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Author Topic: Valuing art  (Read 8524 times)

Val

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Reply #15 on: July 26, 2011, 04:00:38 AM
If everyone just painted the type of pictures that people would buy we would have missed a great deal in the evolution of both technique and subject matter. I can only imagine the commentary that went on when the impressionistic movement began. The same can be said for the cubist, abstract, etc....  Would we in retrospect all be nothing more that renaissance painters? Just a thought.

I agree that a piece or art (or anything else for that matter) is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. The question then is.. what made that person WANT to buy it? Is it the talent/technique displayed by the artist? OR is it the article they read by a somewhat brilliant advertising/marketing firm?

How many times has any of us bought an item because the marketing made it sound so incredible you had to have it....only to find it really wasn't all it was cracked up to be? Good marketing? You betcha!

So...talent or marketing...or perhaps both. What in today's world makes ones reputation?

I have to go by a matter of what appeals to me personally, what is it really worth to me, and am I willing to pay it? That's my two cents!  :wave:


Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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liz

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Reply #16 on: July 26, 2011, 11:13:04 AM
The Value of Art and the Artist:

Very good, Val! :clap:  I would like to be the artist who is guided by my heart, even as a buyer of art should be guided by his heart.

Here is my heart story:  my brother-in-law remodeled his guest room some years back and his wife replaced the oil painting on a wall with a tapestry hanging.  That's okay; their choice of change.  Anyway, my old (first) seascape ended up stored in their garage, which we mutually agreed when found, would be returned to me!  I was overjoyed to see an 'old friend' and remembered the hours we spent together.  I'll show it to you soon as I get help posting again.  Both it and I have 'aged' but recognized each other!  No one could separate us again for any amount of money!  How do you like my story, Dennis, Nolan? :hug: :flowers: :smitten: :smitten:


nolan

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Reply #17 on: July 31, 2011, 12:09:02 PM
Yeah, I must agree that there are one or two paintings that I wouldn't mind getting back myself. The problem is that we as artists do get emotionally involved with our paintings so for us the painting is often worth more that what people are willing to pay.

Just to clarify my original post : how much of the painting price can be attributed to the name on the painting, ie. how well the artist is known, as opposed to the actual quality of the execution of the work.


Val

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Reply #18 on: July 31, 2011, 03:08:41 PM
Sara, Sara, Sara .... its easy to get one's wires crossed with all the subject matter on the site. Not the  :idiot2: , just a bit  :confused: by it all!  ;D  Everyone wins on this site...can't help but do so.  :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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Kelley

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Reply #19 on: August 14, 2011, 03:57:15 PM
I hope I'm not off topic, but I've seen really good art at auctions, yard sales and classified ads. I've also gone to galleries and wondered why the stuff on the wall wasn't at yard sales.  From what I've read, the art market is a fickle thing that seems to fluctuate like the stock market.  If you have commission an agent things can go well..or not.  You can have your art appraised at whatever you tell the appraiser, but I think it's value is based on what it's previously been sold for.  So, if I have sold a painting for say $3,000 then I can expect to use that as a ballpark figure for my next.  Same goes for anything painted for example by Leonardo DaVinci or any other master.  Their art has sold for millions and you would never see anything they've done for less.  So, the bottom line I think it is based on the person's reputable name.  Put your   :twoguns:  away.  Don't shoot me if I'm off mark.
Kelley


Val

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Reply #20 on: August 14, 2011, 05:29:40 PM
Thats ok Kelley....  :hammer: everyone is entitled to their opinion.  ;D
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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nolan

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Reply #21 on: August 14, 2011, 08:40:47 PM
Good analysis there Kelley O0


Kelley

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Reply #22 on: August 15, 2011, 07:51:11 AM
Thank you Nolan.  I feel wiser just being here.   :smart:
Kelley


Val

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Reply #23 on: August 15, 2011, 01:46:21 PM
Shift to the top of the class.  :smart:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


anita

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Reply #24 on: September 15, 2011, 02:15:08 PM
There was an interesting programme on the BBC not so long ago about the 10 most valuable paintings sold at auction.  The presenter also made the point that as well as the artist's name and reputation the value of the painting could also shoot up depending on who the previous owners were. :idiot2:

I was surprised when visiting a few galleries recently how little original art work there was actually for sale ... most of it was just prints .... and expensive at that.  I don't really get how they can justify that but I suppose there must be people out there willing to pay it.

Anita


nolan

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Reply #25 on: September 15, 2011, 07:01:40 PM
what seems to be popular lately is making prints on canvas and then signing in personally with paint  :D


Val

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Reply #26 on: September 16, 2011, 01:42:16 AM
Hope they're being honest with the uneducated buyer. I've seen some pretty convincing w/c done similar.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


bill dennis

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Reply #27 on: December 06, 2011, 07:23:59 AM
Just seen a catalogue of an auction house selling Australian art by well known names, outrageus prices being asked but not I understand being received,the majority of paintings were being offered by large corporations and financial institutions,they are told who's going to be the next 'big thing' and invest pushing prices up to silly levels and making the artist famous, strangely these artists would struggle to win the publics vote even though some are called Pop artists, which I understood to mean Popular art am I wrong?.


claude

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Reply #28 on: December 06, 2011, 08:19:10 AM
Art is ..... art. Unfortunatly. I was a member of a amateur theater group for many years. Some of the actors in this troupe were much better than most of the people we see on TV or films. When we put on a show, if we had 65 spectators, we were so happy our shorts busted. If we put on a show and added a TV personality to the cast, we got 300 spectators, even if this "star" was a schmuck!

Take a walk in LA and you will see hundreds of very good actors begging for a "dime for coffee". People line up for big names. Would you run to see  a movie produced by Joe Boosenburger starring Cathy Whatsherface and Jim Whatchamikallhim?

I am an avid reader. I ALWAYS pick out writers I know: James Patterson, Ian Rankin etc. Only when the BIG names have no new books will I reach for an unknown.

Too bad wine is not art. Do you go by taste or by price??? Don't answer, I know the answer to this one.

So why should painting be different. No matter who you are, no matter what you know, red paint splashed on a canvas is red paint splashed on a canvas no matter who the splasher is.

In other words there is impressionism, cubism, realism, classicism but lots and lots of bullshitism.
If not now, when? If not me, who?


nolan

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Reply #29 on: December 06, 2011, 08:48:43 AM
It's all in the marketing isn't it - get your name known.

I have planned on doing a course on marketing your art on the site next year if there is enough interest.


 

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