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Author Topic: Anything Oil Painting  (Read 23587 times)

nolan

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on: January 31, 2010, 10:04:37 PM
In this part of the forum you can chat about or ask questions about anything to do with oil painting.

If you have done or are busy with an oil painting and want our comments on it, then please post it in the Encourager Section


patindaytona

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Reply #1 on: December 27, 2010, 08:39:12 AM
I thought I had it all down. I studied the color wheel, everything. Today, almost emmediately as soon as things started going wrong I get so impulsive. I had some greens mixed for distant shrubbery,etc.
To make it short, I started grabbing anything on my pallete. It's a landscape. I am pretty good with tones and can judge them well on the painting, but that's mostly what i'm looking at. In other words, the colors are not accurate (not the same greens in the photo, but at least they ARE green). You've seen painters who work real fast and just dip into all kinds of paints. I'm a little that way, because I see things "IN"the painting (invision) and that makes me impulsive. I begin using my finger, using a dry towel to "wipe out"..because i'm invisioning things from what I've already got layed down. It turned out fairly well eventually, but not done with it yet. It's just that when i had something good and it messes up, i panic and have no idea what to do! I wipe out what i think is wrong, and then it's a big smear, then i really panic and start dipping any paint pile that's there, some greyish blue, some pure green, some pure burnt sienna and start mixing on the canvas. I guess their's no real answer here. Anxiety causes impulsiveness. It's not a good thing.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: December 27, 2010, 09:37:22 AM
The sky went ok, but the foreground no. I'm just hoping it was a difficult subject to begin with. Their's little contrast. It's not like "a tree goes here, a rock goes there". All it has is subtle variation. So I quickly got carried away and added thick paint with a knife, and made it all much more contrasty. I ended up sloppily mixing my shadow color with some green here and burnt sienna there, quite carelessly. But the thing is......all those colors are kind of compatible with each other. Was I making mud, or was i actually doing something that was not wrong? No matter what the ratios were, would it end up right because the core color would always be something that belongs in a landscape? Hoping it was just this painting alone that was a difficult one.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #3 on: December 27, 2010, 10:10:09 AM
 ;D sometimes the odd mixes do work, but you will always get better results if you mix your colours according to a system. That way you have a lot more control over the resultant colour.

Having said that, it isn't always necessary to mix the colours exact, you often want to enhance / change the colours to get certain effects or change the lighting in the scene


patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: December 27, 2010, 11:27:05 AM
Usually when I tell myself it's done (painting every nuance I can possibly see!), i let it dry, then get it out a couple days later and then start to modify. Using glazes. That usually seems to be the way i do all my paintings. Toning down colors, enhancing, cleaning up edges,etc.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: December 27, 2010, 11:47:39 AM
Another way to look at it is that painting is an interpretation. It can border on the abstract. Off colors,etc. BUT....if it is tastefully worked out, it's ok. Still...i prefer to try and do those colors more correct.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Kelley

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Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 07:49:31 PM
I have only done one portrait in acrylic and then it was very long time ago.  I may start one in oil as I mentioned to Dennis, but I need to complete the painting of the jetty fishing.  Would it be more difficult doing a self portrait in a mirror or a painting from a picture?
Kelley


DebRamthun

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Reply #7 on: February 26, 2011, 10:09:47 AM
I have  a question concerning varnish... I am nearing completion of a painting I want to show.  I have no idea how to varnish when the painting is still fresh.  I have never varnished before liking the muted tones but this one needs to look fresh.
Any suggestions?
Thanks
I can be found on facebook under
_deb_ramthun_  (with the slashes removed)
the painting is posted there and shows the progression from start to within a few weeks of done.
Thanks again
Deb


Kelley

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Reply #8 on: February 26, 2011, 05:38:33 PM
I have yet to varnish a painting Deb.
Kelley


dennis

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Reply #9 on: February 26, 2011, 06:13:31 PM
Hi Deb
First I need to know what the medium is you paint in - oils or acrylics.
In acrylics you can varnish the painting as it is thoroughly dry - say an hour or 2 after completion if you have not been using an extender gel.

Oil paintings, even if thinly painted, need to be left for about 4 months before applying a varnish. If impasto style then can be anything from 10 - 12 months depending on the thickness applied.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #10 on: February 27, 2011, 04:04:16 AM
Dennis... is varnishing an acrylic painting a necessity or just good practice? Curious  :confused:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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DebRamthun

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Reply #11 on: February 27, 2011, 04:48:31 AM
It is an Oil painting.... I had not varnished yet just because usually when a painting was done.... well it was done and varnish was just an afterthought.  But I was in the art store (insert any art store name in your area)  and there was a varnish for use when the paint is still relatively fresh.  I don't remember the exact name of it but it could be applied early and then reworked over.  the suggested use was for when you wanted a painting varnished for a show.
I am not sure how to insert photos here so this is the facebook link to the painting.
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=174176722628266&set=a.162289600483645.31199.109053815807224&theater

If you click further you can see it in progression....
I want to really have the brush stroke in the background not dull out.
Thank you so much.  Any advice about varnish is appreciated.


dennis

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Reply #12 on: February 27, 2011, 11:06:29 AM
Quote
and there was a varnish for use when the paint is still relatively fresh.

I must admit that I have not heard of this before. As they say, "One is never too old to learn!"
Will have to research this one. Many places will not let a painting be entered for an exhibition when it is still wet - the  damage factor, insurance, etc.

Varnishing is not a necessity but it does give a additional protection layer and also enhanced the colour.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


DebRamthun

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Reply #13 on: February 27, 2011, 03:22:09 PM
The painting is within a week or two of done.  And will be hung in about two months. just wanted to keep that crisp apple color and shine. 
thanks for the thoughts and ideas.


Kelley

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Reply #14 on: February 27, 2011, 04:25:24 PM
Deb, I followed the progression of the painting and was quite impressed with how you documented everything. Wonderful work with Abe. :clap:
Kelley


 

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