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Author Topic: "Tooth" on the paper  (Read 1187 times)

Tousabella

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on: January 17, 2014, 01:54:39 PM
Does the #  poundage  of the paper make a difference for the amount of tooth on the paper?  Is there a formula for buying paper that will tell you the roughness of the paper?
I'm in question as I've found the back of some of my w/c paper has more tooth than the painting side!
Thanks all...I know that my regular w/c paper I used for the last two lessons only let me put two and maybe three layers of chalk on.
Retta

  I can't change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.
                                                    Jimmy Dean


musika

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Reply #1 on: January 17, 2014, 02:06:54 PM
Retta, the poundage e.g. 140 pound (or 300gsm outside North America) only tells you the weight of the paper. This is obvious by it's thickness, in the real world. The amount of tooth is shown by the type of watercolour paper.
HP (hot pressed) NOT (cold pressed) or rough. HP is the smoothest.
Ray


ImBatman

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Reply #2 on: January 17, 2014, 02:10:33 PM
Bella, the weight of the paper doesn't really indicate the amount of tooth. I know I have a few different sketch books of different brands but same paper weight and the three are all different textures.

I believe it really comes down to the brand maker and the methods they use and what product they are trying to create.

Watercolour paper is a little different because it is intentionally graded though into 3 types.

But maybe Dennis or Nolan could give a better answer.

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


Tousabella

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Reply #3 on: January 17, 2014, 07:32:43 PM
Thanks Ray and B'man.  I'm using cold press, and, as you, B'man, each brand seems to have a different roughness. Ho hum....I'll just keep trying.
BTW B'man....nice Xmas present....looks like it has a seat belt!!   :2funny:
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 07:34:25 PM by Bella 1 »
Retta

  I can't change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.
                                                    Jimmy Dean


Alice L Lemke

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Reply #4 on: January 17, 2014, 09:18:19 PM
Because I'm so new to watercolor, I just ordered this sampler of 16 different full-sized 140 lb. sheets from Daniel Smith, plus 3 loose sheets of different #300lb paper, that's enough for 38 1/2 size paintings.

http://www.danielsmith.com/Item--i-285-510-004

I'm on their email list, so after the 20% discount I got all 19 sheets for about $100.  I now get to try out all kinds of weights and textures to see the effects and what would be the best for me.  I would suggest you try it, too.  I usually use Arches (Caslon) 300 lb cold press blocks for the lessons here, and I have found that the texture is rougher than most cold press, if you like that. 

You just have to try everything and see what you like the best.

My best painting so far was painted on the back of a "stinker!"
« Last Edit: January 17, 2014, 09:28:37 PM by Alice L Lemke »
"There's no such thing as 'genius,' it's hard work and aptitude!" Ed Whitney quoted by Tony Couch, 2014


Steven

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Reply #5 on: January 17, 2014, 10:31:32 PM
Bella you are looking for pastel paper right?  Water color paper works well enough, but some of the paper prepared specifically for pastel drawing/painting has a more pronounced tooth.  You can also prep just about any surface with colorfix, sort of a prepared acrylic grounding with pumice that comes in a jar and gives even glass surfaces "tooth" to grab pastel.  What most people do is use archival illustrators board and mat board "painted" with a coat of the colorfix.  That way they get nice colored background and large canvases.

Canson Mi-Teintes Pastel Pad is a readily available paper that comes in many colors and a few sizes is what I'll be using mostly, and unless we need a really rough surface for the class, I'll be using the smooth side.
Steven

We are all tourists in this life...  it's not the destination we should strive for, it's all in the journey!


Tousabella

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Reply #6 on: January 18, 2014, 12:28:05 PM
Thank you, Steven n Alice.  Yes, it's for pastels I was thinking about. The last two lessons were on regular 140 w/c paper.
Alice, I get the emails from Daniels, too, but the postage is a killer.
I'll just have to stay "in the hunt".  :detective: 
Thanks for the input.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2014, 12:32:07 PM by Bella 1 »
Retta

  I can't change the direction of the wind, but I can adjust my sails to always reach my destination.
                                                    Jimmy Dean


ImBatman

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Reply #7 on: January 18, 2014, 01:57:40 PM
Bella,
The speed my brush attacks the canvas at I may need to install one!!!  :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


 

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