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Author Topic: Fields, Water, Snow  (Read 760 times)

patindaytona

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on: February 09, 2011, 01:59:01 PM
Seems that whenever I do something like a field, or water. Anything that consists of many elements that are supposed to all look suggestive...snow too!    I get so involved with it that i can never get it to where it looks right or correct to me. It it were a tree, a rock or something, I can tell myself it is done. i guess it's part of the peripheral vision or what you call winking at the painting.    Somehow with these kind of subjects it's hard to make them look "whole" in the same way that a tree, rock should. Do you understand what I mean? The drifts in snow, the very suggestive foliage or corn...whatever in fields. It's a matter of balance and I can't stop or get to where it looks in balance somehow. As professional artists...have you come across this same problem or are aware of it?
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #1 on: February 09, 2011, 02:21:37 PM
We are all too aware of it and that is part of the daily challenge all professional and amateur artists are faced with.
 
To explain in just words is a very difficult task, because no matter what I say, or put onto words, will always be interpreted differently by each individual ::)  Why? Because so many factors come into play - preconceived ideas, previous practical experiences, emotional experiences, and many others.

Short of an actual demo (not always practical from our side as we have our business side to attend to) words will always be subjective. Time is not always on our side no matter how much we would like to.

All said and done, most of the paintings are suggestive because we are nearly  always doing expressionistic work - giving the impression of an object (unless you are wanting to spend the time and energy to paint absolutely photographically wise)
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: February 09, 2011, 03:39:01 PM
I was looking for a hard factual answer Dennis...I'm joking. I understand. When I paint I visualize alot. I start seeing where things would be...i'm sure this is the "way" to paint. Seeing. The more a painting progresses, the more you see. That's really about the bottom line to it isn't it. But it's not easy to DO it! I definitely saps your enthusiasm. On that note, I think it's good to be aware of that and regulate how often/much you paint. Everyone's different. I take my painting very seriously, as you all do I'm sure, so I will have to rejuvenate myself with a break. Some people paint every day all day! I'm not one of those and I don't really want to be. But I'd love to have a collection of nice work eventually. Their's really no hurry.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2011, 04:05:20 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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