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Author Topic: 15 - Landscape 5 - Buildings  (Read 9351 times)

nolan

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Reply #15 on: October 16, 2012, 01:11:41 AM
please don't trash anything, post them here. We can't help if we can't see the mistakes  ???


Val

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Reply #16 on: October 19, 2012, 05:34:05 PM
We accept them warts and all. Nolan is quite handy at wart removal!   :whistle:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


Sonja

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Reply #17 on: October 21, 2012, 02:12:46 PM
Resurrected from the trash.  The model for the shed is an actual one in the pasture adjacent to my property and it looks askew in realty but doesn't seem to work real well in the painting and i don't like the vine.  the real shed is being slowly consumed by a vine with yellow flowers looks sort of like evening primrose.  anyway, once i started becoming unhappy with the results about half way through - my overall execution started downhill.  hard to finish if you already don't like the results


Val

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Reply #18 on: October 22, 2012, 07:23:14 AM
hard to finish if you already don't like the results

I understand that seniment Sonja, but as I have found here on PB, there is very often a way to 'fix' things and bring a painting back.
I would hold on and let Nolan have a look at this one before you bin it. Personally I rather like this, I can see a few things that can be done, but not being well versed in acrylic will leave that to Nolan.
There is one thing I find myself saying a bit here on PB   ;D  "You are better than you think don't give up on it just yet.  O0
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


nolan

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Reply #19 on: October 24, 2012, 12:58:06 PM
the main thing that is missing in this painting Sonja is the depth created by the looking in / spotlight effect on the ground, add that and you will see a huge difference O0


Sonja

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Reply #20 on: November 11, 2012, 10:57:59 AM
Another attempt at a building - some improvement I think but still a challenge for me.


C.Bodine

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Reply #21 on: November 11, 2012, 02:37:38 PM
very nice, Sonja!  :clap:  You have done a very good job on your trees! What a nice setting to paint!
Christina


polliwag

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Reply #22 on: November 11, 2012, 03:50:07 PM
Sonja... These are both nice paintings, but I do think something is wrong  with your shed... I don't know what it is , but it looks like it is not grounded correctly.. maybe shading or??   Do you understand what Nolan is talking about?  I'm sorry Nolan, I don't.  Is there a better explanation of your comment?? Even if Sonja gets it, I don't think I do, and I would like to understand it myself.  Please ;D:thankyou:
Dianne

"If you change the way you look at things,
the things you look at change."
               Wayne Dyer


Sonja

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Reply #23 on: November 12, 2012, 06:49:17 PM
Thanks Christina.  Dianne don't know about the shed - like I said the real one is also kind of "squished" to one side looking but I just don't think I got things right somehow - chalk it up to a learning experience.


nolan

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Reply #24 on: November 17, 2012, 03:09:30 PM
Dianne, the spotlight effect is when you make the foreground darker and then brighten everything up towards the focal point, as though all the lights are off in the scene and you are shining a spotlight on the focal point, if you watch the class replay you will see me doing just that O0

Sonja, I really like this painting, I think it has been very well executed. What is bothering you about it is the perspective on the right hand wall where the wall meets the ground - it remains level / horizontal where it should point upward from right to left - remember things look smaller the further away they are from you


nolan

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Reply #25 on: October 09, 2013, 12:09:27 PM
:'(
Having a hard time drawing this house. I don't understand horizon and vanishing points difference.

Explain please. I have listened to video 3 to 4 times. Still don't get it.

Suzen


nolan

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Reply #26 on: October 09, 2013, 12:29:49 PM
Hi Suzen

The horizon line is where the sky and land meet. The best way to see the horizon is when you are standing on the beach looking out to sea. The horizon will form a straight, horizontal line all the way across the scene. Often however you can't see the actual horizon as it is hidden behind buildings or mountains, etc. In those cases you will need to judge the height of the horizon. To do that I always try and imagine where it would be if there were no mountains, etc. blocking my view of the horizon line.

The vanishing points : If you have a man walking away from you, that man will appear to become smaller and smaller due to the laws of perspective. The point where the man will become so small that he disappears will be when he reaches the horizon line. That point on the horizon line is called the vanishing point.

When we have a flat surface, like the wall of a house, each of those surfaces will have their own vanishing point. In the case of the house in this class, there are two walls we can see, so each of those walls will have their own vanishing point on the horizon. The left hand wall will have a vanishing point somewhere out to the left of the house and the right hand wall will have a vanishing point somewhere out to the right of the house.

The way we find those vanishing points is to extend points on the wall that would appear flat and horizontal if we were looking at that wall directly from the front. For example, the tops of windows are flat and horizontal. The top of the wall would be flat and horizontal. As we are not looking at the wall directly from the front, but from the side, you will see that for example the top of the wall is not flat and horizontal anymore, but slanted. This is because of perspective. The front part of the wall is closer to you, so appears large, the farthest end of the wall is further away from you, so it appears smaller / shorter.

If we had to make that wall longer and longer and longer, the farthest edge of the wall would appear smaller and smaller until eventually it would appear as only a dot. Where it becomes so small, it essentially vanishes, is called the vanishing point and will be on the horizon line.

Now obviously we can't make our wall longer and longer until it reaches the horizon in order to find the vanishing point, so we need another way to find the vanishing point. We do that by extending the parts of the wall that would be flat and horizontal if we were looking at the wall directly from the front. For example the top of the wall, top of the windows, bottom of the windows, etc. We use a longer ruler to extend these lines towards the horizon. Where these lines meet, on the horizon is the vanishing point for that wall.

To do:

Judge your horizon line on your painting and mark it with a strip of masking tape all the way across the canvas. When you have done that, let me know


Suzen

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Reply #27 on: October 10, 2013, 04:45:06 AM
 :thankyou:

I am ready. I bet you are sleeping!If you are will catch you Friday afternoon. EST

Suzen
Suzen


nolan

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Reply #28 on: October 10, 2013, 11:27:46 AM
great stuff, well done. Now let start with the left hand side of the house.

Mark the vanishing point on the horizon (masking tape), close to the left hand edge of the canvas.

Then use your picture to judge in either the closest or the farthest vertical edge of the left hand wall. Draw in this vertical line with pencil. Lets say, as in the class video you have judged the farthest wall height.

You can now place your ruler on the vanishing point and the top of the wall. If you have judged in the height of the back vertical (farthest corner of the wall), then draw a line from the top of the wall out to the right hand side of the canvas.

Do the same for the bottom edge of the wall : place the one side of the ruler on the vanishing point and the other on the bottom edge of the wall. If you have judged in the height of the back vertical, then draw a line from the top of the wall out to the right hand side of the canvas.

You now have the wall in place, judge where the wall ends and draw in the final vertical line to complete the "box" formed by the wall.

Let me know when you have done that, or where you are getting stuck  O0


Suzen

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Reply #29 on: October 11, 2013, 11:46:04 AM
Nolan,

I tried to draw house but it looks slated up toward each side. Yours looks straight Do you have any suggestions?

SUZEN :thankyou:











Suzen


 

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