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Author Topic: What type of frame?  (Read 5894 times)

Maryna

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on: January 14, 2012, 12:25:19 AM
What types of frames goes with what types of paintings? Do you have any examples of what goes well with what?
Can I group different types of paintings with different colours together if they have the same type of frame?

Thanks  :)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


C.Bodine

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Reply #1 on: January 14, 2012, 06:16:11 AM
Maryna,  I think it is a matter of personal choice. I am very fortunate to volunteer in a woodshoop and framing shop at our military base, so I get to make all my frames at a discounted rate.(sometimes even free!! Frame, mats and glass!) From my experience, not just any frame will go with all pictures. The color of the frame or the style just doesn't go with the color or subject of the paintings, so it may be hard to use one type of frame on different pictures. 

I can't seem to help myself! ??? I have framed everything I have painted, so far!! :2funny: (4 paintings-Just can't  believe I did them! )  I thought I would use my hallway as a little gallery, using the "same frame" idea you had, but it didn't seem to work. They each have a beautiful frame that matches the color or mood of the picture.

 
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 06:17:59 AM by C.Bodine »
Christina


Kelley

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Reply #2 on: January 14, 2012, 08:16:34 AM
CB is correct.  Each painting will have a different 'mood' and picking the frame is an individual choice.  I don't typically frame the paintings I sell because I don't know the room decor or personal taste of the person buying it.  Those few that I manage to keep I let my wife pick frames for  :whistle:
Kelley


Maryna

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Reply #3 on: November 15, 2013, 04:48:08 AM
I took my painting that I did on the snowy mountain retreat to have it  framed today. I am going to give it to my mom as a Christmas present.

I have to say this was very hard for me to decide on a frame. I eventually took a kinda dark brown frame that will go around the painting, we are not taking it off the stretchers.

I am just wondering about something. A friend normally frame all her paintings with a thin around it then there is like white board and then a heavy wide frame. Is that how it normally should be done? Or is just putting a frame straight around the painting correct? I know I sound stupid now, but did feel quite stupid at the shop as I didn't know what I wanted.  :confused:

Did get a compliment from another client on my painting though  ;D


"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Germa

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Reply #4 on: November 15, 2013, 06:15:02 AM
The only way to get frames in the same form, but different, to your painting matching colours is buying blank wooden frames and paint them in the desired colour, I think.

For stretched canvasses, one often uses a kind of frame we call baklijst I love them for stretched canvasses, especially when you paint the sides of the canvas too.

I really don't know how you call them in English, I hope the link helps.
They are available in every size you want, blank wood too, so you could paint them in any colour you want.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2013, 07:58:07 AM by Germa »


C.Bodine

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Reply #5 on: November 15, 2013, 06:23:06 AM
Maryna, If you have a "deep" frame, it is okay to use it around your canvas. They tend to be a little more expensive than a regular frame. I have also taken the paintings off the stretcher and mounted them on whiteboard/foam board to get them into a thinner frame. I am not sure if that is technically correct, but I have had no problems with the ones I have done.  I did matt one and found out later you aren't suppose to put a matt on an oil painting!(oops!) I guess as long as I don't need to change the matt, it should be okay!
Christina


musika

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Reply #6 on: November 15, 2013, 07:15:16 AM
I looked on Google Translate and it said "baklijst" was "barge" - uh-oh.

In the UK we call them "floating frames" (or floater frames)
Ray


Germa

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Reply #7 on: November 15, 2013, 07:59:34 AM
That was the translation I got too, I knew it was wrong, but didn't find the right answer.
Thanks Ray!
Floating frame, I hope I will remember that one.


C.Bodine

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Reply #8 on: November 15, 2013, 08:07:55 AM
 I think it is called a floating frame in the US, too. I have never used one of these, so would have no suggestions for you, Maryna.  I can see how this frame would not take away from the painting. Very interesting. The deep frames I am talking about look just like a regular, decorative picture frame, but it has a deeper ledge to cover the canvas sides.
Christina


Germa

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Reply #9 on: November 15, 2013, 08:11:35 AM
I love those floating frames because they show every inch of a painting (over here, they show every cm of a painting ;) )
They are very easy to frame a painting by yourself and look great when the sides are painted too.

Also suitable for canvas boards, just put some small wooden strips on the back, in the right thickness, and use those to screw the frame to the painting.
There are loads of youtube video's on the w.w.w. to show how it's done.


May lynn

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Reply #10 on: November 15, 2013, 04:30:59 PM
 
To all
The floating frame is easy to work with but, it does require a little assembly using what is called offsets.
 A small piece of hardware to hold the canvas in place.  The frames can be used to house shallow or deep canvases.  They work great!!  and they are a quick and professional way to finish off an oil/acrylic
painting.    Approx. 24.00 cnd for a 16 x 20 or 28.00cnd.  20 x 24.   A short video on how to install the offsets can be found at   http://opusartsupplies.com/how/videos?page=5.  Hope this helps.
May lynn


Maryna

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Reply #11 on: November 16, 2013, 12:27:22 AM
I mean sometimes a paintings gets framed with a white boarder panel thing around it, think it is called a mat and then only the final frame. And sometimes it's got like a thin gold frame thingy then the mat and then the bigger frame around it. Do I make sense?

Almost like these http://myframingstore.com/custom-framing/oil-paintings-and-canvas/painting/

Should one frame it like that or just the frame directly to the painting? What looks best?
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 12:29:35 AM by Maryna »
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Germa

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Reply #12 on: November 16, 2013, 01:41:02 AM
Over here, those mats are used for photo's, for drawings, for water colour paintings, for pastels, for every art work that needs glass to protect it, but not for oil or acrylic paintings.


May lynn

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Reply #13 on: November 16, 2013, 02:03:47 AM
Dear Maryna;
If you look at the website you posted under 'custom framing'; watch the slide show and
slide 3 or 4 mention that oils / acrylic are rarely covered with glass.   As Dennis once stated,  he was
told by a museum curator that an oil painting needs to breath and he (the curator) considers that it can take up to 75 years to complete the drying process. 
May lynn


Maryna

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Reply #14 on: November 16, 2013, 03:03:19 AM
 :eyesclosed: no don't want to cover it with glass.

A friend of mine frame all her paintings with those things around it and it looks stunning.

think I am being misunderstood...  :'(
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


 

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