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Author Topic: draw from scratch  (Read 1331 times)

Maryna

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on: December 12, 2013, 05:24:05 AM
I have followed numerous drawing courses, went through several books, watched many youtube videos... but now I feel very confused  :confused: and doubting myself  :'( . I always thought I could draw and I can basically draw loads of stuff especially if I have an original drawing in front of me. I have also done some other plein air drawings and that went good.

BUT recently I started following this channel on youtube also about drawing and it starts off with basic shapes and how to build up from there. I am really struggling with this. Does this mean I am nothing more than a copy artist or fake? Or does this mean I have to go back all the way to the beginning and just get loads and loads and loads of practice? :help:

Thoughts on this??
« Last Edit: December 12, 2013, 05:25:46 AM by Maryna »
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


lynn p.

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Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 05:46:11 AM
Maryna--I would really like to know Nolan and Dennis' thoughts on some of this also.  Obviously if you are drawing what you see well then the basics taught in drawing many shapes in different light must be being applied in some way.  I was signed up for a beginning drawing class last semester at the art school here.  I decided not to take the class because I too heard that for three months we draw spheres and cubes and I thought I might jump out of my skin but now I wonder if I need to go back and do this?  I have seen your drawing and no you are not a fake.  You can't fake drawing!


Val

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Reply #2 on: December 12, 2013, 06:12:13 AM
Maryna, I met a wonderful portrait sketch artist a couple of years ago. He drew beautiful portraits freehand with the subject usually in front of him. I asked him about how he managed it. When I asked about drawing from circles and shapes, he looked at me, laughed and said, "If I start like that all of my people look like balloon men!"

Some people just have a natural flow when it comes to drawing. Some of us need those circles and shapes just to keep us in proportion (which doesn't always work  ;D ), and some of us can just sit and draw what is there. Look at those classes as nothing more than building blocks. Just like using building blocks...you don't always need all of the shapes.

You are anything but a fake or failure my love, and dare let anyone say you are.  :knuppel2:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Maryna

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Reply #3 on: December 12, 2013, 06:28:16 AM
Val, your story about the other artist really makes me feel so much better. Thanks  ;)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


scouserl41

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Reply #4 on: December 12, 2013, 08:30:05 AM
Maryna,
The thing about Youtube and similar "Mass Market" classes (Even PB has to deal with this) is that the presenter has no idea what level of skill the viewer has. It can be anything from the first time the viewer picked up a pencil to an acomplished artist trying to improve techniques. So they all have to start with the basics and build up from there. You are obviously in the acomplished artist trying to improve your techniques catagory and see the basic stuff as irrelevant.
Don't dispair! Keep searching Youtube for more advanced stuff, search for specific subjects "Drawing Trees" "Pencil Portraits" there is so much stuff on YouTube I bet you'll find something relevant.
And keep practicing, figure out what you want to improve and make a habit of drawing that one thing EVERY DAY.
I have to admit I have slipped lately but when I started trying to draw faces I made it a habit to draw at least one face every day. I'd even draw sketch the faces of the newscasters on the morning news. It all helps.
Brian
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


liz

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Reply #5 on: December 12, 2013, 09:52:35 AM
Val, I liked what you said about the sketch artist.  I want to draw 'naturally'.  As it turned out my black and white printer does not produce good quality pictures and my tracing paper wasn't the best.  It helped to have a general idea of the outline of the dog's face and where to place the eyes, nose and mouth and I was on my own for the rest of the details in the drawing dogs course.  But I want to strive toward free hand drawing as all of my art has been up to now.


I hope I can eventually get comfortable with drawing and sketch something every day like Brian.

-Liz


Val

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Reply #6 on: December 12, 2013, 10:21:08 AM
Should you have any doubts at all .... just look through your drawings folder.  O0 :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #7 on: December 12, 2013, 12:52:24 PM
there are many different facets to art and each medium. For example you get different subjects like abstract or landscapes. You get different methods like painting with a brush vs painting with a finger vs an air brush. There are a zillion different techniques like drawing your image onto the canvas freehand vs using the grid method vs using a projector. I can can go on forever, art is that complex.

some things are easy like throwing paint at an abstract painting's canvas or tracing an image from an overhead projector and you can learn how to do them instantly. Other things are more complex like painting a portrait from life or drawing freehand. It can take you years to master these.

Are you a better artist if you can draw freehand perfectly and not visualise an abstract, or is it the other way around? It all depends on the artist:

What do YOU want to achieve with your art?

Once you have decided what YOU want to be able to do, then go out and put in the effort to achieve it. This may require a lot of perseverance and practice, eg.

you may learn how to paint an eye in an hour. It may take you another year to learn how to mix your colours correctly so that the eye looks realistic.

Were you a failure along the way because you couldn't paint the eye realistically? Of course not!


liz

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Reply #8 on: December 12, 2013, 03:05:28 PM
Well, Nolan, you packed a lot of experience, art knowledge, and wisdom in your comment!


This is what it means to me:
A person must have a goal in mind and measure that with his present skills and what is needed to accomplish his goal.


A young(er) person has more options than an older person in how much time he can spend developing himself. 


And since time is a factor, how much time and energy a person has also determines how far he can go in developing his interest.

And also, money may not be too big a factor if one can paint on seed pods and coconuts!!!



And lastly, how motivated a person is and how much support he has surely makes all the difference in the world!!!
That's my take on this. . .
 :thankyou: , Nolan!
« Last Edit: December 12, 2013, 03:07:47 PM by Liz »


ImBatman

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Reply #9 on: December 12, 2013, 07:37:38 PM
Maryna, you are a failure at anything only if you put your tools away, don't utilise the skills you have learned and the talents you have inside.



Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


Maryna

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Reply #10 on: December 13, 2013, 07:30:11 AM
Thanks for everyone's feedback and support  :hug:
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


 

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