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Author Topic: Anything Oil Painting  (Read 23547 times)

dennis

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Reply #15 on: February 27, 2011, 09:07:00 PM
An interesting piece of information I googled from a manufacturer.

Quote
Also, contrary to what some believe, applying a drying medium over a wet oil painting will not cause the paint film to dry faster; rather it seals in the paint, preventing proper oxidation, which can lead to cracking.
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nolan

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Reply #16 on: March 09, 2011, 11:19:03 AM
Kelley, it would be more difficult doing a portrait from a mirror.

Deb - I only varnish acrylic paintings


nolan

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Reply #17 on: July 29, 2011, 04:15:49 PM
You can frame a wet painting I have done it many times, you just have to be VERY careful to not smudge the painting when putting it into the frame  ;)

I suppose you could varnish a painting while it is in the frame by carefully masking the frame with masking tape, but that would be kinda lazy, it's too easy to quickly remove the painting from the frame  ::)


liz

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Reply #18 on: July 29, 2011, 06:04:04 PM
Hi Deb,
Could it be that you're thinking of a light varnish that can be used when your painting surface is dry? It is not a heavy permanent coat of varnish, but maybe 'Retouching varnish,' which is applied to even out shine and protect oil pigment until such time that you can apply varnish, whenever that may be.


dennis

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Reply #19 on: July 30, 2011, 11:02:21 AM
I regularly varnish paintings when in the frame. I have developed a technique with the brush that does not damage the frame at all. I would recommend that if you are not experienced enough -  take the painting out of the frame first.

Don't use retouching varnish to do the final varnish on the painting. Retouching varnish is a special solution to actually react with the dry surface in order to form a bond with the new layer of paint. Oil paint gets hard and develops a very shiny surface as it ages and if you have to do work on an old painting without preparing the surface to be painted then there is the possibility that the paint will also peel of at some stage - like painting on glass.

If you use retouching varnish as a final varnish then you stand the chance that you can damage the painting. PLEASE remember that retouching an old painting is a specialized job.

You can see one of my restoration jobs here: http://www.paintbasket.co.za/restoration.htm
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #20 on: August 02, 2011, 04:17:47 AM
Very wise.... listen to the headmaster  :smart:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


liz

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Reply #21 on: August 02, 2011, 05:56:09 PM
Thanks, Dennis, for clarifying the use of retouching varnish which is used while yet working on a painting, but not for use as a final or permanent varnish.

Most of my paintings have never been varnished and the colors are still brilliant as some of you have seen.  When looking at them closely, however, a coat of varnish would 'brighten' them up.  Should I use spray or liquid varnish?


dennis

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Reply #22 on: August 03, 2011, 02:58:28 AM
I think that is a matter of personal choice. I have never used the spray so I can't really comment on it. I use the liquid varnish - our own mix.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Kelley

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Reply #23 on: August 13, 2011, 10:48:36 AM
Wow, it sure does feel great to be back!  I feel as if I need to start over from fundamentals.  I have some ideas for painting subjects, but some require preparing the canvas to a very smooth surface.  This is something I've never achieved.  I am wondering how many layers of gesso this would require 5, 7, 10?  What do I use to sand between layers?
Kelley


Val

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Reply #24 on: August 13, 2011, 11:56:32 AM
Sandpaper?  :D Welcome back Kelley, nice to have you aboard.  :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Kelley

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Reply #25 on: August 13, 2011, 12:04:28 PM
Thanks Val!  I'll check our local art supply to see if they have such sandpaper.
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #26 on: August 13, 2011, 03:32:23 PM
use #1000 sandpaper. Just be careful to not sand into the weave


Kelley

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Reply #27 on: August 13, 2011, 03:34:27 PM
Perfect! Thank you Nolan! O0
Kelley


Anya

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Reply #28 on: September 24, 2011, 12:39:16 PM
What is the best way to patch up a tear in a canvas?

I was just cutting out the clear cover from the rose and sliced through the canvas. I just applied gesso to the back but not sure that will work.



nolan

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Reply #29 on: September 24, 2011, 01:40:21 PM
oops, so you didn't lay the canvas flat on the table and pack books underneath like I showed in the tulip tutorial :knuppel2:

You would normally glue a canvas patch at the back and then touch up the front with gesso.



 

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