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Author Topic: grid  (Read 1593 times)

bubebar

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on: August 22, 2012, 08:44:50 PM
is there anyone that is able to tell me how to enlarge a reference using a gride

i know the concept but how do i do the math

if i had a 5x7 reference or a 4x6 and wanted to enlarge in a canvas 16 x 20  how do i know how large or small to make the squares and how many ;) >:( :thankyou: :help:


Maryna

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Reply #1 on: August 22, 2012, 09:08:39 PM
Hi,

What I normally do, .  I will print out my picture or drawing so I can make the blocks on it. You can do it on the computer too.I measure the exact picture. Then I work out, as an example, say my picture is 15cm x 20 cm. I will draw lines that is exactly 1 cm apart, in the length and width. Then I look at the size of the canvas. I will get the exact same about of blocks on the canvas. I do not draw blocks on the canvas, I tile pages to make it the same size. So my blocks might be say 2 1/2 cm each on the canvas sheets. So this means that the picture blocks would be 1 cm = 2.5 cm on the canvas. You number your blocks at the top and side of each row. So now I know in block 1D of my picture I needed to draw a curved line so I will do the same on my tiled canvas sheet. Once done I will transfer the entire tiled canvas sheet to the canvas. Doing this by rubbing the back of the picture with watercolour pencil and then transferring it to the canvas.

Make this sense?
« Last Edit: August 22, 2012, 09:10:29 PM by Maryna »
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


nolan

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Reply #2 on: August 22, 2012, 09:19:11 PM
Hi Barbara

If you have a 5"x7" reference picture and use a half inch grid and want to enlarge to 16"x20" canvas :

Place the grid onto the reference picture. You will then have a picture divided up into 10 squares left to right and 14 squares top to bottom.

You now need to divide your canvas up into 10 squares left to right and 14 squares top to bottom.

Let's start with the left to right 10 squares.

Place your ruler or the canvas left to right

count 10 squares, one square every half inch (the size of your grid on the reference picture) You will see that by the time you get to 10 you are not all the way across the canvas yet. This tells you your canvas is bigger than the reference so we need to enlarge the size of the squares - I know it sounds obvious, but bear with me.

Now we will double the size of the squares - one inch squares.

Start counting along the ruler again, but this time count is one inch intervals. When you get to 10 (the amount of squares you need), take a look if you are inside the canvas, on the edge or off the canvas.

If you are still inside the canvas, then your blocks need to be even bigger, so make your blocks 3 times as large (one and a half inches) and start counting again. Continue enlarging your squares until when you count the amount of squares you need and you are either on the edge of the canvas or OFF the edge of the canvas.

If you are on the edge of the canvas you are in luck. Simply mark off your squares in the same interval, eg. if you were counting every one inch, then mark off every one inch. If you were counting every one and a half inch, then mark off every one and a half inch.

If however you are OFF the canvas, then hold the zero end of the ruler against the side of the canvas to form a pivot point. Then rotate the ruler around this pivot point until your 10 square mark touches the opposite end of the canvas. Lets say you were measuring your 10 blocks every one inch, then rotate the ruler until the 10 inch measurement touches the opposite end of the canvas.

You have now basically "squashed" your ruler to fit the canvas. You can see me doing this in the tutorial video HERE

You can now mark off your intervals (in the example every one inch).

You have now split the canvas into 10 blocks.

Extend these marks all the way down the canvas.

Use the paper transfer method I show in the tutorial video to "copy and paste" the lines top to bottom as well - No need to go through the process again as the blocks are square.

and there you have a perfectly fitting grid O0


bubebar

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Reply #3 on: August 23, 2012, 08:32:36 AM
thank you    that really sounds easy enough            at least NOW I know what its all about
THANKS AGAIN
BARBARA   :thankyou:


nolan

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Reply #4 on: August 23, 2012, 12:14:07 PM
pleasure  :)


LuvAnimalArt84

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Reply #5 on: August 23, 2014, 12:39:16 AM
If you use a grid to help you draw a picture is that still considered free hand?
Erin


Val

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Reply #6 on: August 23, 2014, 04:15:03 AM
You're not tracing a picture so I would say yes. The gridlines just help with proportion....you can even 'freehand' a rough grid when on the go. The same goes for vanishing points and perspective lines. If you aren't tracing...you're freehanding!  O0    :)
Cheers, Val

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ncwren

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Reply #7 on: August 23, 2014, 06:19:18 AM
My opinion would be that using a grid is a tool.
The marks are not as free as...freehand.
~Natalie

Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already. ~Dave Willis


nolan

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Reply #8 on: August 24, 2014, 02:23:11 PM
it is somewhere between freehand and tracing I would say.

Unless your goal is to learn freehand drawing, then use all the tools at your disposal to get the best end result as that is all that matters once the drawing is complete. Nobody cares how you got to the end result once the artwork is hanging on the wall O0


 

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