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Author Topic: What is an Encourager Session  (Read 18236 times)

Kelley

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Reply #15 on: October 18, 2010, 03:30:16 PM
I wasn't going to change the sky at first, but I placed a seagull too close to the edge and thought about the lesson on perspective.  Instead of trying to "erase" the bird alone I just redid the sky altogether.  The boat is silhouetted, but I had a tough time with the lines (free hand).  Wish I had a better camera to cut the glare, but if I shut off the flash the colors are way off, too.  My next painting I want to include more of what I've learned in your lessons.  Thank you!
« Last Edit: October 18, 2010, 03:31:59 PM by kashbrook »
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #16 on: October 18, 2010, 07:20:21 PM
Woah, what a dramatic improvement :heeha: Well done Kashbrook :clap:

Your painting is really alive now. I really like how you have added the texture to show the movement of the water and the addition of the boat adds that personal "wish you were here" feel to the painting. Awesome!


Kelley

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Reply #17 on: October 18, 2010, 09:08:45 PM
It was work, but the desired effect was achieved. :sweat: I have you to thank for the terrific advice, encouragement and lessons.  O0 By the way, a coworker already offered to buy it.  I'm not sure if I am ready for that, but it is exciting to know others appreciate what I love to do.
Kelley


Kelley

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Reply #18 on: October 18, 2010, 09:11:45 PM
:)  Looks good!

I appreciate the compliment!  This place is really terrific!  I've learned a lot in a short amount of time. Much, much more to learn and paint!
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #19 on: October 18, 2010, 09:44:01 PM
Glad you have found some value, then we are achieving our goal :clap:


dennis

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Reply #20 on: October 19, 2010, 10:15:48 PM
Hi Kashbrook. If someone has offered to buy the painting by all means sell it to them. Not only will it make the buyer happy but you will also be encouraged by the confidence put in you by others who see your work. You can be sure that sooner or later more people will be wanting to buy from you.

Please don't underestimate yourself as an artist. I had the same problem as you many years ago and only through the constant pressure put on me by a colleague to teach him did I finally give in (I thought that I was not good enough to teach). That was the humble beginnings of our Studios as they are today.

Who knows? You may, and can be, a famous artist in the making :clap: :clap: From what I see you have the makings - Go for it :gl:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Kelley

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Reply #21 on: October 20, 2010, 06:25:19 AM
Nolan, you are truly an encourager. :angel:  I will do as you recommended.  I paint for joy of it, but also for others to enjoy so I am going to consider the costs, set a price and sell it.
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #22 on: October 20, 2010, 10:45:21 AM
Are you going to frame it first or sell unframed?


Kelley

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Reply #23 on: October 20, 2010, 07:38:52 PM
I wanted to frame it first, but I am going to see what the buyer wants.  Naturally I could see if for more if it were framed, but I would incur a cost as well.  If she wants me to have it framed there is an arts and craft store that does framing.  Do you recommend matted or glossy glass.. or not at all?
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #24 on: October 20, 2010, 07:49:48 PM
I seldom frame oil paintings behind glass, but if I do I prefer regular 3mm glass. Although you sit with a glint, I feel you lose detail when you use the mat glass, but that's just my personal preference.


Kelley

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Reply #25 on: October 20, 2010, 08:52:51 PM
I appreciate your opinion.

Since the painting is raised (textured) in certain places I think it best not to put it behind glass, but I don't know much about preserving paintings so I thought glass would do...then I thought about all the paintings that are hundreds of years old and not behind glass.  I imagine there are certain polymers or preservatives in the oils to keep it for at least 50 years.
Kelley


nolan

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Reply #26 on: October 21, 2010, 02:25:45 AM
Good quality oil paints will last for hundreds of years if treated well, ie, not excessive moisture, dryness or direct sunlight.


patindaytona

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Reply #27 on: December 23, 2010, 03:39:57 PM
Just got better lighting, an LCD lamp. I noticed that my paintings look so much better and colors pop out much more than before. The different temperatures of light can make a painting look terrible, at least mine. Then, under the right light temperature, it looks so much better.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #28 on: December 23, 2010, 05:58:39 PM
This I have to agree with. I know that just by walking around the room and getting different angles of light, the picture comes alive, much more dramatic or colourful. All dependent on the angle and strength of the light. I find it quite intriguing.
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Kelley

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Reply #29 on: December 23, 2010, 06:41:12 PM
What is an LCD lamp?  Is that which goes in a projector or something new?
Kelley


 

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