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Author Topic: Discouraged,  (Read 1323 times)

BeaSue

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on: December 21, 2013, 03:20:43 PM
Have you ever hit a patch where nothing works? I have torn up my last four paintings. I will work on some lessons after the holidays, but it does get discouraging when nothing seems to work and all your training feels as if it has gotten up and walked out of the room.
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


dennis

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Reply #1 on: December 21, 2013, 04:55:44 PM
Before you tear up any of your drawings out of frustration - take them to the tap and sponge off all the paint. This will leave a light ghost image of what once was there. Wipe off all the surplus water and put it on a towel and        wrap the other half over it. Put a flat board over this and then some weights.


Leave it for a day and then do the same again with another dry towel. Do this until it is completely dry.


Now it is much easier to do the painting again as you have a nice under-painting waiting for you.  :flowers:


I just cannot remember when I last tore up a painting - many, many moons ago in the very dim distant past :2funny:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #2 on: December 21, 2013, 05:01:26 PM
Susan! Are you living on my boat?!  :heeha: Yes it does happen. You know that you know the technique....the first layer is done...beautiful! Now all you have to do is deepen the colour, lay it over, blend it out....  :faint:       :tongue:

Happens sometimes when mixing colours. Enfuriating  :tickedoff: That is when I usually take a small break and do some sketching/drawing for a bit. Sometimes the break just seems to put everything back into perspective, so to speak.  :whistle:   Sometimes a break is as good as a rest. Not to worry, you'll be fine...sometimes we just push a bit too hard, too fast. Not that I would know that.....  ;D

 :1hug:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Val

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Reply #3 on: December 21, 2013, 05:02:26 PM
That's too funny Dennis.... I was just about to add...next step is the hose on the back deck!!  :2funny:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #4 on: December 21, 2013, 05:37:23 PM
we all get discouraged and have times when nothing seems to work. just hang in there, as you gain more and more experience, these times will gradually become fewer and fewer :flowers:


BeaSue

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Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 06:01:28 PM
Thank you, Dennis, Val, and Nolan...for the encouragement and the reclamation tip, Dennis. I guess I have to remember that this time last year I had yet to do my first watercolor painting. And that this year I am giving two of my favorites to my children as Christmas presents.
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


Val

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Reply #6 on: December 21, 2013, 06:32:53 PM
this time last year I had yet to do my first watercolor painting. And that this year I am giving two of my favorites to my children as Christmas presents.

Now that's a landmark in it's own right!  O0
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Alice L Lemke

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Reply #7 on: December 21, 2013, 08:48:12 PM
Sue, forward motion in learning is not a straight line!  Sometimes you zig or zag, sometimes you go backwards for a bit and then jump forward without even realizing it.  You are a fabulous artist and sometimes learning new things makes the other ones that you learned before seem to stall while you assimilate the new medium or technique into your repertoire, just like learning songs. 

If you really hate something, get a scrubber - I have a bunch by Silver Brush Company (from TheBrushGuys.com). Cheap Joes carries another brand.  Here's a video of Joe demonstrating:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JcVXP09-S40.  I have wiped out entire paintings like this, then turned them over and used the back.  I just pulled up my new Yosemite painting and discovered a failed one from a watercolor class that I absolutely hated on the back.  Not only did I hate the paintings, I did not like the artist's teaching method. He had the notion that if you "failed" then you were learning, but really he set us up to fail and he just made me frustrated and quit. I destroyed all 3 paintings I did. What a waste of money and time that was.

Also, remember this is Christmas and a pretty stressful time for women who have to organize everything!  Take it easy, have some hot chocolate and watch a movie.

Alice
"There's no such thing as 'genius,' it's hard work and aptitude!" Ed Whitney quoted by Tony Couch, 2014


BeaSue

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Reply #8 on: December 22, 2013, 04:30:29 AM
Alice, thanks so much for your reply. There is wisdom in your words. Funny thing is that I teach creative writing, and I use similar words of encouragement with my writing studenta. But sometimes it is more difficult to apply those words to oneself, and really beleive them!

The other thing is that at this very early stage in my painting development, I am trying to absorb learning about two different types of watercolor painting: loose painting and fine, detailed painting (multiple glazes). I like both, but I find myself leaning more toward the latter. This can be a challenge.

Finally, I am discovering that I need to be more disciplined in my painting, and try to do a little something--if not every day, then, at least, every few days. Gosh--that's the same thing I tell my writers!  :uglystupid2:
--Susan

"Creativity is harnessing universality and making it flow through your eyes." Peter Koestenbaum


stoney

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Reply #9 on: January 07, 2014, 01:14:42 PM
Anything worthwhile takes time.  The greater the difficulty the greater the satisfaction when completed.

Art is life long learning.  As with anything the start is the most difficult time.  When you're dealing with different subjects, mediums, and teaching styles that increases the difficulty level and the time to figure out 'which way is up'.

Michelangelo's said to have protested on his death bed; "that he had just begun to see".

I saw, and bought, a work by my now dead oil instructor of a sun set with trees and a horse and rider silhouetted.  He told me it had taken him 50 years to learn to paint that vibrant sky.

The sky looks simple.  Looks is the operative word.

Even the old masters weren't successful with every painting.

Things do 'gel'.  In time, you'll find yourself combining steps.

Before you can paint something you have to be able to see it as an artist does.  The subtle changes in tone, the ability to generate the proper color in the proper spot, and to see the three dimensionality in a two dimensional reference or to simplify a view you're painting.

When learning to ride a bicycle, you don't start out with the 'Tour de France'.  You start out being pushed on a tricycle then learn to pedal and work your way up.

Check out books on painting at your local library. Read them and work on examples that are broken down into steps.

Many recommend for your first 100 paintings working 5 x 7 and 8 x 10 inch canvases or hard board.  The reason for this is so you get used to the process of starting and finishing works.

The time a work takes is the time a work takes.  If it seems like forever, that's ok.  You're becoming familiar with the multiple mechanics which makes up a finished work.  Visually simple works break the process into 'bite size' pieces.

Artists quickly realize the standard color wheel doesn't work.  They also find out that it might be 'impossible' to duplicate a color.  They're very frustrated as they've no idea 'why' they're having such trouble.

The first thing to realize is there are no 'pure' paint colors.  The other thing is color leans to the 'warm' or the 'cool' side of a color.

The second thing to learn is what you're manipulating with color are the impurities in the color!

The book "Blue and Yellow Don't Make Green" by Michael Wilcox allowed me to eliminate the 'trial and error' (mostly error) of color mixing. I'm faster and more accurate which means a hefty decrease in wasted paint. That saves a lot of expensive paint.

You'll get there.  Examine paintings online or at galleries and museums.  Take a look at how the artist utilized textures and color.  Examine how they utilized light and shadow.

In books with reference photos and the finished work, look at how the artist constructed, moved, eliminated, added, and simplified the work and how the design moves your eye through the painting (eye path).

Cheers


Sacgal/Sharon

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Reply #10 on: April 10, 2014, 07:40:32 AM
A successful painter friend of mine told me to NEVER throw away anything I'm working on. She said use other medium, such as acrylics or rice paper - it's amazing how a not so good painting can become salable.  Also, I think we're much more critical of our paintings than others.  And I've seen your work, Susan - I highly doubt it's as bad as you think. You're such a talented artist!
Cheers,
Sharon


NHC50

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Reply #11 on: April 10, 2014, 08:57:32 AM
Bingo!!! I was just there 2 weeks ago. I was working on a watercolor lesson. The one with the boat on the beach. I got the background to dark. All most threw it away. Then I heard this little voice. I think it was Dennis don't throw it away. Wash it off.   :2funny: :2funny:
Which I still have to do. And then pick up the brush an go at it again. Susan you will get there.  :1hug:

Nina  :flowers:
Be the kind of woman that when your feet hit the ground each morning, the devil says. "OH NO, SHES UP!"


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: May 25, 2014, 12:17:39 PM
I'm stoppoing painting altogether for quite a long time. I have to. I've gotten to where I'm just bored to death because i backtrack on things constantly.
Yes, it's very frustrating. Imagine doing a one brush stroke painting. It would be easy to let it go weather it's "good" or "bad", wouldn't it.
Now, you do a little more than one brush mark....the more you do, the more difficult it becomes to let things go and not backtrack on things..wiping off, etc.
I usually spend about 40 plus hours on each one. It's a bad habit. I've spent 20 alone on some eyes and it didnt' help it one bit really. 20 getting to where a painting is as "good as it'll get", even though not satisified at all...then another doing patchwork and turp scrubbing.
Not to mention boredom beyond belief.
It's hearbreaking, i know. You THINK you know something, then as you change things, it's not working.
But backing up,   the LESS you fool with it, i suppose it's best to  ACCEPT it and move on to another one. OR..........it'll be very very hard to accept  if you push it too far and with no results. 90 per cent of mine were pushed with little outcome. AND i still do it.
I'll take several months off, and i'm not kidding this time.....then, take the weekly classes from Nolan and see if i can learn something. The bigger picture tells me that his subjects are carefully selected, and i think that is very very important and understated. The main subject, with surroundings, but get that main subject done first, and subordinate the REST.....it's not important. Their's really no solid answers to art. Every piece is different and has it's own problems. You have to look at the person behind it too..........everyone is different and reacts differently.. i have alot of anxiety and get frustrated super fast.
If you were building a house and you SAW a bent nail hanging out, we all want to change that, but that's the problem, before you know it, you're spending hours on end, straightening every nail out, and you're bored before you even got the house half way started.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2014, 01:06:49 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #13 on: May 25, 2014, 01:13:18 PM
A successful painter friend of mine told me to NEVER throw away anything I'm working on. She said use other medium, such as acrylics or rice paper - it's amazing how a not so good painting can become salable.  Also, I think we're much more critical of our paintings than others.  And I've seen your work, Susan - I highly doubt it's as bad as you think. You're such a talented artist!
You're good at explaining things with art Tony.    No one ever said you can ruin a painting by adding too little. Too much..yes. I had my Mother and sisters see my art works for the first time...sister said, about a dozen (out of a hundred) were exceptional, the rest were "good" she said.
I still have yet to accept things and humble myself by leaving the misguided brush strokes alone and move on. Yes, it's VERY dissapointing to do it, but ALOT more to do 3 hundred of them and call it quits because all of them collectively didn't add up to much. (banging my head against the wall!)
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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