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Author Topic: How do you take pictures of your work?  (Read 1142 times)

thegrindre

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on: September 13, 2011, 01:04:52 AM
Hi all,
OK, I have a problem of getting my paintings posted to this forum in good clear form.
I have a 3-in-One printer that will scan an 8 1/2x11 inch piece of paper. My canvases are 11x14's so when I scan my work, I lose a couple inches off the top and sides if I want to show my painting in close up detail.
How are you guys getting such a clear precise shot of your painting to be posted here?

As mentioned elsewhere, I stink at taking photographs but have purchased a cheap Sony Camcorder to take field photos for my model building endeavors but, it stinks for this type of picture taking and posting to the forums.

How are you guys doing it?

Thanks,
« Last Edit: September 13, 2011, 01:10:03 AM by thegrindre »
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


Val

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Reply #1 on: September 13, 2011, 05:11:48 AM
I got lucky.... I use my underwater camera and it just happens to take good pictures anywhere. I found in the past all that is required is a reasonably cheap digital camera, does the trick nicely. Download the photos to your computer and you can resize them. I use Picnik online. Very easy to use and you can also adjust brightness etc. if you're so inclined.
Hope this helps a bit.  :wave:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Leana

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Reply #2 on: September 13, 2011, 07:33:37 AM
Val, way to go... underwater camera... I LOVE IT... agree, why if it takes excellent shots not use it out of water too.  O0
I normally take my painting outside, natural light, put in in a shade spot...preferably not on the ground directly.  Take my Point and Shoot digital camera...only has 4 mega pixels.  Stability is extremely important, it prevents out of focus photos...so a tri-pod is ideal...but you can improvise and use whatever is available... for stability.  I will easily take between 5 and 10 photos... every photo on a different setting.  Then upload it to my computer, I use Microsoft to cut the photo so that you only see the painting and no surroundings.  I also make use of GIMP which is free software on-line that you can download...for various other stuff if I need to.  A few artists I know of use GIMP to do digital artwork too... not my cup of tea though... too much information for my non-computer brain  :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:

It is import when you take your photo, not to have the flash on...it creates a terrible glare on your painting when you take the photo.  Also do not put your painting in the sun to take photos either... the sun is never good for a painting and it also creates glares etc.

I also find the perfect time for photos is when it is cloudy, but not raining, outside... BUT then again... we don't have those around 24, 7,365...thank goodness :clap:

Hope this information helps.  Would be interesting to see how other artists take photos of their artwork too... can always learn something new.
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


Travis

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Reply #3 on: September 13, 2011, 10:18:29 AM
I also use my digital camera for taking photos of my art work. and as for where to take the picture I usually try different areas of my house where the lighting is different and outside as will, I find that with my new camera taking photos of bright colors often come out really bright, like when i took a picture of my Tulip my painting is more orange but each picture I took most of them came out really red and i would also lose some detail work.  Also when I take photos of my work I make sure I have it on mirco mode I think that's the name of it, most cameras have this , there should be a flower symbol I use that mode because It allows me to get close to my painting and still get a really clear shot and it also is good for getting a lot of details in as will. and I don't use any flash.

Hope this is a bit of help for others.

Have a great day

Travis.


Val

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Reply #4 on: September 14, 2011, 02:09:54 AM
 :oops: Forgot to mention, I take my photos indoors. The sun is so bright here most days it just washes everything out. Even with the window covers the saloon is still very bright but I usually can get a good shot.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


thegrindre

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Reply #5 on: September 14, 2011, 04:41:41 AM
Keep 'em comin', folks. I'm takin' notes...   8)

Thanks,
a.k.a. Rick
At my age, 'Happy Hour' is a nap...


smokie55

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Reply #6 on: September 26, 2011, 06:10:47 AM
I take my pics indoors and use a point and shoot 10 meg digital. No flash at all. I have CFL lights in the house and they play havok on my photos. I can take a series of three shot all in on place and they will all come out slightly different in color. I really need to set up a better lighting system. I bet if I look on the web, someone has made a cheap photo studio for picture taking and I can play off their ideas. I will let you know. My pics are clear and detailed. Its the color and lighting that cause me problems in constancy.

I await all answers to help me as well. :help:
Will Evans


Kelley

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Reply #7 on: September 26, 2011, 06:16:14 AM
I do the same as you Smokie55, but mine is an 8.1 Megapixels camera.  I manipulate the ISO sensitivity and white balance to get as close as I can to what is really on my canvas.  Thereafter I use Picassa to fine tune if I need to.  I didn't grow up with photo editing so I'm a bit old school about taking pictures correctly the first time (although the camera I have isn't that great).
Kelley


valweb

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Reply #8 on: September 26, 2011, 12:23:58 PM
Thanks for this tips....this is the area I really battle with  :uglystupid2:.....I usually end up with some very bright colours.  A tripod is a must to get clarity.....
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