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Author Topic: DIY Tracing Lightbox  (Read 3395 times)

ImBatman

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on: November 06, 2012, 09:59:36 PM
Hi everyone

Here's my latest DIY for my art projects - a DIY tracing Lightbox! No more messy rubbing the backs of drawings or standing at the window to trace.

Other than the standing lamp light in the background which I already had, the only thing I needed to buy was two $8 frames from a cheapie store.

A bit of glue and a few little piece of timber to secure the joints inside the box that I already had and a sheet of baking paper to act as a diffuser between the two sheets of glass that form the front surface that was it.

DIY tracing Lightbox!
DIY tracing Lightbox!


I found the instructions on YouTube, but basically this is how you do it:

1. Buy two frames (I just bought the cheap type with glass in them that you put things like certificates etc in) - mine were designed to hold 40x50cm or 16x20 inch photos.
2. Carefully take frames to bits.
3. Prepare box part using the backing boards. Cut one down centre - two sides. Cut the other one to size to make the other ends.
4. Join it all together to make a frame. I taped the corners then used strong glue I had and some little bits of timber to secure the joins. After glue is dry I might reinforce with a few screws.
5. Make light diffuser by sandwiching a piece of baking paper between the two pieces of glass that came with the frame.
6. Assemble the whole thing. One of the black frames becomes the base/back, the other holds the glass in place at the front.

Then it's a simple case of using it like a window for the same task, by shining a light through it.

Works like a charm.

By the way Nolan, yes that is my cherries at the stage of starting the shadows. Strategically placed of course. >:D

Search for "diy lightbox cheap frames" on YouTube if you want the demo.

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


V

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Reply #1 on: November 07, 2012, 12:16:05 AM
 :thankyou: for sharing. This is awesome!


NOELINE

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Reply #2 on: November 07, 2012, 01:06:14 AM
Thanks for sharing with us!


dennis

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Reply #3 on: November 07, 2012, 01:40:24 AM
And I see the Old Wood, Rusty Chain, etc  :2funny: :2funny: :2funny:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #4 on: November 07, 2012, 04:40:35 AM
Wish I had room to keep one.....
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


ncwren

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Reply #5 on: November 07, 2012, 05:23:26 AM
That's a nice one-well done Batman!  :clap:
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: November 07, 2012, 09:07:56 AM
Batman..heading over to youtube...sounds like a really good idea.
Just went there...but how do you use it? I'm not sure how you utulize it to trace something?
« Last Edit: November 07, 2012, 09:21:14 AM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #7 on: November 07, 2012, 10:51:34 AM
How to Make a Cheap Lightbox


ImBatman

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Reply #8 on: November 07, 2012, 02:01:06 PM
Pat,

It just replaces the "against the window" method that Dennis and Nolan always describe.

I'll describe my method for a watercolour:

1. I draw my pencil border on the watercolour paper
2. Put some tape on the drawing on the reverse side of the original and then position within the border (using the light box works a treat to get it right)
3. Tape the watercolour paper to the lightbox
4. Trace away.

The usefulness of the lightbox tracer is that:

1. As long as you can turn on the light/provide a strong enough torch (something like a Dolphin torch would probably go well - will give my rechargeable one a try later today because it was flat), it is available for use. It doesn't require the sun being up, or some other source being available outside the window.

2. Replaces the need for that pesky graphite scratching the back of the original line drawing.

3. You can just sit at your regular drawing/painting table with the light positioned behind it instead of having to go over to a window and do it (or in my case I was crouching down or kneeling on the floor and using my fishtank as a light box :2funny: )  No more fishies providing unwanted shadows!!!

I hope that helps out

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: November 07, 2012, 02:11:38 PM
This would be handy......that way next time i do a nude painting, my neighbors won't wonder what I'm up to when they see that 16 x 20 naked lady in the window.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


jennylynn

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Reply #10 on: November 08, 2012, 02:19:17 AM
lol !!!!     
jennylynn


ImBatman

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Reply #11 on: November 10, 2012, 12:27:28 AM
Did a trial run with the rechargable Dolphin Torch and it would be quite usable if the power were out or the likes!!!!

Batman.
I will have the chance to achieve perfection, when and only when I can remember the future.


patindaytona

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Reply #12 on: November 10, 2012, 05:36:04 AM
Did a trial run with the Dolphin Torch and now my house is totally paid for ;D ;D
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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