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Author Topic: Alcohol Underpainting for Pastel  (Read 634 times)

lynn p.

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on: March 03, 2014, 09:19:08 PM


I did this quick 9x12 painting on Wallis Paper with soft pastels based on a downloaded lesson on using a complementary alcohol underpainting.  I am sure Dennis will get to this but it was nifty.  Sorta like a watercolor underpainting but I used orange, purple and brown pastels as the underpainting, and set the pastels with rubbing alcohol (just brushing alcohol over them) It totally set the pastels and I could go over the colors with greens without picking the underpainting up at all.  In fact, when I rubbed my hand over the sanded paper, nothing came off.  Have to say, it was cool to learn this!!!


Steven

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Reply #1 on: March 03, 2014, 09:59:33 PM
I like the way it turned out Lynn, :clap: I've done that too, I really like the effect of the wash and what a great under painting it makes, I also have tried Terpenoid (the Gamblin odorless turpentine).  They both evaporate fast and leave you ready to go on in minutes. 

Wallis paper is back ordered just about everywhere at the moment.
Steven

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jillh

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Reply #2 on: March 03, 2014, 10:09:58 PM
The painting turned out well, Lynn.  Really interesting test you did.  I've been looking for Wallis paper.  As Steven says it appears to be back ordered everywhere.  What paper have you been using if not Wallis paper?
Jill
"What is easy to do is also easy not to do.  That's the difference between success and failure, between daydreams and ambitions"


Steven

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Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 12:37:45 AM
Jill all my recent pastels are done on Strathmore watercolor paper that has been coated with 2 coats of Colorfix primer.  I don't like the strathmore for water color, it buckles too easily, but the treatment of the liquid Colorfix stuff works great for a pastel surface!  It's basically a gesso like you use to prime a canvas except it has pumice in the mix, so, 2 thin coats makes it similar to a Wallis paper.  I use one of those mini paint rollers to smooth it out, wetting the roller as needed to keep it flowing well.  The colorfix comes in a number of tones including clear, which is handy if you want to prime your surface after drawing a charcoal sketch first, it fixes the charcoal.

You can also buy pumice in bulk...  FFFF (4F) is about 500 grit, then mix a couple ounces with regular gesso which you can tone if you like...  or just paint it on straight.  That tends to be a wetter mix so best to let it dry back well between coats.  It sounds complicated but it's easy peasy as someone here might say  ;)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 12:41:11 AM by Steven »
Steven

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Harwant

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Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 06:32:57 AM
Looks great Lynn.Did you block in the tonal values with the under painting?Adds another dimension.
Harwant.
HVZ


NHC50

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Reply #5 on: March 04, 2014, 07:15:35 AM
This is interesting. I have never heard of this method. Do you use regular rubbing alcohol?
Steven question I was wondering if this treatment would work on a regular canvas and then use pastel on the canvas? That might be interesting. I always like trying different things. Lynn I like what you did.  O0 O0
Nina  :flowers:
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mea hamo pena

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Reply #6 on: March 04, 2014, 07:30:26 AM
I agree.  I find this totally fascinating.

I'm going to google alcohol underpainting and see what I find out.

aloha

mea
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jillh

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Reply #7 on: March 04, 2014, 08:26:36 AM
Steven,  thank you for taking the time for sharing all that info with me.  I will definitely try it.
Jill
"What is easy to do is also easy not to do.  That's the difference between success and failure, between daydreams and ambitions"


lynn p.

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Reply #8 on: March 04, 2014, 08:57:05 AM
Hi Harwant, Jill, Nina Mea and Steven. Steven, I haven't tried Turpenoid but I own some and should try.  I love the extra dimension this gives---brighter than watercolor underpainting and dries super quick.  Yes Nina I just used regular isopropol alcohol from the drug store.  Makes sense it would work as pastels are just sticks of pure pigment so you are making liquid paint and then the alcohol evaporates.  Love that the underpainting does't pick up.  Yes Harwant, I tried to do a value painting (not always successful) with the underpainting colors.  Then the top colors just change the hue but not so much the value.  I think it is an interesting approach for landscape where there are so many greens than can get boring.  This way you can add warmth or cool underneath and use your  greens on top.  Steven, I have heard of doing this but haven't tried.  Thanks for the detailed instruction.  For some strange reason, Wallis paper is plentiful here and I am buying a lot up.  You are right that the big suppliers seem to be out.  Go figure.  I am also using Art Spectrum sanded paper along with the Canson.  I have also tried Strathmore but not crazy about it. Just me.  I like the sanded finish.  Bought some 400 UArt and eager to try.


On another note, sorry I have been so absent.  Work is a killer right now and am caring for my 6 month old grandson on my few off hours.  Need I say more.  It is Mardi Gras today (although coldest I can ever remember and rainy --so Happy Mardi Gras everyone!!!)


Tousabella

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Reply #9 on: March 04, 2014, 09:22:54 AM
Boy oh boy!!  Aren't you just a wealth of interesting information this morning!!  Thank you, and the effects you have are super....I love the idea of it 'staying' on the paper....Thank you, Lynn, and your picture sure shows the advantage of this.....it's a great job.

Retta

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Happychappy

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Reply #10 on: March 04, 2014, 09:27:42 AM
Wow, Lynn, a lovely painting and very interesting exercise.  I hope Dennis gets to it soon for it sounds so interesting.  Patricia
Patricia
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Steven

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Reply #11 on: March 04, 2014, 11:33:00 AM
Nina, "Soft Pastels" is the term given to chalk-like pastels - though the artists' quality pastels have no chalk in them, instead they are made from pigment and gum arabic. Gum Arabic is the same binder that is in watercolour paint - it's water-soluble.

So - if you use them on canvas that has an acrylic-based gesso on it, the pastels will either not stick at all, rub right off, and/or be subject to damage by atmospheric humidity and airborne pollution.

In other words, find a better surface - any paper that has a slight texture or "tooth" for the pastels to stick will work great.
Steven

We are all tourists in this life...  it's not the destination we should strive for, it's all in the journey!


May lynn

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Reply #12 on: March 04, 2014, 04:05:14 PM
Dear Lynn p or Steven;

Do you know of a website(s) where either of these techniques can be viewed?


May lynn


lynn p.

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Reply #13 on: March 04, 2014, 05:51:32 PM
Maylynn, here is one although if you google alcohol underpainting for pastel you will find several entries as it is a common technique:


http://kemstudios.blogspot.com/2012/02/easy-underpainting-techniquealcohol.html


Steven

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Reply #14 on: March 04, 2014, 05:51:52 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0zweHylWDQ a short look at how Richard Mckinley does it
Steven

We are all tourists in this life...  it's not the destination we should strive for, it's all in the journey!


 

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