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Author Topic: Fixative Problems  (Read 2135 times)

dennis

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on: February 02, 2010, 01:51:29 AM
I have never tried it myself yet but I have heard that some artists fix their pencil and/or pastel drawings with canned hairspray instead of the commercial ones specially made and formulated for the purpose. What is your opinion  on the hairspray, and if you have used it tell us of your experience(s)?

I over-sprayed one pencil drawing once and approx 15 years later the area turned yellow.  :'(
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« Last Edit: September 29, 2010, 12:58:56 AM by dennis »
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Linda

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Reply #1 on: October 08, 2010, 01:21:38 PM
Hi Dennis, I've just registered ;)

I was always taught to use hairspray at school when I did extra art classes?

I do lots of pencil sketching, it's my favourite, but I don't put hairspray on it? Maybe I should?? ;)





nolan

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Reply #2 on: October 08, 2010, 02:07:22 PM
must say I am not a big fan of fixative sprays or varnishes - just not prepared to take the chance that my artworks will dis-colour or my painting crack after I've sold it


Linda

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Reply #3 on: October 08, 2010, 05:59:13 PM
Don't blame you :)


dennis

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Reply #4 on: October 08, 2010, 08:09:55 PM
My advice is to buy the commercial fixative that does not need to be shaken to mix the contents. Sometimes the solids in the can start to harden and then it spurts out small pieces of solids that stick to the artwork and cannot be cleaned off.

Use sparingly I have never had any trouble with them. The trouble I had with the one show at the beginning of this post was long before the aerosol cans came on the market. One had to use a special blower that was inserted into a bottle of special varnish.

I use fixative cans that are completely liquid - period  :) Had too many problems with the cans with the marble in it.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


dennis

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Reply #5 on: August 03, 2011, 02:39:48 AM
Fixative is only normally used with pencil drawings and pastels. I never used fixative on the pencil drawing on the canvas as it is not necessary.

I don't know where the story of pencil raising from under the oils comes from but have never had this happen to me in all the years. If you paint a very thin layer over the pencil sketch it will sure shine through, as also if you used a transparent paint, such as yellow, over the pencil it will also show through. If this happens (very seldom to me) then I would paint over that area with an opaque white (Yes, some whites are transparent), let it dry and then paint over it with the transparent paint and the pencil will not show through. The few time when I used a permanent black marker for sketching I've always had trouble with the jet black showing through.

Another thing: Be careful - Too much reading can bring you into confusion. Too many artist have very differing opinions and the beginner is at a loss to know who is right and who is wrong. If you want to get ahead fast then choose yourself a mentor who you like and who you can trust and stay with him/her. Learn as much as you can about all the aspects of their methods. Don't play yo-yo or musical chairs as in the end you will be the one who suddenly has no chair to sit on - what then? It's the same if you have too many paints - it becomes confusing and you will definitely become despondent. Learn how to use the few instruments at your disposal FIRST and get to know them well.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


liz

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Reply #6 on: August 03, 2011, 03:28:58 PM
You give such good, sound advice, spoken with years of experience!  Too much reading can definitely confuse beginning artists and cause them to end up without a chair, like you said, being frantic and nervous artists!  Thanks, Dennis!


nolan

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Reply #7 on: August 03, 2011, 10:52:19 PM
 O0


 

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