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Author Topic: Keeping a clean palette  (Read 2644 times)

voodoolady

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on: May 26, 2013, 07:00:52 PM
We live on tank water (ie...we rely on rain only to give us drinking water and we aren't connected to a main supply)

Cleaning things like palettes after a days painting can use a lot of water I don't have...I paint exclusively with Acrylics and also have issues with paint drying too quickly so here is what I do

Take a sheet of greaseproof paper which is double the length of your palette and fold it in half. (with excess enough to tape in down on the back.

As the greaseproof paper is white it will show your mixed colours clearly and if you wish to retain the mixes for the next day just untape and have a plastic container about the size of your pallette.   Unfold the paper and place it paintside up on the damp cloth.....give the paint a squirt of fine mist water.....cover lightly with top sheet of paper and put the lid on.  This will keep your paint workable for days.

Also clean up is a breeze.....just roll up the paper and put it in the rubbish bin (unless you want to create cool background abstracts with scrunched up paper  ;D)

Jackie

Whoever said "It's as slow as watching paint dry" was obviously not an acrylics painter


Lillian

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Reply #1 on: May 27, 2013, 03:36:04 AM
Sounds like a good workable method, Voodoolady.   :thankyou:
I think we all should be mindful of how much water we use.  It's a very valuable commodity.
Our city treats our water.  We pay for it and as with anything today, the price keeps going up.  :(
"The way to be happy," said Winston Churchill, "is to find something that requires the kind of perfection that's impossible to achieve and spend the rest of your life trying to achieve it."


musika

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Reply #2 on: May 27, 2013, 03:47:13 AM
I treated my water once. I took it out for a slap up meal!
Ray


Val

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Reply #3 on: May 27, 2013, 06:30:34 AM
 :2funny: Ray!

voodoo, I understand your water constraints. Living as I do, when underway or at anchor we run our watermaker, while staying in Rio Dulce we get our water from a well which is UV treated only. No chemicals. I am extremely frugal with our water supply.....except when it comes to painting. I start with fresh water every time I start a painting. Couldn't tell what's in the pot by the end...but it works just fine.  ;D Most of my water usage is cleaning my brushes....that I just won't quibble over!  :knuppel2:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Germa

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Reply #4 on: May 27, 2013, 06:43:35 AM
Although we have a LOT of water over here and we just have to open the crane, I never use water to clean my palette.
I just put old fashioned soap on my palette, wipe all the paint away with kitchen paper (or toilet paper), and when all the paint is gone, I just wipe my tile, that I use as a pallete, with en damp cloth witch I don't wash but throw away in the ban.

Our dirt is collected weekly and there it will be destroyed in the best way possible.

It is forbidden to wash chemicals trough our drains, and how they do it, I don't know, but the water cleaning industry always find those people who do that anyway.

And, since I have 2 grandchildren, I want them to be able to use clean water when they have children of themselves. ;)

By the way, I just do oil paint.


jrhall036

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Reply #5 on: June 08, 2013, 05:06:06 AM
With all this talk about various water sources, I am wondering how they affect the color, dryness (fast or slow), texture, staying power, etc., of watercolor paints, or even brushes.

Val (or anyone else who cares to answer), since you travel the world and use so many different water sources, have you noticed any difference in your paints?  I'm especially interested in the use of salt water from the ocean. Does the salt water have a positive or negative influence on your paints or brushes?
« Last Edit: June 08, 2013, 05:09:15 AM by jrhall036 »
Cheers,
Jani


polliwag

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Reply #6 on: June 08, 2013, 06:01:29 AM
Ray,  :2funny:
Dianne

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the things you look at change."
               Wayne Dyer


voodoolady

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Reply #7 on: June 08, 2013, 06:22:24 PM
With all this talk about various water sources, I am wondering how they affect the color, dryness (fast or slow), texture, staying power, etc., of watercolor paints, or even brushes.

Val (or anyone else who cares to answer), since you travel the world and use so many different water sources, have you noticed any difference in your paints?  I'm especially interested in the use of salt water from the ocean. Does the salt water have a positive or negative influence on your paints or brushes?

I don't know about other countries but in Australia many places add Chlorine and Fluoride to the water supply....I was told by someone that just using "tap water" is not good as it can contain bacteria/chemicals etc which can affect the paint down the line....I now use boiled water or rainwater (which we have tanks for as we aren't connected to the mains water supply)

I'm not sure if it's true but I don't mind using boiled water when I am out painting.....I haven't tried using sea water but I would think given salt is sodium chloride it would have an affect to the paint (perhaps good perhaps bad)
Jackie

Whoever said "It's as slow as watching paint dry" was obviously not an acrylics painter


Germa

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Reply #8 on: June 09, 2013, 01:41:46 AM
But chemicals will not be removed while boiling the water, bacteria will, but the (eventually) chloride or fluoride stays in the water.


Val

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Reply #9 on: June 09, 2013, 04:35:41 AM
Jani, I'll do my best to answer your queries. When using our watermaker, (reverse osmosis, or RO) without getting technical, takes sea water and removes most of the salt and makes it potable. To further make it safe for human consumption, it runs through a special filtration system which removes bacteria and heavy metals, and chemicals. The result is very pure water which I have no problems with. It actually tests better than household tap water.

The UV treated water (no added chemicals) we are presently getting from the well also goes through our filtration system and is as good as our RO water. So again, no problems there.

We also supplement our supply with rainwater.

I haven't actually tried pure sea water, I'm highly protective of my Kolinsky Sables (of which Nolan would like to be one in his next life  ;D ) but thought it might be fun to see the effects it would create. When we get back out to the salt next season I'll have a go with some of my old brushes. Should be an interesting experiment.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 04:38:49 AM by Val »
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


jrhall036

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Reply #10 on: June 10, 2013, 12:38:53 PM
 :thankyou: for your responses, voodoo and Val. I'm really interested in hearing what you find out about the sea water, Val. Salt seems to have both a preserving quality, such as with meats, as well as an abrasive (jewelry cleaning) and deteriorating character (with fruits and veggies). Paints used to be made with natural dyes from plants and animal matter and clays (and I even heard that there were ground up jewels in them at one time--don't know if that's true or not), which I would think salt would affect the outcome, that is, if we still used "natural" paints. Maybe synthetic paints aren't affected?  :confused:  I don't know. As I said, it will be really interesting to hear what you find out!     
Cheers,
Jani


 

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