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Author Topic: Fantail  (Read 359 times)

Bhavna

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Reply #15 on: January 23, 2018, 06:56:03 AM
Nice painting :painting: :painting:
Bhavna


robynann

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Reply #16 on: January 24, 2018, 04:35:41 PM
Fabulous painting!! :clap: :clap: :clap:
Art is when you hear a knocking from your soul...
and you answer.....


Happychappy

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Reply #17 on: January 24, 2018, 04:45:58 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Stoney, I find seeing the progression of the painting as it unfolds to a beautiful painting, very interesting indeed.


Patricia
Patricia
Blessed are those who give without remembering and blessed are those who receive without forgetting - anonymous


linley.plester

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Reply #18 on: January 26, 2018, 04:06:31 AM
Definitely helpful. Although in this case, I was searching for a cute little bird in the painting. It took a while before I realized that "Fantail" is the type of winch! :2funny:


liz

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Reply #19 on: January 26, 2018, 07:06:31 PM
Aloha, Stoney!  It’s always good to watch the progress of a new painting and get to see the completion.  I don’t suppose this one will take nearly as long as your ‘Lady’!  Keep up the good work!  :clap: ~Liz


Val

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Reply #20 on: January 27, 2018, 07:18:06 AM
Actually Linley, if memory serves, the fantail of a war ship is the furthest aft deck section of the ship. Stoney will have to verify that, but I think it's close enough  :whistle:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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linley.plester

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Reply #21 on: January 27, 2018, 02:29:40 PM
Ha, ha... wrong AGAIN!!! :2funny:


stoney

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Reply #22 on: January 28, 2018, 06:22:50 PM
Definitely helpful. Although in this case, I was searching for a cute little bird in the painting. It took a while before I realized that "Fantail" is the type of winch! :2funny:

Fantail is the type of stern the DDG had.  If you look from below, it's like a spread fan.

The 'wound drum' you see part of is submarine detection gear which trails behind and outside of the propeller wake which is a sonar detection dead zone.  Further to the right was the hatch down to the electric shop, our store room and the after emergency diesel generating room.  There was another one about 20 feet behind the superstructure behind the bow.  It was accessed via a vertical ladder.

There were times I and the engineman would be hanging onto things to keep from being tossed three feet into the air.  Think the ladder was about 12 feet high.

This is the ship I was on; an Adams Class Destroyer.  The Australian Navy called them 'Perth Class'.



stoney

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Reply #23 on: January 28, 2018, 06:23:52 PM
Aloha, Stoney!  It’s always good to watch the progress of a new painting and get to see the completion.  I don’t suppose this one will take nearly as long as your ‘Lady’!  Keep up the good work!  :clap: ~Liz

No, it didn't.  I completed in back in 2008 in several months.  Cheers.


stoney

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Reply #24 on: January 28, 2018, 06:59:06 PM
Actually Linley, if memory serves, the fantail of a war ship is the furthest aft deck section of the ship. Stoney will have to verify that, but I think it's close enough  :whistle:

Well, it's the stern.  This one happens to be shaped when seen from below like a fan.  So, fantail in this ship's case. (chuckling, and not 'sternly'.)

Bow, Stern, Port, Starboard (used to be Larboard).  Up the mast is 'aloft'.  Going to a lower deck is 'going below'.  Decks above the main deck (where you get on and off the ship) are the 01, 02, 03... level.

If you're going up the mast (134 feet to the top) and the ladder stops about 4 feet from the aircraft warning light at the top (@#$%@#$%@#$@#$%), at the first trap door there's a rotating switch.  It kills power to all radars and radio transmissions.  Every few minutes the P.A. system announces; "Do not rotate or radiate any electronic equipment while men are working aloft."

A main deck, portion of that or another deck, where people are banned from venturing into means the area is 'secured'.  It can also mean closing something or turning off specific equipment.

When we were going to be getting a chopper in (Helo not motorcycle (big grin)) it would come in above the fantail and no one would be allowed (except a damage control and rescue team all set up) aft of the ASROC deck (anti-submarine rocket launcher) which is in the center of the ship.  The mess deck and galley are immediately below.

All hatches and scuttles (the round inset 28 inch hatch) are marked with 'X', 'Y', or 'Z'.  These are conditions of readiness.  'X' or X-Ray are standard sea conditions.  'Y' is a higher level and 'Z' is when you're going into battle.

Ventilation gear is also marked 'W' or 'W inset into a circle.  It's 'William' or 'Circle William'.  If memory serves 'Circle William' is the most severe and cuts off the ship from outside air.  This would be if a Chemical or Nuclear attack was expected.

If you had fire you'd secure ventilation in the affected area and close hatches to keep the smoke from going through the whole ship.

For flooding you'd close all hatches and kill electricity to those compartments.  Everyone's very aware the speed of flooding may require the sealing of compartments when there are personnel inside.  They had to do that in the first USN ship in a collision last year.

For a nuclear attack.  Well, it all depends on the strength of the blast and how close it is.  The ship I was on had three repair lockers (I was the electrician responsible for the aft part of the ship.  As Duty Electrician I had to know how to kill power to every compartment on the ship.)

Anyway, one person from each repair locker and from other points was part of the nuclear decontamination teams.  You'd be in rubber boots and gloves, face mask, and OBA (oxygen breathing apparatus), rubber impregnated canvas suit with all joints masking taped.  You'd go out with buckets and long scrub brushes on broom handles and scrub areas outside the skin of the ship free from radiation.

For a nerve agent-we'd all die.  Each repair locker had one kit with an atropine injector.  You had to detect it and inject withing seven seconds.  Chemical attacks there was various detection papers.

Biological attacks.  Well. There was one berthing area where the bodies of those killed would be stored to the Navy later could figure out what killed the crew.

The mess decks as well as the Wardroom (Officer's Country) would be an emergency surgical suite.  We had a Chief Corpsman (E7-9) and a Petty Officer or two and a couple of lower ranking folks. 

As electricians there were emergency power terminals and cables through the ship where you could get power through destroyed compartments (Like the Cole when the inflatable suicide boat crammed with explosives blew up a few years ago) to get power to other areas (unless those armored pipe cable runs were destroyed).  In which case, you'd have to figure it out.

If you lost all steering power and hydraulics, there was a lever you could pull back and forth to incrementally move the rudder.  Don't recall the number of times it would take to get the rudder to move a fraction of a degree.

Many a time, due to high waves, the main deck would be secured.  You'd be eating and look out the porthole and see green.

When the main deck is open there's a person at the back of the ship next to the bulkhead ( 4 hour watches ) who's in constant communication with the Bridge in case someone goes overboard.

I'm sure that's more than anyone wanted to know, but it shed's light into a world that's quite alien for many people.  If anyone has a question, ask.  I don't pretend I can answer them all, but I'll do the best I can.


stoney

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Reply #25 on: January 28, 2018, 07:00:44 PM
Ha, ha... wrong AGAIN!!! :2funny:

Nah.  You were doing your best to try to figure out an alien world.  It's all good.  :)

Everyone's got all sorts of stuff they're aware of that others wouldn't have the first clue about.


stoney

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Reply #26 on: January 28, 2018, 07:04:51 PM
We all were well aware (as the Cole found out) that if we were to take a hit in the engine room you were in there's no getting out.  In my case, I was surrounded by lighting transformers and electrical control panels and switching gear.  I'd be a puff of ash in the breeze.

There were two ways out from each engine room.  One via the main ladder and another which was a steel tube and vertical ladder accessed from the lower level of the engine room. 


Annie.

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Reply #27 on: February 14, 2018, 06:37:14 AM
Stoney,
 I really enjoyed reading your dissertation. Fascinating to learn a wee bit about a life I will never experience myself.

I really enjoy your step description, visual and text, really help me undrstand process.
Thanks
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


stoney

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Reply #28 on: February 14, 2018, 10:50:51 AM
Stoney,
 I really enjoyed reading your dissertation. Fascinating to learn a wee bit about a life I will never experience myself.

I really enjoy your step description, visual and text, really help me undrstand process.
Thanks

Thank you, kindly.  Just glad folks found it of interest.


stoney

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Reply #29 on: February 14, 2018, 10:56:00 AM
From the "You're Never too old to learn something new about an old subject" category.

An item I wasn't aware of.  I was aware of the effects; but not the label of no to a couple hours of 'lay down' time (too exhausted to sleep as odd as that sounds) which can continue for eight weeks, or more, while at sea.

It could also apply to other branches of service, but those folks would have to 'chime in'.

The documentary was on the loss of 16,000 men in 9 A.C.E., (three Roman Legions) to the tribes in Germany (Germania).  An American Lt. General indicated that people who've had no sleep in 24 hours are legally drunk.  The Roman soldiers had been awake and fighting for over Two days.

So we were legally drunk for eight weeks (however long you were at sea).  Rather doubt this was quantified until many many years after I left the USN. 


 

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