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Author Topic: Ultra marine blue  (Read 1107 times)

njnjgirl

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on: February 09, 2013, 07:01:26 AM
I have noticed that if I use ultramarine blue wet on wet, it sometimes leaves bits of pigment...However, I used it on dry and I get the brush stroke which I can not blend.  Obvious in my last waterfall attempt.  Is it not recommended to use it wet on dry?  Should it always be used wet in wet? Using it wet on dry leaves hard edges that just won't soften  :-\ 
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


Sarah (arch)

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Reply #1 on: February 09, 2013, 08:34:53 AM
Hmmm. I did not know that! I guess I use it wet on wet most of the time. I did wonder about the hard edges on the midsection your waterfall, but I didn't realize that you couldn't soften them. Ultra is my blue of choice. I use it all the time because I LOVE the granulation. I will try some wet on dry later today to see what happens. Might it have been the Chinese white, or did you put that on after the blue?
Sarah


Denise808

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Reply #2 on: February 09, 2013, 05:35:19 PM
Glad you asked this Mary Lou. I know exactly what you're talking about so curious to find out the answer...
"Purple alone is pretty, but place mint green alongside and the purple becomes glorious. Sometimes we need to be a green in a purple person's life." ~Carolyn Blish


RA

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Reply #3 on: February 09, 2013, 10:13:08 PM
I have noticed that if I use ultramarine blue wet on wet, it sometimes leaves bits of pigment...However, I used it on dry and I get the brush stroke which I can not blend.  Obvious in my last waterfall attempt.  Is it not recommended to use it wet on dry?  Should it always be used wet in wet? Using it wet on dry leaves hard edges that just won't soften  :-\

Hi Mary Lou,
Ultramarine Blue (and its twin French Ultramarine Blue - slightly redder shade) are one of the workhorses of every watercolour artist I have met, it is probably the most used blue in this medium.
It has some properties that are very useful: very lightfast, semi-transparent, according to www.handprint.com it "The pigment particles are soft and readily clump into agglomerates; this causes the characteristic ultramarine flocculating (clumping) texture that is especially attractive in washes and color mixtures." (probably that is what you mean by "it sometimes leaves bits of pigment") and staining which makes it difficult for one to lift it completely from the paper specially when it is dry (therefore "Using it wet on dry leaves hard edges that just won't soften").
I hope this helps.
Kind regards,

RA


njnjgirl

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Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 06:22:28 AM
Oh, yes, that does help RA, and exactly what I experience.  I love the color and use tons of it.  I know now that I have to use it wet on wet as it is really difficult to soften and especially hard to lift as I am finding out in my latest waterfall lesson.  So, another tidbit that I have learned and have to remember.  Thank you Sarah and Denise, I hope this helped you too.   Love this forum.   :thankyou:  Happy  :painting:
Mary Lou

Faith is the opposite of fear.


Sarah (arch)

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Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 06:30:32 AM
Yup! It's always a good thing to understand the properties of the paint you use most. Thanks RA.  :thankyou: I never realized it was staining. Good to know as I am a lifter! I also didn't know that the French Ultra was a little more on the red side. I prefer the French Ultra, but it would effect color mixing. Thank you. Just might help explain some of my past puzzles. Good topic Mary Lou.
Sarah


 

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