that same abstract painting, but alot bigger (16 x20).  I already taped it off and painted in the black background. Going slow though..I'm preparing for that tutorial on Tuesday..don't want too much on my hands.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #8 on: September 16, 2011, 03:51:31 PM
Here's a formula I've always used when someone wanted to buy my 'art' I didn't really want to sell.
What's it worth to me? It's not for sale but if I was to get 'X' amount of dollars, I'd let it go.
The 'X' amount is usually pretty high and would be something I would like to receive.

Now, that item looks to be worth at least a $1,000 to me, Pat...

That's my formula for selling 'keepers'.
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: September 16, 2011, 04:24:45 PM
1000 dollars? She's probably have a good laugh if I told her that. I really don't like to part with my paintings, because I keep thinking, "what if i decide to stop painting"? I hope I don't, but that's why I want to keep all of them for now. It wasn't one of my really hard one's to paint, so that's why I'm starting a new one of it already. And also why I think I can sell it, but it's hard to know what another person's idea of what it's worth is to them. It may surprise them because of how MUCH or how LITTLE I sell it for. That's usually what happens with art. But that's due to what the person's own opinion of it's price is. I may part with it for $65 if she wants it.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


thegrindre

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Reply #10 on: September 16, 2011, 05:44:00 PM
Ha, if you really want to keep it, try a 95 dollar price tag. If it sells, you'll both be happy. If not, you'll at least have established somewhat of a price range for any future paintings.

(It still looks like a $1,000 painting to me...  ;) )

Those are my thoughts...  ;)
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


Val

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Reply #11 on: September 17, 2011, 01:54:04 AM
Pat, the worst thing you can do is undersell yourself. I have two wonderful friends who both paint. One is a bit unsure of herself and tends to sell her paintings for average $40.  Much too low for her work (I have 2 but insisted on paying her a bit more). The other sells prints of her paintings for $35-50 (8x10) and her paintings for an average of $350 +

$100 is not overly high when you consider all of your time, materials etc.  I think its a good place to start, if your friend thinks its too high ask her what she considers fair. At least you'll have a starting point.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: September 17, 2011, 05:22:32 AM
Thanks Val and thegrinde. I absolutely don't like asking for prices on anything I sell. My wife is good at that with people. I cringe just thinking that SHE will ask that amount for it! The lady who wants it might think "this guy is rediculous thinking he can get that much money for his paintings...he probably thinks he's a genius or something". That's why I dare not ask face to face. I do agree though Val, that alot of time was in it (fair amount) and all that aside, you still have to consider that any original piece of art if worth a decent amount of money. I'll get back with you all on what ever happens....
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #13 on: September 17, 2011, 11:08:24 AM
I'll be pulling for you... crossed my fingers and toes.  :D  :gl2:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #14 on: September 17, 2011, 11:35:19 AM
I feel embarrased to even ask the 65 dollars. You're probably right about prices though Val. But to somebody who doesn't know a thing about art (and even doesn't ever buy art) has no idea and to them, I can understand these seem like rediculous prices to them. That's why it's embarrasing to ask something like that....but then again......my wife has no shame about asking. She's from the Philippines and they bargain like crazy over there. Doesn't bother her one bit.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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