Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Canvas???  (Read 747 times)

Willow

  • Pencil
  • *
  • Posts: 2
on: September 17, 2014, 07:35:03 AM
I was wondering if I could use canvases? I don't have pastel paper but I have several canvases, so could I use them
 instead of the papers? I am very new to this medium. :confused: Thanks :thankyou:


Germa

  • Guest
Reply #1 on: September 17, 2014, 08:44:11 AM
Yes, you can, as long as your canvasses have enough tooth and the weaves aren't totally filled with gesso or something.

When that's ok, a canvas has the required texture to 'hold' your pastels. It's a bit more expensive than paper, I guess.

Have fun!



ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #2 on: September 17, 2014, 10:15:35 AM
Pastels are generally framed under glass.  I would think that you would need to take the canvas off the stretcher bars to better protect them.  I would use regular sketching paper over canvas.  I understand wanting to use what you have on hand, but I think stretched canvas would not be a viable option.
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Germa

  • Guest
Reply #3 on: September 17, 2014, 10:37:32 AM
Regular sketching paper may be way too smooth, no teeth, tooth, whatever  :crazy2:.

You'll need to use fixative, painting on a canvas, but it is a well known method:
http://www.ehow.com/how_4450686_use-pastels-canvas.html


ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #4 on: September 17, 2014, 04:27:33 PM
Germa that isn't a very informative article.  :-\
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Germa

  • Guest
Reply #5 on: September 17, 2014, 11:43:15 PM
You've read the whole page down? What more information do you need? The painting technics stay the same, on paper and on canvas. Only difference; you really have to use the fixative as told under nr 6.

It didn't mean to post a tutorial, I posted the article to show pastels on canvas aren't a very bad idea. Maybe you can use google yourself to find other articles with more information.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 11:46:11 PM by Germa »


ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #6 on: September 18, 2014, 06:49:40 AM
Germa I don't think it is a good article.
Bottom line the pastel painting still needs to be protected even with fixitive.
It would be a shame for a nice painting to get smeary or flake off.

I have used sketch paper with nice results and very little my pastel used up.

As far as the Google remark I can only surmise that you were offended by my opinion.
For that I am genuinely sorry.
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Germa

  • Guest
Reply #7 on: September 18, 2014, 10:56:33 AM
I know pastel paintings normally need to be protected. But nevertheless, loads of artists do paint pastel on other surfaces than paper with a good tooth. I've seen pastel paintings on sand paper, without the protection of glass... and on canvas you can protect your pastel with different kind of varnishes.

It's a pity there are lots of pages in Dutch, about pastel painting on canvas and what kind of varnish to use...

one thing about 'rules' in art; don't bother about rules; the greatest artist were those who dared to break all the existing rules. Rembrandt broke the rules, van Gogh broke the rules, all great artists are great because they changed things by breaking the rules.

1 rule you can't break painting with pastel; the surface you're painting on, can't be too smooth, because it won't hold the pastel powder stuff.


And I really thought Willow asked the question as a second choice, since he wants to practise on the canvasses and yes, you can.
A paintbasket class can never be your masterpiece, since the copyright thing. Personally, I wouldn't pastel paint my own designs on canvas, but that's just my choice, not because it can't be done, or because museums don't want pastel paintings on canvas, because I've seen them there... also oil pastel on cardboard... and that isn't as the 'rules' tell aether.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2014, 11:00:00 AM by Germa »


ncwren

  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 5342
    • NC Wren Fine Art
Reply #8 on: September 18, 2014, 11:36:23 AM
I still don't think stretched canvas is a good support for soft pastels.  Even if you were to use a spray varnish the flexing of the canvas would still have an impact on the finished piece-class work or not I wouldn't want to deal with chunky bits of varnished pastel flaking off of a canvas.

Breaking the rules is one thing and bad practices is another...I wouldn't encourage someone to paint acrylic over oil or soft pastel on stretched canvas.  Bad ideas for the preservation of the finished artwork-classwork or not.

Which is why I suggested sketch paper if pastel paper is out of reach for the pocket book.  Very nice work can be done with limited tooth.  There are pastel artists who use vellum which has even less tooth than sketch paper.
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


Germa

  • Guest
Reply #9 on: September 18, 2014, 11:46:48 PM
What if the choice is; paint on canvas or not paint at all because there is only canvas on hand and not paper.
I really think it's better to practise on canvas, then not practising at all or practise on a surface with no tooth.

If seen them, I've touched them, maybe first try before great ideas are thrown away as 'not as the rules as I know them', because you really cannot  take the soft pastel off the canvas, once fixative and varnish is used.

Wish I lived near you so I could show you the result of some... you'd be surprised by the result.

And again, I would choose pastel paper too, just because I have lots of it... but if I hadn't, I would use anything there was on hand.


Bellarina

  • Canvas
  • *
  • Posts: 2438
Reply #10 on: September 19, 2014, 05:53:29 AM
I've personally never framed a pastel on canvas in my framing buisness, but it could be done using spacers between the glass and canvas. Although you would need a deeper frame to accommodate for the canvas, spacer and glass.  Just my 2 cents worth. ;)
"Never stop Dreaming" 
Robin


 

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal