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Author Topic: Boy Blowing A Bubble  (Read 206 times)

stoney

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on: January 22, 2018, 04:58:24 PM
Soap Bubbles, Jean Simeon Chardin (French, Paris 1699-1799 Paris) Oil on Canvas

Boy Blowing Bubbles  9-3/4 x 11-3/4 inches.  It's an odd size as it's a drop out from a local art framing shop.  The owner gave me some; as it's scrap to him and it keeps some stuff out of the landfill. 

This bounces through time a lot more than I recalled.  I have some notes, but they're not the detailed ones like I experimented with on 'Lady at the Well'.  However, they'll give you an idea of things from one session to another.

Hmmmm.....The notebook I started this one I can't locate.  So notes will be from 2013 on.  This illustrates you can pick up a work even years later and continue to work on it.

2011  Sept 28 source photo

2011 Sept 29 6513

2011 Oct 1 6517

2011 Oct 2 6520

2011 Oct 3 6525

2011 Oct 15 6610

2011 Oct 21 6669

2011 Oct 30 6734

2011 Oct 31 6736


stoney

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Reply #1 on: January 22, 2018, 05:04:18 PM
2011 Nov 4 6784

2011 Nov 5 6795

2011 Nov 7 6814

2011 Nov 23 6882

2011 Dec 30 7316

2012 Jan 1 7327

2013 Nov 1 2929
Worked on the hands.

2013 Nov 27 2906




stoney

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Reply #2 on: January 22, 2018, 05:34:12 PM
2017 Sept 8 8141
Jacket and all over.

2017 Oct 5 8152
Sill, left side, hands, sleeve

2017 Nov 3 0037
Jacket, sleeve, hand

2017 Nov 17 0065
FAce, neck, hand, jacket

2017 Dec 15 0082
Jacket, hands, sleeve

2018 Jan 12 0106
Hair (the back of the head needed to be larger), ear, face, jacket.  This is how I set up my easel with the source photo. 

I mixed up two different tones of green but I could see after it dried there wasn't enough contrast.  Realized I goofed after it dried.  I had intended to have the triangle of the sill exposed to add character.  In the next session I darkened the triangle and a bit more in the vertical crack as well as put in the crack to the viewer's left of the bubble boy.

2018 Jan 19 0112

Put the stirring stick in the solution (and put in the 'bend' in the glass due to differences in medium density).  Also put the straw in.  Did this first before going near the foliage as there was too much danger of getting wet paint where I didn't want it.

Followed the shadow crack as described and mixed Sap Green and Burnt Umber to put the shadows in the foliage.

Started blocking in and developing the bubble.  I'm hoping to finish and sign it during the next session.



Bill76434

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Reply #3 on: January 22, 2018, 05:35:14 PM
Great to see the progression.


Val

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Reply #4 on: January 23, 2018, 05:44:54 AM
Wonderful to see another brilliant piece through its transformation from beginning.  :clap: :clap: :clap:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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Happychappy

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Reply #5 on: January 24, 2018, 05:40:42 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Very interesting indeed.   Patricia
Patricia
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nolan

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Reply #6 on: January 25, 2018, 12:01:13 PM
coming along nicely O0


linley.plester

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Reply #7 on: January 26, 2018, 04:02:49 AM
Always interesting seeing a painting develop from go to whoa. You certainly are not intimidated by difficult subjects. and I like your idea of recycling canvases.


liz

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Reply #8 on: January 26, 2018, 07:20:06 PM
Hi Stoney, ditto to what Linley said!
Question for you:  when you started to continue the work on this oil painting that you had set aside for a while, did you have to do anything to the surface- like rub it over with linseed oil or something?  I have a very old painting that I can revive if I feel ambitious to do so, but I think the oil is pretty old and dry it seems.  It looks faded, but a good composition. Or maybe toss it and do another similar painting.  It’s a popular scenic spot with a lighthouse. Waiting for your advice. . . ~Liz


stoney

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Reply #9 on: January 28, 2018, 07:09:15 PM
Wonderful to see another brilliant piece through its transformation from beginning.  :clap: :clap: :clap:

Sorry I didn't think to take good notes along with it.  At least I had the photos which give an idea.


stoney

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Reply #10 on: January 28, 2018, 07:16:30 PM
coming along nicely O0

Thank you, Nolan.  It's almost done.  I was astonished at when I first started this work.


TeresaM

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Reply #11 on: January 28, 2018, 07:19:37 PM
this looks like its going to be another good painting.  :clap:
I like seeing your progress postings of your paintings.
TeresaM
"It always seems impossible until it's done" Nelson Mandela


stoney

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Reply #12 on: January 28, 2018, 07:44:28 PM
Always interesting seeing a painting develop from go to whoa. You certainly are not intimidated by difficult subjects. and I like your idea of recycling canvases.

Blast.  Lost a lengthy reply.  Ah, well.

I don't have the knowledge base to realize how difficult something's going to be.
It's still a running joke in art class.  I've no formal training or grounding.  It's all been picked up via the projects that have interested me.

I picked up a brush in 2006.  Fantail was 2008 and the Mona Lisa 2010.

If memory serves; I figured the Mona Lisa to be a 'sub-orbital flight' when the foundation for a 'launch pad' much less gantry, engines, or capsule had even been scribbled on a napkin.  I've been known to describe it as a combination between Apollo 13 and Apollo 11.  It just occurred to me that Apollo 1 might be more accurate.  :D


stoney

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Reply #13 on: January 28, 2018, 07:59:02 PM
Hi Stoney, ditto to what Linley said!
Question for you:  when you started to continue the work on this oil painting that you had set aside for a while, did you have to do anything to the surface- like rub it over with linseed oil or something?  I have a very old painting that I can revive if I feel ambitious to do so, but I think the oil is pretty old and dry it seems.  It looks faded, but a good composition. Or maybe toss it and do another similar painting.  It’s a popular scenic spot with a lighthouse. Waiting for your advice. . . ~Liz

I picked it up and started painting.

Now that you mentioned Linseed oil, a memory surfaces from the art site a Russian Master now in the US ran for awhile and had lessons and such.  Can't quite recall if it was if you've picked up a painting after having it sit for a period of time, if it had been a little past touch dry.  He'd cut an onion in half and rub the painting with it; said it acted like rubbing it with Linseed Oil.

It was all to make the paint flow better.  No different than Bob Ross or Bill Alexander with their 'Magic or Liquid Clear'.

I like my paint to 'grab'.  There are times when I want the paint to 'flow'.  I'll then add a little Liquin or Walnut Oil to the paint.  I did that with the bubble in the area that's a bit Magneta.

There are times, like in 'Lady' where I've brought it to a point and I'm unsure if what I'm going to do next will work on the first try.  I'll let it get touch dry then coat the whole thing with Liquin and let it dry.

Paint acts different and I have trouble seeing tones as, with my eyesight, there's more 'glare' in it.  Yeah there were places where I had to wipe the newly applied paint as it wasn't right.



liz

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Reply #14 on: January 28, 2018, 10:58:23 PM
 :thankyou: STONEY!  I did a ‘touch up’ on an old painting once and recall Nolan saying to just paint over the spot, and it worked.  I think I’ll try it on a small corner of the canvas and use linseed oil in another spot.  I don’t have Liquin or Walnut oil.  They probably aren’t as sticky as linseed oil. ~Liz


 

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