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Author Topic: What life event motivated or squelched your desire to do art?  (Read 2063 times)

Fencepost

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For me...I was excited about art in third grade. My teacher encouraged me to experiment. I drew a horse, not well, but finished the drawing by gluing shavings from the pencil sharpener onto the ground areas where dirt would be. She was delighted! I clearly remembered one lesson about color, and how we could create a scene with actual colors, or use colors that represented how we felt about what we were seeing.

Between third and fourth grade,we moved to another town. The scenery on the drive to our new home was spectacular...over the Rocky Mountains. When school started, we were given the usual assignment of drawing a picture of what we did over the summer. I did a large crayon drawing of our car driving through an area of forest. I did the trees in reds, blues, yellows, oranges, Purples, and even a few green. Turning in that assignment led to testing for color blindness and counseling about using appropriate colors. It wasn't until adulthood that I was willing to try my hand at art again, and then just with graphite. I've only added color in recent years.

Your story?
Judie

keep knocking and the joy inside will eventually open a window and look out to see who’s there   -rumi


nolan

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Reply #1 on: August 06, 2013, 12:15:45 PM
In 1995 I was starting up a wedding video business and called it Silver Palm Videos (for some bizarre reason  :2funny: ), anyhow I wanted to print some t-shirts that we could wear and needed a logo. I looked all over for a suitable palm tree image on the computer and couldn't find one. Dennis was too far away to ask him to draw one (the days before Internet :crazy2: ), so out of desperation I decided to try and draw one myself.

It actually turned out not too shabby - I was impressed with it any way :D

Excitedly I called Dennis to tell him about the tree I had drawn and he said that he was having a pencil drawing seminar the next weekend, why don't I come and join it. Being an apprentice at that time poor Dennis even had to stump up the petrol money and buy my pencils for me  ::)

I absolutely loved the course and my results so continued drawing.  :yippee:

PS - The printers promptly went and lost my prized palm tree drawing so I never got my t-shirts printed after all. :o


Val

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Reply #2 on: August 06, 2013, 01:21:45 PM
Ah....so those were the beginnings of our humble cameraman!  :cost: You've come a long way baby!  ;D


Judie, I sympathize with your early experience. It disgusts me when 'teachers' don't like what you're doing and try to force you into the mold of conformity.  :knuppel2:

My 'rebirth' as it were into the art world came about when I met a lady artist in Trinidad. She was selling prints as well as some originals to help finance their cruising life. I started talking to her, and she told me she hadn't painted in some time. I asked her why...to make a long story short, I badgered her into starting again..and she in turn sparked the desire to start me drawing and painting again. We used to have 'painting days' on our boat (as it has more room), and the odd day we'd break out our recorders and my penny whistle.

Even though we don't see each other very often, it's been almost two years now. We still keep in touch when we can and badger each other with praise, lies ( :2funny: )and encouragements to keep on painting.

AND THEN   :eek: ... I saw a painting of a little boat on the hard painted by none other than our very own
Dennis L. Clark !!  :heeha: I posed the query ... How do you keep the white of that hull looking so bright?  :confused: It was explained to me quite simply  :) and I got an invitation to visit Paintbasket!  The rest is history!!  ;D :yippee: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


dennis

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Reply #3 on: August 06, 2013, 05:42:08 PM
It all started during WWII. As kids, about all we had to read was Comics. We used to collect them and then swap them around. One day I picked up a pencil and a sheet of ruled writing paper and started to copy Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck and others. This was in 1944 and my later father (Magistrate) was stationed in Caledon, Cape Province, South Africa.

He eventually saw my drawing attempts and started to encourage me and to keep at it. I am forever grateful for his encouragement in whatever I did. Although not an artist himself, I give him and my Lord credit for what I am today.

All this led to me starting to paint in watercolours in 1946. Most of my school text books were covered with pencil sketches of all subjects (done during class - naughty me ;) ) He also encouraged me in Calligraphy and in the end I have Illuminated addresses behind church plaques, etc, as well a one sealed in the Voortrekker Monument in Pretoria (done during my last years at school). I also did a long Illuminated Scroll in German for the Lutheran Church in Vanderbijlpark, SA.

All this was the beginning of my art career, and culminated in Jan 1993 when I retired from engineering and became a fulltime professional artist/teacher. The rest is History  :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Fencepost

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Reply #4 on: August 06, 2013, 06:00:31 PM
Fascinating stories Nolan, Val, and Dennis. It seems that the flame gets lighted in unexpected ways.  :smitten:
I'd love to see that t-shirt Nolan. I'll bet it was great, but if your business had succeeded, we wouldn't have you!
Judie

keep knocking and the joy inside will eventually open a window and look out to see who’s there   -rumi


Germa

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Reply #5 on: August 07, 2013, 12:42:14 AM
December 2011 my hb got a box with oil paints form his employer, nice, but we put it in a cupboard forgot about it, and I thought of it again in December 2012.
I tried to paint with it for some weeks, started to find some tutorials or explanations, found PaintBasket, and the rest is history. ;)


doina

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Reply #6 on: August 07, 2013, 11:18:02 AM
I started painting when I came to this retirement community in early 2012, by painting ceramics for the community store. The person in charge with Arts and Crafts activities suggested to try watercolor classes because my color combinations and shadings were more that what was needed on ceramic painting. Next class in April 2012 I signed in and to my surprise, I did a good job. I continued with the classes, and in the spare time I went to the library and borrowed books on watercolor. I surprised her again, and she suggested to take some classes on drawing at the community college. I took a 6 weeks course that I enjoyed. That was December 2012. Then searching the Internet I found PG and the rest is history. Thanks so much Dennis for the very complete classes that you present to us. I enjoy everyone of them. In the mean time I am trying to do some of my own paintings from pictures. Two months ago I subscribed to the "let's draw" course. It is of humongous help. I can draw free hand now, and I do understand better the tonal values. Thank you Nolan for the class. Doina
Doina


Northbound

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Reply #7 on: August 20, 2013, 12:28:00 PM
For me it was my love of horses as a child.  I would sit and draw horses, barns, fields, etc. for hours, plotting, planning, wishing, hoping that somehow those drawings would turn into a real horse.  My impassioned drawings did not move my parents into converting our garage into a barn, no matter how impressive my work was, however.

All through my schooling I did the typical art classes.  After I got married and then children, I didn't do much of anything at all but keep up with work and family.  I eventually ran away from home with my children and lost 180 pounds of dead weight (also known as my ex-husband =D).  As a single mom, I had even less time for myself.

It wasn't until I met the man of my dreams, love of my life, that I started trying painting again.  He is my inspiration.

So one could say, my desire to do art grew out of love, both times. 


jrhall036

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Reply #8 on: August 21, 2013, 05:34:46 AM
During my childhood, my younger brother showed talent in various artistic mediums. His talent was squelched by my father, a scientist, who thought that his children needed to learn how to earn a living instead of following our hearts. He was really hard on my brother, so much so that I would never even consider trying any type of visual art. Dad did pay for my piano lessons, but that was as far as he would go with any of us in the arts.

When I got out on my own, I took some classes in Interior Design at the local community college. Most of the drawings I did at that time were blueprints and some computer-aided designs (CADD). When I turned in my weekly projects for the class, though, I would usually draw my cover that was included in the written section of my homework, and my design teacher always complimented them. But then I was offered a scholarship in music, which paid my way through school for the next 12 years. I had to go where the money was, or I probably never would have finished school.

I got married shortly after grad school, and being married to an archaeologist means lots of travel and living in very remote areas. In places like these, there really aren't a lot of music jobs available, so I started researching and publishing (as a university alumni, I still have access to online research databases from my school). My current publication is a 9-volume edited and annotated collection of writings by the 19th-century virtuoso pianist and composer, Franz Liszt. Liszt used paintings as his inspiration for creating, both as a performer and composer. It was that connection--Liszt's obsession with painting and famous painters--that encouraged me to look outside of music so that I could understand his artistic conception.

A Google search brought me to Paint Basket. In that first lesson, Dennis mentioned knowing a concert pianist who could carry on a conversation at the same time his hands were playing the music. Liszt used to do that same thing. At that moment, I knew I had found the right place to be. Isn't it funny how these kinds of things just miraculously work out?   
Cheers,
Jani


Val

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Reply #9 on: August 21, 2013, 06:15:24 AM
Just shows Jani, you were meant to be here! Lucky for us!  :yippee: :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Fencepost

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Reply #10 on: August 21, 2013, 06:42:52 AM
Just loving these stories! Such fascinating paths leading to this wonderful place. Unique journeys, unique artists creating unique art.  :congrats:
Judie

keep knocking and the joy inside will eventually open a window and look out to see who’s there   -rumi


mea hamo pena

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Reply #11 on: August 21, 2013, 06:51:31 AM
Jani,

Someone mentioned PASSION for art the other day.  Wow, you really have it, Jani.

What a fascinating journey your life has been!

PB is more than a website to us, right?  It's a life changer.

aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


scouserl41

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Reply #12 on: August 21, 2013, 07:21:56 AM
I don't remember when I started drawing things but I seem to have had a pencil around most of my life. When I started High School in UK I was an airplane nut. The Art Teacher Jim Chapman (know to all as Charlie Chaplin) was an ex RN fighter pilot from WW2. HERO WORSHIP! About the only thing I liked about High School was art.
After High School I started working in a shipyard and worked my way up into the design office as a Draughtsman. I didn't paint anymore but sketched occassionally. I never kept anything I drew.
45 years went by and our first Granddaughter was born 6000 miles away. We visited and exchanged pictures, watched her growing via Skype and naturally we love her soooo much.
I decided to try and draw her face. It was awful. After several attempts I tried YouTube and learned a few things. Then my wife found a free portrait class at the local community college for senior citizens. I did that for a couple of months and made some progress going from pencil sketches to oil paints which I'd never tried before, but couldn't get skin colors right. A YouTube search brought up the Color Buster which I bought. That led me to PB and the rest as they say!
I've made so much progress with PB and I'm on the cusp if trying to paint Kaitlynd again.
I'll finish my portrait excersize first then THE BIG ONE!
Don't draw more in the morning than you can erase in the afternoon (Old Draughtsman's saying)


scribe

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Reply #13 on: August 22, 2013, 04:10:35 AM
I loved art as a kid. Actually did an oil painting on of all things- paper- when I was nine (still have it squirreled away somewhere and it is in one piece). My Mother was very tolerant until I spilled a bottle of India ink on her new chair, then I was confined to another room. Once I hit high school, the theme was learn something with which you can earn a living - so my art went away. Then came college, marriage, children and life. . .

We were at the Mid-South Fair years later and came upon a booth for the Memphis Calligraphy Guild. I joined shortly after and have been doing that for the last 23 years. Love it!!!! Some of my customers wanted art work with their quotes. My art was hit or miss. Took some drawing courses and did very well, but it went by the wayside as I wasn't called upon to do it very often.

We moved to this town 7 years ago and my calligraphy business is only for fun now. I did join a local art league. It is a wonderful bunch of people who don't look down on calligraphers. they actually had me teach a couple of classes for them. Anyway, I saw what kind of work they were doing and thought "I can do that"  and started trying. Then I found PB on the internet and have really been going to town. As soon as I finish the pencil drawing refresher I will get back to the watercolor. I have thoroughly enjoyed all the lessons and am looking forward to taking more.
Peggy


Annie.

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Reply #14 on: April 10, 2015, 07:03:01 PM
Judie,
I don't know if old topic should be revived, but I find this topic so motivating that I think it is worth a try.

As others post war kids, I was gently dissuaded away from art and philosophy to get into 'real' education... it was portrait as the only way to survive.  It was a good think that I enjoyed science, as there were no other choices that would have been blessed.  Live went on with a passion for the sciences, family, etc. 

But then, of two scientists was born a child who only had eyes for the visual arts.  So from a very young age, our family vacations included museum and gallery visits.  And we learn to enjoy and appreciate arts, including reading about the art and artists, and sitting on afterschool art classes few times per week.

Fast forward... and we were in need of finding classes which were more flexible then those offered for adults in our community.  Found PB, it meet all our criteria... but something magical happen.  While I was sorting this out for my daughter, I came to realized that it would be fun quality time if I should share her passion.  I always thought, maybe one day it would be fun to learn to paint for relaxation.

Then I started watching some classes with her, and the logical approach to learning to draw and paint was like nothing I have seen or heard during all those public and private lessons my daughter took.  Hearing that both Dennis and Nolan were engineers was the final sailing point, they would be logical and not tell me that you are born artist, or you are doom to draw stick people for the rest of your life.

One day... became today, no matter how little time I have to learn painting.  I join the oil club, then decided I needed to learn some basic drawing, so took 'Let's draw course'... sure it took 28 weeks instead of 28 days.  But for the first time in my life, I am not focus on a long term goal or racing against the clock.  I am learning for the pure enjoyment of learning, the sky is the limit, and the satisfaction of creating something 'beautiful' in my eyes (don't laugh, it is all relative, and compare to stick people... my horse is actually recognizable as a horse!!) is the best de-stressor of all.   In addition, I get most of my motivation from the critics I receive from all of you.  And for that I am grateful, and you all made me feel like I belong.

 :hug:

Your turn, what is your story?
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


 

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