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Author Topic: STAY WET PALETTE  (Read 4328 times)

Leana

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on: March 21, 2012, 11:30:28 AM
As far as some research went> you take a flat plastic container with a lid (or Tupperware), put a wet piece of towel or wet flattish (say 1-2cm thick) piece of foam to cover the bottom of the container.  Then you put a piece of wax paper (size to fit/cover above).  You place your paints on this...when done painting, you give it a light spray with water and put the lid on.  The acrylics will stay wet for days +.

My question is:  (maybe a  :idiot2: question)... but when you put the greaseproof/wax paper on top of the towel/sponge/foam... which side is at the bottom ...the wax side...or is the wax side on top and  you squeeze your paints on that?

I read in another forum to throw a few bronze pennies in the bottom  ??? ...this will prevent the acrylic paint from becoming mouldy over a 'long' period... thought this was quite interesting...and more than 1 person said they do this with their stay wet palette.
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


dennis

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Reply #1 on: March 21, 2012, 12:50:11 PM
It is better to use Baking Paper than greaseproof paper because it has the slight osmotic action of keeping the bottom of the acrylic puddle damp. It also increases the dampness of the container.

It is important that you do NOT make the sponge too wet - squeeze as much of the water out as you can.

I have found that it is the earth colours that attract the mould - ochre, umbers, sienna, etc - in other words all the colours of organic nature - not the synthetic types.

PS I also put a bronze coin on the corners to keep the paper flat. Give it a slight misting to flatten out the paper before adding the paints on it.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2012, 12:53:34 PM by dennis »
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sapphirelynn

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Reply #2 on: March 21, 2012, 01:28:26 PM
one  question, here in Canada we have copper pennies, do you think it is the same or should I go to the coin store and get bronze coins (never heard of them)  But this sure sounds like a great idea
Linda


dennis

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Reply #3 on: March 21, 2012, 02:13:55 PM
Copper will also do
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sapphirelynn

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Reply #4 on: March 21, 2012, 05:08:08 PM
Thanks Dennis, will give it a go :thankyou:
Linda


ImBatman

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Reply #5 on: March 21, 2012, 07:05:40 PM
I'd like to add an extra little tip on this. I live in Brisbane Australia and it's pretty hot and humid for long stretches  :sweat:.

I've found that after you've rung the sponge out, stick it in the fridge/freezer to get cooler before wrapping in the baking paper seems to work better, keeping the paint more workable for me than just straight tap water temperature.

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dennis

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Reply #6 on: March 21, 2012, 08:38:23 PM
Very good Idea  :clap: :clap: :clap: Because it is colder it takes longer to evaporate- :smart:
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Leana

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Reply #7 on: March 21, 2012, 09:23:04 PM
Dennis   :thankyou: for the feedback... what a snazzy idea to put the coins on the corners of the paper to keep it flat    :heeha:

Imbatma - fabulous id ea... in summertime it really gets hot here in S.A... will definitely try that tip out.

Still need to know though  What side of the greaseproof/wax paper is at the top...the section you squeeze your paints on... is it the wax side?

 :thankyou: for all the contributions to this post  :clap:
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


dennis

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Reply #8 on: March 21, 2012, 09:30:00 PM
As I mentioned earlier DON'T use greaseproof paper. Rather use Baking Paper. It is  the closest to the original Stay-Wet paper. You can use any side -it works both ways. I've use it for many years very successfully.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Leana

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Reply #9 on: March 21, 2012, 09:45:14 PM
 :doh: Sorry Dennis... please excuse me... still very early here...probably need another cuppa coffee  :coffee: to wake me up properly  :2funny:  ... Ok, DON'T use greaseproof paper...use baking paper... I actually thought they were the same thing, just different names  :idiot2:  ;D
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


dennis

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Reply #10 on: March 22, 2012, 02:13:36 AM
 :2funny: :2funny: no problem. I'll tell you what the difference is.

Baking paper lets moisture flow through from one side to the other very slowly. this lets the moisture beneath the paper keep the paper damp on the top surface.

Greaseproof paper (sometimes called butcher paper) originated in the butcher shop to wrap up the fatty meat in. This prevented the greasiness from contaminiting anything on the outside of the package - in other words making it greaseproof.  O0
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


ImBatman

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Reply #11 on: March 22, 2012, 02:19:58 AM
I believe it works that way because it's impregnated with silicone, hence slowing the water and also enhancing the non-stick qualities.
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Lillian

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Reply #12 on: March 22, 2012, 02:45:47 AM
Dennis, thanks for the tip about the penny preventing mold.  I'll try it.

I'm working with acrylics right now and yes, I did find that my earthy colored mix did form mold.  Thankfully, I didn't have to discard much paint on my pallet.

There is a baking parchment paper that has no wax.  Perhaps that's what you are referring to, Dennis?

Build Your Own Stay-Wet Acrylic Paint Palette


I have a couple of small store bought Sta Wet pallets that I purchased a long time ago when I was doing tole painting.  I still have a package of the pallet papers that fit in these.  If I didn't already have these, I sure would make my own like you see in the video.

Dennis, I'm wondering, does it do any harm to put your closed pallet in the refrigerator over night or when not in use?  I know they can't be frozen.

"The way to be happy," said Winston Churchill, "is to find something that requires the kind of perfection that's impossible to achieve and spend the rest of your life trying to achieve it."


dennis

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Reply #13 on: March 22, 2012, 10:06:05 AM
Yes Lillian that's the one. It must not have any wax in it as wax is a sealer and will not let the dampness through.

There is no problem putting the Stay-wet container in the normal fridge but not in the freezer. Just let the paint come back to ambient temperature before using them again. I did this for years. Mine was a flat Tupperware (or similar)
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Leana

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Reply #14 on: March 22, 2012, 01:32:36 PM
 :heeha: Dennis...this is quite interesting, didn't know about it
Baking paper lets moisture flow through from one side to the other very slowly. this lets the moisture beneath the paper keep the paper damp on the top surface.

Greaseproof paper (sometimes called butcher paper) originated in the butcher shop to wrap up the fatty meat in. This prevented the greasiness from contaminiting anything on the outside of the package - in other words making it greaseproof.  O0

 :twothumbs: Got it... I definitely have the wrong one  :( ... so off to the shop with me to get the proper baking paper  O0
Leana

"Good art is a form of Prayer.  It's a way to say what is not sayable." ~ Frederich Busch

"Art is not just ornamental, an enhancement of life, but a path in itself, a way out of the predictable and conventional, a map to selfdiscovery." ~ Gabrielle Roth


 

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