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Author Topic: Selling a Painting  (Read 3888 times)

patindaytona

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Reply #15 on: January 15, 2013, 05:12:22 PM
No, I haven't.  It was just a fleeting thing on facebook. I don't care really about selling so much. My sister is the only one who's given my money..alot..for the one i did for her of her house..pencil drawing.
I went to the local art league in town over the weekend and checked out paintings and prices there. Wow, the average price was probably in the range of 900 dollars. Some were 3000 dollars! I to be honest (and modest)..mine would probably be in the top 25 out of the 200 or so paintings that were there. So, i could price..not necessarily sell it..for around 1000 or so.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


ImBatman

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Reply #16 on: January 15, 2013, 07:24:48 PM
Pat

The buyer was still interested at $300. Selling it for $100 would be selling yourself short. I'm sure you have enough room under a spare bed or something. Especially if it gets you the extra $200 the buyer thought it was worth.

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


stoney

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Reply #17 on: February 01, 2013, 03:35:33 PM
I have not ever sold anything before. A lady on a website was interested in how much i would sell my painting for. It's of the bonsai tree in snow. (not the drawing..but the painting). It's a 16 x 20 inch. I am embarrased to say too high of a price and i dont' want to sell it too low either. Any ideas? I really am embarrased about too high a price though.

My understanding is a base price is established per square inch.  Your painting is 320 square inches.  I'd suggest a dollar per square inch as a base.


dupart

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Reply #18 on: February 26, 2013, 07:45:49 AM
Okay, so I am possibly going to be crucified for this - but here goes. I am possibly not in the same position as most of you, I am retired, my wife still works, and we are still quite comfortable financially - NOPE, NOT RICH AT ALL! I do however have to get up and running as a business within the next two years or so. My greatest regret is that I did not pursue art earlier in my life, so as a result I am pretty unknown. I retired December 2011, I got to painting and I did a lot of paintings. I attended every art market I could find (we are talking Pretoria South Africa), and I had looked at what other artists were asking for their work, I had also studied what art was being sold for in the galleries. So I came up with what I thought was a reasonable price for an unknown artist. I had thousands of people look at my work and if I had a dollar for every 'ooh' and 'aah' that I got I'd be rich by now. The feedback was excellent, I was selling something fresh, something that was not common, something that you could not just find in any gallery, and the people liked that a lot! Now, guess how many paintings I sold in 2012. ONE, yup, one small painting and I was getting to a stage where my stocks were taking up too much room and I just had to STOP painting because there was no more room for my art in my house. So I did some serious soul searching and I came up with a couple of thoughts. Firstly - I love to paint, I am at my happiest when I'm behind an easel, it sooths my soul, I relax, I can think clearly, this is my passion. I made my first decision based on this. I was not going to include the time I spent enjoying my work in any calculation to fix a price on a painting! Secondly - I asked myself what was I spending on material to create a painting? I took one of my large oil paintings (approx 1.4m X 1m) for the exercise. I was shocked! I counted up every concievable cost including my diesel to get to the art markets, and I discovered I had spent a grand total of R250:00 (about US$28:00) and my price tag was R4500:00 (about US$510). I realised that I was trying to make a profit that would make any businessman smile from ear to ear. Thirdly - I had to get rid of my stock or else I would not be able to have that enjoyment anymore. So what did I do? I brought my prices down DRASTICALLY! That same large oil painting which had been unsold in over a year suddenly went for R1000:00 (approx US$113:00) and it went IMMEDIATELY. At the very next art market I sold five other paintings. Okay, so you may say 'yes but you did not get much for them did you?' No I didn't, but now I have freed up space in my studio, now I can get back to painting. Now at my next art market people will come to look for the guy with good quality 'affordable art'. To crown it all I made more money for the six paintings that I sold than what I had spent on ALL the art material that I had bought up till now. My next sales will be pure profit. So what if I have set a precedent on my own prices. One day when I become famous for my art my prices will go up, and maybe even compete with the rest of the 'rich and famous' artists, but until then what I am doing is working for me. Now I know many of you will totally frown upon my way of doing things, but that is for you to decide.  ::)


Maryna

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Reply #19 on: February 26, 2013, 08:10:17 AM
Dupart you make me think of something now. At our one market here in Durban is some great stalls of artists, some prices are really crazy and I will not pay it. The other day we passed there and the same paintings are still there and I am sure it is due to the price, as it is really really expensive.
We really have to look at what we put in and what we can get out (money that is) never sell yourself short and do not over price :)
Pat if you want my honest opinion, I will not pay $300 for an unknown artist. BUT if it is framed - then that is another story. As frames are very expensive.
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Sarah (arch)

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Reply #20 on: February 26, 2013, 08:33:35 AM
I am not frowning one bit dupart. :) 
Sarah


Val

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Reply #21 on: February 26, 2013, 09:36:34 AM
High prices are one of the reasons why there are so many 'starving artists' out there.  :cost:   But to be fair, one must also make a fair assessment of the work itself.   :think:
Cheers, Val

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dupart

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Reply #22 on: February 26, 2013, 09:45:36 AM
Phew!!! :sweat: After I had posted all of that I thought to myself, these people are gonna chuck me out! Just one thing, you are right Maryna, if the artwork is framed the cost of the frame is included in my price. Also another thing, if I do a commission I will ask a higher price, but still a highly affordable price. You are also right about seeing the same paintings at the same stalls month after month after month. That of course is another benefit that I forgot to mention, you will hopefully have a good turnover of paintings, and people will return to you to see what's 'new'. Let me just add, and this is how I feel about it, the prices that some 'known artist' paintings go for, are ludicrous, and I look at them and I think to myself, I know some good 'unknown' artists who can do far better but they cannot sell their paintings at a competitive price. There something wrong here - don't you think?  :confused:
« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 09:47:58 AM by dupart »


nolan

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Reply #23 on: February 26, 2013, 11:27:52 AM
it is better to get a foot in the door and sell some paintings than have them all sit on the wall in a gallery. So Dup, you did the right thing there.

The important thing is also that you did not drop your prices so low that you were only making your money back, like I see so often done by amateur artists. You still make a decent R750 for your time.

Now as you sell more paintings and become better known, you will gradually increase your prices and before you know it, you will be getting R4500 per painting and the guys will gladly pay it because it's a Dupart painting O0


dupart

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Reply #24 on: February 27, 2013, 03:23:31 AM
exactly my train of thought Nolan. It works for me.


patindaytona

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Reply #25 on: February 27, 2013, 04:44:41 AM
Dupart, since you sold right away after lowering the price, it must have been quite a surprise to suddenly after all that time...sell!
Behind the price, alot of it has to do with attitude. I myself as everybody knows here have alot of difficult frustration involved. I know..everyone does, but this is all personal and it's a matter of personal judgement to set a price according to your own personal struggle with "what you put into it". For you...it's relaxing. For me...It is a thrill to accomplish a painting, but I set high expectations on myself and it's nerve wracking for me.
I have not sold a single painting of mine........so far. I haven't tried. I did give a few to my sister and mother (who paid me alot, which i didn't expect them to do, but they did).
So........for me, I'd have to put a very high "price" on mine.  That's why I don't even try to sell. The only place I know of here in town is an art league, which has a showing about every 3 months open to all area artists. I haven't even tried showing mine to anyone (after more than 3 years of painting!)
But.........their is a show next month. i bought a beautiful frame already. I'll probably enter. (they have quite a few cash prizes, but only the top 3 or so are a fairly large amount).
You can put prices on your work if you want. What I'm getting at is that the environment also matters. This is a pretty nice little gallery with lights in the ceilings (except the "other" room where they put "overflow" AND hope mine doesn't end up in that room!! Flourescent lighting :whistle:     So....because it's a decent respective place, i'd think the price could go higher. About an average price there from what I've gathered last time i visited was around the $1000 (usa price). Some where 2,500! and were not "great" paintings at all. I don't know if anyone at all sells there with such high prices or not.
What is your environment there Dupart? Can you describe it? Their are alot of outdoor festivals in my area and I've NEVER put my work in them...to me, that just lowers the quality..putting them under tents etc.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #26 on: February 27, 2013, 11:34:27 AM
Their are alot of outdoor festivals in my area and I've NEVER put my work in them...to me, that just lowers the quality..putting them under tents etc.

I agree there Pat, prices are higher in a gallery, but the commission the gallery takes is also generally higher, so it often balances out. Sometimes you can actually make more money at the festivals - as long as it is an art fair and not a general flea market type of fair. Flea market fairs is not the place to sell paintings, people go there to browse, buy cheap trinkets for the kids and maybe something to eat


patindaytona

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Reply #27 on: February 28, 2013, 04:13:38 AM
Oh yeah Nolan..we have a huuuuugeee (as they say on the commercials)...flea market here in Daytona. My wife suggested that for me. A sick joke to me.    I wouldn't ever put mine in a art fair even. Because it's just too carnival like for me. People pretty much go there for same reason..eat cotton candy and buy art?? Not for me.
Some people, like myself, just take their art too personally (a good thing for some and bad for others), and each one I do is just too personal to be displaying under a tent with people going by eating fries and slushies.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dupart

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Reply #28 on: February 28, 2013, 06:52:40 AM
I take my art to two different markets. One is a dedicated art market while the other is an 'Art and Antique' market. The latter does have stalls selling food and refreshments, but I do not mind so much. In fact, three of my paintings I sold to an impulse buyer who was visiting the market without even planning to buy art. Galleries - well, my history with galleries is rather disappointing. Last year January, just after I retired from my career, I made what I believed to be comprehensive and professional CVs on CDs which I then handed to select galleries in my area. In each case I met with the gallery owners so that they knew who I was. I also pointed out to them that if they wanted to see any of my work I would gladly bring them samples to look at. Each person I dealt with assured me that they would look at my CD and call me, and then they saw me off with a smile. Two weeks later I started calling on the same galleries and without exception every one had some excuse for not contacting me. Two weeks later I had a repeat of this experience. Out of all the galleries that I had visited only ONE had the decency to call me and tell me that they could unfortunately not take my work! Three of the galleries LOST my CD! One gallery closed down! One swears high and low that I never even gave them a CD! Another one's owner remembers me but can't remember where he put the CD! One gallery was very excited and wanted my work at the annual show. The owner told me to get my work ready and that she would call me soon. After many messages on her mobile and emails to her the annual show came and went. I finally did get through to her and her excuse was that there had been no place for my work at the show. If this is how galleries conduct business I will stick to markets.


nolan

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Reply #29 on: February 28, 2013, 12:00:21 PM
it's very sad that this is the treatment you have got from the galleries Dup  :-X If you have more CD's left, try other galleries  ;D as they say : persistence pays  O0


 

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