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Author Topic: Shadow Colors  (Read 1532 times)

lynn p.

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on: March 11, 2015, 01:12:22 PM
I just finished the portrait of Arthur which is in the encourager section.  A very experienced artist saw the painting and had this to say---which confuses me.  He said the light in the photo is cool and thus the lit part of the wall should be cooler and the shadow warmer (the opposite of what I have).  He also said that the subtle shadows in his beard should be warmer.  My confusion is, it was early morning and the only light was through a window so I assume that is "warm" but I see what he says about seeing the warm shadows in the photo.  Should they have photographed cooler?  Also, this is a made up background and I never thought about the cooler or warmer treatment.  Should I switch the background up?  ? He thinks the background is not consistent with the light in other parts of the painting.  This is very interesting to me.  What do you all know about this?


mea hamo pena

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Reply #1 on: March 11, 2015, 01:20:49 PM
I think it really only matters what Arthur thinks of it, Lynn.

 To redo what you have there now would be a shame.  Hey, what about artistic license?

You can learn about the warmer/cooler shadow stuff for the next painting.   Maybe Nolan or Dennis explained it in one of the lessons that you haven't done yet.  Guys??

aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


sally13

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Reply #2 on: March 11, 2015, 01:33:32 PM
Mea you could not have said it better, thats exactly what i think too.

Lynn You have done a wonderful job of Arthur. :yippee: :yippee: :yippee: Be proud of him.


ncwren

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Reply #3 on: March 11, 2015, 04:07:17 PM
Pfftttt!
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


lynn p.

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Reply #4 on: March 11, 2015, 05:49:52 PM
You guys are funny.  I am not upset at all by his comments just trying to understand his points.  It does seem sensible that if cool light is present, the lighter areas of a background would be cooler.  I was just wondering how he figured out the light was cool--I assume by some warm shadows in the reference?  Nolan and Dennis, is it right to say that morning light is usually warm though?  I suppose I have just studied the colors I see but now that I am "inventing" some of the composition, I should pay attention to this stuff :)


dennis

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Reply #5 on: March 11, 2015, 06:52:57 PM
Looks like my post did not go through for this.


There is nothing wrong with the shadows in your fabulous portrait painting.  :clap: :clap:
However, having said that there is truth in what he said. It just depends in what circumstances you will apply it - used a lot in landscapes.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


lynn p.

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Reply #6 on: March 12, 2015, 04:39:27 AM
Thanks for your comments Dennis.  I always struggle some with the cool and warm shadow idea because it all seems very relative.


C.Bodine

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Reply #7 on: March 12, 2015, 04:45:25 AM
I think it's perfect! I wouldn't touch it!

Christina


Val

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Reply #8 on: March 12, 2015, 05:44:30 AM
Agree with Dennis and C.  O0   Don't touch it!  :nono:     ;D
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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lynn p.

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Reply #9 on: March 12, 2015, 07:22:17 PM
I am not going to touch it, as I like it as it is.  The artist who commented was Ken Tiessen, a very accomplished pastel portrait artist, so I am trying to learn.   You can see his paintings on his website. http://kentiessenart.com  When I asked him to clarify, he said that it is a good idea in portraiture to choose cool or warm light and be consistent through out the painting (e.g., cool lights, warm shadows in skin and background).  I am going to think about this for future paintings.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2015, 07:30:32 PM by lynn p. »


artistforsaleorrent

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Reply #10 on: March 13, 2015, 03:33:55 AM
Having viewed both the reference photos and the actual pastel, I find very little to critique. It's very well done, and true to the subject. You captured both his personality and his features. He will be pleased, no doubt. You might add more depth to the background next time if you're going with a plain featureless one, maybe make it appear several feet behind the subject rather than a closer one. Otherwise,  O0
Never be afraid to fail, because after all, "fail" actually stands for "the first attempt in learning". Robert


ncwren

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Reply #11 on: March 13, 2015, 08:22:14 AM
Lynn check out "Painting Beautiful Skin Tones with Color and Light in Oil, Pastel and Watercolor" by Chris Saper.
She gets into Kelvin temperatures for portrait painters.

I don't understand it and right now, it is way beyond my grasp-made my brain misfire a few times. I had to step away from it and decide that the lighting temp in my portraits is "Natalie" temp.  ;D
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


lynn p.

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Reply #12 on: March 13, 2015, 12:48:33 PM
Thanks for your comments artistforsaleorrent!
Thanks for reminding me about her.  I have her portrait painting book and I'll go back and check that section out.  Your the best Natalie!
« Last Edit: March 13, 2015, 12:51:13 PM by lynn p. »


ncwren

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Reply #13 on: March 13, 2015, 12:51:52 PM
 O0
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Sue cq

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Reply #14 on: March 20, 2015, 01:20:27 PM
The one thing about color that I have just really understood is that warm Colors come forward and cool Colors recede.  If you use cool Colors in your background it will give a greater feeling of space behind your subject!  I just painted The Deer in Nolan's Oil class.....so fun!.....and the antlers were not looking like I wanted!! :/. Blue in the shadow on the back antlers and poof!  That part  just moved right back where it belonged!!! 
Color is amazing!  Sue cq


 

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