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Author Topic: Large Smooth Areas of Tone  (Read 643 times)

patindaytona

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on: July 19, 2013, 09:02:38 AM
I did a drawing of this recently. This is a PHOTOGRAPH..not my drawing. It's a black and white version of a color photo.
I had a problem with the very large area of the leaves. I hatched and smudged, but doing hatching over such large smooth areas is still going to leave inconsistencies..
I think the next time, on something like this I'll use graphite power and take my chances and use a soft paper towel or chamois dabbed into it then smear.  I bought some graphite power at Home Depot recently......i havend't tried it yet though.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #1 on: July 19, 2013, 10:40:02 AM
Beautiful photo Pat. Is it one of yours?

I was told once that I should use graphite powder on my portraits. Let me know how you make out with it. With all the little puffs of breeze I get throughout the day...could be I'd have some interesting effects inside the boat!  :eek: ;D
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 01:47:36 PM
Yes, it's mine Val..the color version is way more beautiful. I did do a color painting of this too...few years back..small one.
These artist's who do things like the powder...how brave can you get! I can see myself already, splotching it up in two min..erasing scrubbing...GOUGHING....
I just got out............................another old one..paintint..3 hours of agonizint carefulness..only to get scared...it might not be any better, so....got turp wiped it all off again. I do that so much with things. It's scary to think it might be going in the wrong direction, so before it's dry and too late...you take the gamble.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Fencepost

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Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 03:17:29 PM
I loved using graphite powder years ago when I was using it. The finger makes a great tool, but you have to be very careful what you touch! The oil in the fingertip seemed to make the graphite apply smoothly and I worked better feeling the paper under my finger. I also used cotton swabs and balls, pastel blenders sponges and chamois. The most important tool I ever discovered was a drawing maul...prevented accidental smudges  :blush:
Judie

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