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Author Topic: Hello from Florida  (Read 4696 times)

nolan

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Reply #15 on: December 23, 2010, 11:28:45 AM
Pat, of course painting ANY way that works for you is acceptable. In art there are no rules - only techniques and guidelines.

What you could do with your water is put some of the mountain and tree colours aside so that by the time you are ready to do your water, you still have some fresh paint to do that section wet in wet.


patindaytona

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Reply #16 on: December 23, 2010, 12:39:05 PM
Wow, that's great advice Dennis. I had seen how some videos showed the prelimenary underpainting of a sky for example using a thin coat of pure white to help blend that blue into it, but never thought about just doing the same thing, only much later on in the process using a thin coat of a similar color over the already dried paint. (or the use of medium).
Another curious question...   You know about putting down a "core or "local" color for the underpainting. Example: A blue bowl. Then, you just add a lighter color such as white for it's highlight and tone it down for it's shadow area.
BUT......some things you can't do it that way. Example: Leaves or bushes. You CAN'T put down it's local color first. Because it has to come forwards in a 3-D space. The so called Local Color has to be the darkest darks in that case. Then, you apply lighter and lighter of that local color on top of it. Do you see what I mean? I hope this only applies to trees and such things. It's getting so complicated.
Pat
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #17 on: December 23, 2010, 12:44:41 PM
I was painting a little island of lilypads floating on the water's surface. I didn't know if I should put the cast shadow (under the water on the bottom of the pond) before I painted any of the water (would look kind of strange sitting their on a bare white canvas) or put it in at the end after the water is painted in.
If I waited, it might look like it's sitting on TOP of the water. If I painted it before the water, at least it would have some of that glaze look from the water over it to give it a feel of being submerged.
But anyway, I've already done that and put the shadow in first before the water. Later i had some difficulty because I had put the shadow in before the actually subject casting it too (lilypads on top of water), so the shadow ended up having an incorrect perspective about it to match, but not too bad. Still would be interesting to know what you think about approaching this problem.
Pat
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #18 on: December 23, 2010, 01:58:26 PM
I usually add the shadow onto the dry water at the end as a glaze


patindaytona

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Reply #19 on: December 23, 2010, 02:15:18 PM
Nolan, the shadow is actually on the bottom of the lake bed (it's only a few feet deep). Not on the surface. How can I make it look like it's underneath the water? I did eventually a little bit, but sometimes you never really know what did it.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


bottleman

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Reply #20 on: December 23, 2010, 07:14:15 PM
You have clearly been around the block a few times

Are you saying I'm old?!  ;D

Pat, I once had a teacher who said your first 1000 paintings are just experiments.  An exaggeration of course, but the message was clear; it takes time to discover what does and does not work for each painter.


dennis

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Reply #21 on: December 23, 2010, 07:45:18 PM
There are so many questions here at the moment - coming too fast to answer properly :flowers:

Some are difficult to explain just with words as each person will interpret them very differently. Give me a little while to sort the questions out and I will make a few short demo vids (hopefully next week) to explain visually.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


nolan

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Reply #22 on: December 25, 2010, 12:28:56 PM
Pat to get a shadow appear under the water you need to add a reflection over it to sink it down.


patindaytona

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Reply #23 on: December 25, 2010, 02:25:13 PM
I thought of that already O0 I'm talking about the painting knife reflection type. I added them on several places in the pond, AND right beside that shadow, but somehow it just didnt' look right. I left it out, BUT the other reflections once added, helped the shadow because one knows for sure it is water and made it more clear for the shadow being under it. I'll post it once it's dry.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #24 on: December 26, 2010, 12:12:16 PM
looking forward to seeing it O0


 

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