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Author Topic: Doing a Painting More than Once  (Read 182 times)

patindaytona

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on: October 09, 2017, 05:42:35 AM
I have several really great reference photos that I've painted from. I have done a few of them more than once because wasn't satisfied. Thinking of doing one again. How many here have done something more than once?
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Sacgal/Sharon

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Reply #1 on: October 09, 2017, 12:01:57 PM
I used to do that a lot - especially when i first started taking Dennis' watercolor classes. I'm such a perfectionist, if it wasn't exactly like his, I would start all over...and it was always better the second time! I do it sometimes now - not too often. Usually if I don't like what I've painted now, I tend to throw it away and start with a whole new subject!
Cheers,
Sharon


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: October 09, 2017, 12:08:55 PM
Sharon thanks. I've done a few 3 times or more. Just wondered if it's only me.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Sacgal/Sharon

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Reply #3 on: October 09, 2017, 12:33:03 PM
It’s not just you. And i should do it more often. Every painting we do we learn a lot.
Cheers,
Sharon


liz

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Reply #4 on: October 09, 2017, 06:26:43 PM
Hi Pat, I have touched up 2 paintings done a few years ago, but not done anything over.  Once or twice I took a painting that was recently finished and did some glazing here and there.  Most of the time I just look at the paintings at the my 'mistakes' or the way I used to paint, and I think what would I do to improve it.  I am giving away 2 or 3 of my larger paintings to a fund raiser, but one I will not give away is Portofino which I painted with Nolan because I don't think I could paint it again! It is my husband's favorite anyway!


Question: Are you painting over on the same painting or getting out a new canvas?  IMO if I didn't like something I painted and wanted to do it over, I would get a clean canvas.  Then hopefully it will be better and I would trash the other original painting.  ~Liz


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: October 10, 2017, 08:50:25 AM
Liz, that's what i have done to practically all of them too. But after around 7 years now, I'm just beginning to become less particular about things. I hang on to things tenaciously!
Good you're giving away a couple... I just started the new one this morning..about 20 min. worth and that's it, blocking in all this foliage areas. Some things require time and some don't. Doesn't mean it's better putting in more time. But this will be the second version for this one.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #6 on: October 10, 2017, 12:13:05 PM
Hi Pat,


it's good that you mentioned second 'version' which means you're not doing the same thing.  Your results should be different then.


Question, I have one painting that I didn't like, painted from my imagination which I guess wasn't a good composition.  Have you covered over a canvas to reuse it?  I painted one coat gesso over, but the dark paint shows through.  Does it make any difference because any underpainting or layered painting will cover it anyway.


 :painting: Liz




patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: October 11, 2017, 08:20:28 AM
I did that for the first time only a month ago Liz. It wouldn't make any difference like you said....it's going to be covered anyway...just like you would tone it first.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


linley.plester

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Reply #8 on: October 12, 2017, 09:14:24 PM
Hi.. I don't paint in oils, only acrylics and watercolour. I have painted on the backside of old watercolours a few times, and I often re-Gesso acrylics. The worst I've done is paint out Einstein about 20 times and started the picture all over again each time on the same canvas. (He's still a work in progress after 6 months!)That was a pain, because I had gotten enthusiastic and actually painted little ridges into the hair for texture. I had to sand them out when I started the face all over again, again. My acrylics are so in expert at this stage that I regard most of them as experiments, so I don't think it really matters for me. But some very famous artists have economized by painting over old canvases. This has been discovered by art historians when the paintings are being restored. the old painting shows up when the canvas is X-rayed.


liz

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Reply #9 on: October 13, 2017, 10:33:11 PM
Hi Linley,  when working with acrylic paint I've them very forgiving and they can take a lot of repainting.  This is unlike oil which can get tacky and not dry for months or even a year or more and have oily patches or shiny areas that show up in light or when you look at the painting from different angles.  I think it's possible to do a fairly good acrylic painting with a recycled canvas.  Some people cover their canvas with leftover muds from cleaning off their palettes.  That may work well, too, as underpainting, without using gesso. ~Liz


linley.plester

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Reply #10 on: October 14, 2017, 02:48:52 AM
Thanks for the reassurance Liz. I've been afraid I was piling  so much paint on the canvas that it might sag. :o :'( Eek!


 

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