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Author Topic: Painting Principles  (Read 3623 times)

patindaytona

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on: December 23, 2010, 04:23:43 AM
I see so many video tutorials. They teach you how to paint submerged rocks for example. That's fine, and their are basic principles there. Blending, the lines using a palette knife on the surface for reflections,etc. But, take someone like Van Goh, or a million other artists. They are so far removed from doing it that way. Oh, and Gaugan too. I'd love to paint like that with the freedom of not worrying about all those "principles". I love that spontenaety and childlike simplicity. I try to keep them in mind so I won't worry about sticking to those basic taught principles of how to do it. You see a video, this is how you paint clouds. That's very nice, and it looks great, but the bigger picture is you don't HAVE to be so particular with anything in a painting. I've just discovered the painting knife and it's so useful! I'm trying to incorporate it as much as I can. It gives that spontaneous look. A brush forces one to think alot more. Of course, I'm always going to use a brush though.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #1 on: December 23, 2010, 10:51:49 AM
Pat, I see that you are on a quest for searching out what to do  :clap: That is good and commendable.

Search out as much as you can and then sort out what you want, but don't throw the rest away. Store them in your subconscious and also in the filing drawer. You never know when you may find them useful in the future.

Try all the different styles and combine them if necessary until you start finding your own true style - this develops slowly over time. Many artist don't like the painting knife but I find it very useful. It can be used on its own for a complete painting. Or it can be used in conjunction with the brush, as I do many times. For example, I either use the brush to paint clouds or I use only the painting knife, depending on the effect I want to portray.
Below is an example of the combination of brush and knife by one of my past students:



I am going to look for a large painting done exclusively with the knife by one of my students and will post it soon so you can see the different styles.

My advice - if you want to become a very good painter - is to study and practice many of the methods and styles. Also try from abstract right through to the very realistic. You have nothing to lose by it and everything to gain. Try and sort out the good advice and demos from the bad - there is a lot of junk on the net supposedly in the name "art".

That is what I have done through the years. Take a look  at one of my websites http://www.masteringpainting.com and open the About Us page. There you will see some of the different styles, methods and subjects I paint in.

Hope this will be of some encouragement to you and others on the forum.
Remember - whatever you learn can NEVER be taken away from you
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


nolan

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Reply #2 on: December 23, 2010, 11:41:07 AM
I love painting with the knife. One of my signature styles is to paint poppies with the knife and then add water drops in afterwards.



patindaytona

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Reply #3 on: December 23, 2010, 12:31:58 PM
Thanks Dennis,
My mind is flooded with so much information! I do save alot of notes, but they are turning into and dictionary. I try to condense as much as I can. But that info doesn't help at all when it comes down to actually putting that physical paint onto the canvas. That's a whole different thing. I'm not too particular with color, as long as it's fairly close and I know alot of artists color's are way "off" but it still looks great. A friend gave me an eisel just the other day, and it really helps alot. I had been propping my paintings on a pillow up till now. As far as clouds,etc. they should be subordinate. I don't want to get carried away with those things, otherwise, I'll feel I have to make everything else match that level of realism. I love that painting of the owl. The painting knife is fantastic for that crisp and sharp look, and it's perfect depending on the subject you use if for, such as that tree.
Nolan, love that painting! Almost doesn't look like a painting knife for the petals. The knife really adds something that a person could never possibly control...that spontaneous unpredictable look. And it's really not hard to get it to look good either. When a viewer sees that look he/she thinks, wow, the involvement! But, it's just that look it has to it.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #4 on: December 23, 2010, 01:26:33 PM
Looked at your website Dennis. You have a really nice collection of great work. I shouldn't have quite 35 years ago! But it was agonizing. Same thing one year ago. I hope I don't get to a painting where I'm going to quit again. So far I've been lucky. Could be the subject matter I choose, I don't know. I'm kind of realizing that when I think a painting is going real good and I want to keep reaching higher, but then I start messing things up....I have to tell myself, I'm not no genius or Leonardo. Usually in any really great painting, their is going to be some flaw(s). I have to accept those flaws and leave it as it is.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #5 on: December 23, 2010, 01:36:05 PM
I'm learning not to obsess on specific areas and 'try' and see the whole. As was pointed out to me...most people will not know its there if you don't tell them!  :heeha: What a concept!  :2funny:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: December 23, 2010, 02:12:11 PM
I have heard that too Val. It's hard to believe it, but maybe it's really true.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: December 23, 2010, 02:13:42 PM
I have done photography all my life and I was so particular with everything, especially when computers and photoshop came into being. I fussed with every concievable thing. Now, with painting, I have to do the squinting thing much much more.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Kelley

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Reply #8 on: December 23, 2010, 05:46:10 PM
The thing for me is coming up with an idea, planning how to put into action and making it happen.  Picking colours is a bit easier if I don't have to be exact, but learning the brushstrokes and picking the right brush can be tough, too.  There are a lot of variables, but focusing on what I had planned and sticking to it really helps me.  The lessons I learned here are invaluable because I am more disciplined and focused.
Kelley


dennis

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Reply #9 on: December 23, 2010, 07:57:39 PM
Here are the paintings done with painting knife by my students as promised. Left them large so that you can see the techniques in them. Hope you like them.





You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #10 on: December 24, 2010, 06:03:57 AM
They all look so good. I love that look it creates. I'm overwhelmed by looking at them. Seems impossible to paint that good.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #11 on: December 24, 2010, 12:36:06 PM
Nothing is impossible if you just believe and put your  :painting: mind to it.  O0
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

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Reply #12 on: December 30, 2010, 02:29:40 AM
As always your students excel. I am always intrigued by reflections and how they make the water look wet, I find the first painting pulls me in with the colour and motion of the sea. The second painting's water is almost like a sheet of glass, where the third has an effect almost like a thin layer of ice that has cracked. Can't think of another way to describe it. Beautifully done.  :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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craftyonecent

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Reply #13 on: August 11, 2011, 06:32:42 AM
I've never really thought about creating something using my palette knife.  I really like these.  They look like lots of fun to paint!  I just might have to give it a try! :)


Maris

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Reply #14 on: August 11, 2011, 08:51:19 AM
These palette knife paintings are fabulous.  I'm just starting with oils, but am definitely going to try out the knife.
Snowy Owl


 

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