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Author Topic: Drawing Set Up  (Read 1985 times)

patindaytona

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on: June 26, 2013, 01:59:42 PM
What set up is everyone using here? In short, I'm using a board to attach my drawing too, and have NO table (cluttered room), so I'm leaning it on the floor! most of the time against a turpentine can :whistle:
I'm sitting in my chair leaning over to draw this way. I see my drawing at least from a fair distance this way continuously.

If i had (or get) a table of some sort, I'd be too close to my drawing and out of habit, would not bother to get up often enough to see it from a good distance.
I have an easel, but it's somehow too uncomfortable drawing without resting my elbow in that postion and besides...it's too vertical and awkward to draw fluid strokes.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


mea hamo pena

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Reply #1 on: June 26, 2013, 02:21:02 PM
Pat,

Whatever works, works. 

I like to stand when I paint.  Have a small table, and an inexpensive table top easel from Ben Franklin. Set my laptop up on the bookshelf next to me to display the picture I'm working from.  Works for me.

aloha

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patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: June 26, 2013, 02:50:28 PM
That's probably the best answer I could expect or want...i suppose i'd rather hear that , then, Pat, no, no no, you need to get one of these, etc.
When I'm painting, I also stand, and many times like to put the painting on the floor also. Somehow it really puts it out of context for me to see it objectively well. If it was on the easel, it's kind of like a "framed" image of it and makes it still too subjective while painting it. The more it's de-personalized, the better.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


ImBatman

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Reply #3 on: June 26, 2013, 03:17:30 PM
Pat,

I made my own from a $3 piece of MDF about 15mm thick. It has a slope of about 9.5 degrees and it is sealed with poly sealer. It allows me to use it for drawing and Watercolours as well.

For me it is a nice slope for both. Sturdy enough for stretching Watercolour paper on without warping. It isn't overly portable though.

I guess it is all personal preference. I think the drawing surfas is about 600mm wide and about 450mm high from memory.

Batman.
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patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: June 26, 2013, 04:03:47 PM
Batman..do you mean an easel?( i have one already) or the board to use?
I have a thick board which i usually rest on my lap for careful work, then put on the floor to get a overall view of things when I'm not sure about what i see and work back and forth in that way.
I know it's not comfortable at all that way, but this is serious to me and if that helps me to SEE things better, i'll do it that way.  I believe in hard work for anything worth while.   Not that i want to make it hard for myself. I'm going to think about this for a few days and see if i can come up with something else though.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


ImBatman

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Reply #5 on: June 26, 2013, 07:48:04 PM
No Pat

It's a desktop sloping drawing board. Like Dennis uses when he does his watercolours tutorials. The near edge is flat on the table and the far edge is about 10cm off the table. the image seems to have gone missing, so i will repost when I get home.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


Zach

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Reply #6 on: June 27, 2013, 03:54:57 PM
Alot of times I use one of those drawing boards that you set on your table you can pull out the legs and have it at an angle. Most of the time I lay it flat on my dresser and I sit on a stool.  I like to look down on my drawing, I dont much care for drawing with your paper at angle makes your arms tired from having to hold um up and its just plain ole uncomftorble. 
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patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: June 28, 2013, 12:18:25 PM
I used to have a drafting class wayyyyyyyyyyy back in High School and they had huge angled desktops, which would be ideal.
But, i too, feel at home more comfortable holding my drawing in my hand (attached to the board), because i can move it around freely to see it from a distance, or to focus up close real quickly.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Ray3

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Reply #8 on: June 28, 2013, 11:01:15 PM
It's been said its a matter of preference a sloping table top drawing board or an easel
but if you go out into the field to draw what do you use then?
Would it just be your drawing book?   :help:
Kindest regards
Ray

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patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: June 29, 2013, 04:36:04 AM
I suppose looking at all this in a different way would tell me that it's good that their is no "right" way (that goes for painting too).   If all this was narrowed down, like how one learns to play piano over years and  years of strict scales etc, then it would be difficult to accept these things. But to know you can do it in so many different ways means everyone has a chance to be unique and different and more hope to believe in one's self.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #10 on: June 29, 2013, 05:29:04 AM
I have to say I don't really have a specific preference. All depends on where I am, and what I am drawing.
If I am out and about I have two smaller sketchbooks I carry, also never go without the camera. That way if I get into a more detailed drawing and I have to leave, I will have the photo for reference as well.
If I am doing a portrait, I prefer to have my larger tablet flat and be able to rest my arm, so that usually means on a table or board of some kind.
Mostly, I just draw with what's at hand wherever I happen to be at the time. Talk about tossing in a spanner!  :2funny:
Cheers, Val

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Zach

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Reply #11 on: June 30, 2013, 01:56:10 PM
I have one of those drafting tables.  I dont use it very much as its kinda bulky for my room and theres definately  no room dow stairs.
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patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: July 01, 2013, 07:00:07 AM
Val, yes, i should probably at least TRY and go downstairs (not the best light though) and put it on the table. See what happens..habits are hard to change.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


bamagal

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Reply #13 on: July 12, 2013, 06:13:39 AM
I have been debating whether or not to get a drafting table, but I dont want anything big and bulky rather something I could fold up and carry with me. I have a french easel for painting but dont use it to draw with. My favorite drawing spot, so far, is with the drawing board resting at a angle on a pillow in my lap sitting in my favorite chair. I can turn it easily to work on any spot. I have a little folding tv table next to me holding all my pencils and such. I guess the best way is what ever works best for you :)
Glenda

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scouserl41

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Reply #14 on: July 12, 2013, 06:42:30 AM
I guess I'm spoiled I have all of those!   :blush:
I'm not a millionaire but by shopping carefully on Craigslist I managed to get a studio easel for $30 then a french easel for $40 complete with paint!
Then while cruising the free section I found a folding drafting table with a bad top for free. I replaced the top with some scrap plywood I had in the garage and painted it.
Now I have the best of all worlds. I work out on the patio (it's great to live in California!) and I paint generally with the studio easel in front of me, the french easel acts as a table for paints and my pallet. When I start a new painting I drag out the drafting table and set all the reference pictures, tracing paper, board/canvas, pencils etc.
When I go to my local art class or out to do Plein Air I take the french easel with paints, board and brushes in it and a backpack with sketching material.
The thing I like about my setup is that the painting on the easel is visible from my armchair in the living room so I can take multiple distant looks at it without having to get up. I find that really helps get the proportions/perspective right.
Brian
« Last Edit: July 12, 2013, 11:58:38 AM by scouserl41 »
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