Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Ester Roi & her Icarus Board  (Read 2072 times)

Denise808

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2439
Reply #15 on: October 22, 2014, 06:45:04 PM
Wow, love how brilliant the colors look!!
"Purple alone is pretty, but place mint green alongside and the purple becomes glorious. Sometimes we need to be a green in a purple person's life." ~Carolyn Blish


BeaSue

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2312
Reply #16 on: October 26, 2014, 11:44:14 AM
Well, as promised in the topic about Ester Roi, I am reporting back my results of using a food warming tray to activate colors. (Boy...I am no Ester Roi!  ;D)


The top two demonstrations were done with Prismacolor colored pencils. These are soft, wax-based pencils--very creamy. The image on the left has been burnished by placing the paper on a food warming tray on the highest setting and using a paper stump to burnish it. The pencils did melt somewhat, but I could never seem to get the color well into the tooth of the paper. The image on the top right was done by burnishing the colored pencils with a paper stump dipped into baby oil. Much better result.

The bottom two images were made using Caron d'Ache Neocolor II, a Swiss product that is a water-soluble wax pastel. They look and act like crayons. I had the same issue with the heat--it never melted the medium enough to get it into the paper. The image on the lower right is with the same crayons that were activated using a damp brush and clear water. I could move the color around a little bit--unlike any of the other options--and it felt like watercolor.

Lessons learned:

1. My food warming tray got quite hot, but maybe Roi's tray gets even hotter (?!) Also, I know I wasn't as careful as she was about going painstaking step-by-step when she demonstrated how to do the pebbles. I was just eager to get some comparisons done.

2. When working with this sort of medium, it might be better to use a smoother surface (I used Arches 140 lb cold press paper), like a hot-pressed paper.

3.  If you press too hard when transferring your drawing to the paper, you will end up with indentations on the paper that can be a little hard to fill with color.

4.  I prefer my watercolors to these. I like to be able to see what my results will be, rather than laying down color and then using something to burnish--heat or baby oil or a solvent or water--to see what the final result will be. I don't like feeling that I was giving up that sort of control.

5.  The watercolor crayons are actually rather fun, and I think they could be used successfully to handle some backgrounds. I'm going to try them for this.
« Last Edit: October 26, 2014, 12:13:23 PM by BeaSue »
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


nolan

  • Administrator
  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 11259
    • Draw With Nolan
Reply #17 on: October 26, 2014, 12:00:20 PM
looks like you had fun with this. The top two seem the nicer of the four. I agree on the paper being too rough, a smoother paper would have dramatically improved the final result. well done :clap: :clap: :clap:


ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #18 on: October 26, 2014, 01:22:16 PM
Heat gun?
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


BeaSue

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2312
Reply #19 on: October 26, 2014, 01:35:34 PM
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


mea hamo pena

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 13657
  • Oh, my! ART!
    • Long Lost Art by MaryAnne Long
Reply #20 on: October 26, 2014, 02:26:37 PM
BeaSue,

This looks very interesting and fun to do.

Results are quite lovely.

aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #21 on: October 26, 2014, 04:57:49 PM
 ;D
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Kerripepper

  • Pencil
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Reply #22 on: January 06, 2018, 01:16:51 PM
I made my own heati g board by sandwiching a Heating pad between a piece of acrylic sheet from Lowes ( precut sizes and I got mine for $10.00) and a piece of cardboard.  It's not pretty but it works well on my drawing board and paintings!  The heating pad does not get as hot as the food warmer.  Hope this helps!


 

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal