Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Tips on taking photos of our artwork for posting on Paintbasket  (Read 1630 times)

Lillian

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 :wave:  I'm not sure of there is already a thread for this, but I thought it might be helpful to get some
feedback as to the best way to photo our artwork before posting.  I'd like to hear from you.  Some of you are professional photographers and your input would be appreciated.


Here's what I do -- I only take the photo in daylight hours.  I place the artwork on the floor and hold my camera directly above the work so that it shows as close to square on as possible.  Then I straighten and crop the image on my computer with Windows Live Photo Gallery or Picasa.  I have an oldie but goodie digital camera that's still serving me well  I don't know how to use all the bells and whistles. 
This seems to work for me.  ...any other tips?
"The way to be happy," said Winston Churchill, "is to find something that requires the kind of perfection that's impossible to achieve and spend the rest of your life trying to achieve it."


Germa

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I use a small, cheap tripod from (some kind of) a dollar store. (but we have Euro's)
The painting is left on my easel, I set my camera, on that tripod, in the same angle as my painting is, using the grid on my camera, I don't have to wait for a cloudy day since we have lots of them and take my photo without flash or anything.

I use Windows Live Photo Gallery to straiten and crop too.

I've got a tip from a friend, to use the camera's timer, than you'll be sure your trigger finger doesn't move the camera at all while making the photo and I'm going to try it, next time I have to take a photo of my paintings.


Tony (ASM)

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  • I'm Tony from Halifax, UK
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I use my iPhone to record a video! If you hold the camera still while recording you'll be able to grab an image from the video playback (pause the playback, touch the screen to remove the time bar then, hold down Home button and power button together for a few seconds or until you hear a click -assuming 'ya volume is up) then, check your photos to find it there!  :smart:


Alternatively, I use a digital camera on Macro setting with my indoor 'daylight bulb' on. Sometimes I need to use a tripod and the self timer.
''Don't spend life going forward in reverse, just glimpse the rear view mirror now and again then, focus on what lays ahead''.
(Tony. ASM 3rd July 2013)


mea hamo pena

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Germa,

Thanks for the tip on using the camera's timer function to snap a photo of a painting.  Will try it today.

mahalo and aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


Daisyblue77

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Thanks Lillian for bringing up this subject.  I have often wondered about this as well.  I really like your idea and will try this.  I always get "hot spots" or shadows that aren't really in the painting in my photo shot. 

I like your suggestion Germa regarding using the camera timer.  You guys are so smart.

Happy  :painting:
Deborah     :wave:

†  This little LIGHT of mine .... I'm gonna let it shine  ♫ ♪


Lillian

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 :urwelcome: Didwaud.


You lost me, Tony!   :2funny:   You're such a pro at using your toys! 


Germa, I got my camera manual out for the thousanth time, this time to see if I could find how to use the timer.   :confused:   I never can get the hang of what they say in those things. 
I will keep your advice in mind. :thankyou:

I signed up for a camera course at the college this summer but found out it coincided with the bus trip to the National Art Gallery in Ottawa so I had to put it off to a later date.  :'( I must set my priorities!  :)
« Last Edit: June 27, 2013, 06:45:35 PM by Lillian »
"The way to be happy," said Winston Churchill, "is to find something that requires the kind of perfection that's impossible to achieve and spend the rest of your life trying to achieve it."


Pebble

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I tend to scan my paintings into the computer rather than photograph them, which means no light flashes or reflections, no cropping needed either.  At the moment being fairly new to painting I only paint smallish pictures the problem would be if your painting is larger than about A4 so it doesn't fit in the scanner.  ::) :-\
Penny XX


mea hamo pena

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Duh, scanning the small paintings.  Why didn't I think of that.  Probably because I'm too excited about how they turned out to let the paint dry thoroughly.

Good suggestion, though, Pebble.  Thanks.

aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


mea hamo pena

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Thank you for the sweet compliments.

I'm always up at 5AM!!  Can't let the day pass me by.

Glad the water colors were useful to you.

My friends all think your heart watercolor card is exquisite.  I'm going to frame it in my "studio" to inspire me to rise to your level.

Yes, would be fun to hear of other "meet ups" of PB members.

aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


mea hamo pena

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Pebble,

I took your suggestion and scanned one of my very first practice pieces.  It's roughly 6" x 8."  The scan does come out distorted like the photograph does.

Please remember that this was done months before I found paintbasket.com.  It would not look like this with what I know now.  Just wanted to show how the scanned version looked.


aloha

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


mea hamo pena

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Oooops,  In reference to what I just posted:

I should have said, "The scanned picture does NOT come out distorted like the photographed version."

Sorry,

mea
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


Germa

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It's a good idea, but the smallest canvas boards I use are 24 x 30 cm, bigger than A4
And when you use canvas, you know, the once that are at least 1 cm thick, a scanner isn't very useful.

About the flash thing: I am told to shut the flash down always, before you make a photo of a painting.


Pebble

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Mea - you painting looks fab, I love the colours, and this was done before Paintbasket.

Od course I forgot that acrylics and oils are done on canvas not paper   :idiot2:  so they wouldn't be so suitable for scanning.  ::)
Penny XX


vic '

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So far all I have done is use my smartphone camera in daylight, I can just upload to the web from my camera.
But I can see why you might want as perfect a picture as you can get.
If it's a big painting you could use a tripod and photograph at distance using the zoom.


stoney

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:urwelcome: Didwaud.


You lost me, Tony!   :2funny:   You're such a pro at using your toys! 


Germa, I got my camera manual out for the thousanth time, this time to see if I could find how to use the timer.   :confused:   I never can get the hang of what they say in those things. 
I will keep your advice in mind. :thankyou:

[]


What make and model of camera?


 

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