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Author Topic: Artist's Who Don't Ever do Portraits  (Read 171 times)

patindaytona

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on: September 30, 2017, 04:54:06 AM
I've done a good amount of portraits, and i find they are difficult because you have to be more exact with the color as well as the values in the right places, not to mention compostion dead on.
Somehow i feel if i don't add portraits to my work then it's a cop out. Might need Dennis or Nolan's take on this, but are their any (or alot?) of artist's who NEVER do portraits. I mean accomplished artists.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Val

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Reply #1 on: September 30, 2017, 04:29:41 PM
Well, I have managed to draw a few (what I consider) passably decent graphite portraits, I have to admit that painting one still evades me.  I'd go so far as to say the first one I ever tried is probably the best of the lot. Unfortunately for him it appears his skin is melting! I may try again at some point but I'm quite happy doing other subjects. I don't think it's a cop out at all, I think one just needs to find ones strength and dive in with all the passion you can muster. It's more about the creation than the subject.

I know I have watched a number of accomplished professional artists who do nothing but landscapes, or seascapes, and have become friends with a number who do only animals. As much as I would love to do portraits, it was always something I wanted to do, I just seem to be better with different subjects. No worries on my part, if we were all good at the same thing it would be a bloody boring old world!  ;)
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: October 03, 2017, 07:14:07 AM
Guess what Val. I'm doing a portrait...but actually it's a scene with John Lennon in it. He's in the kitchen. An old photograph. I thought it was a very candid one and really liked it. It's going to be a drawing. I'm about 2/3 of the way thru. I did his face the very first thing to get it over with while i'm fresh...turned out good. The rest pots and pans ete etc...alot of detailed stuff...but starting to get looser as i go. As far as painting, i really am going to do more landscape things instead though. You FEEL a painting, and if that's so, then any subject is good.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


liz

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Reply #3 on: October 03, 2017, 10:57:54 AM
Pat, I would do John Lennon, too.  I did a drawing of Elvis and you could recognize him, but when I did Mark Twain, he looked like Groucho Marx.  So imagine if I painted a living person and it came out unflattering or they told me I made them ugly looking (in case I did).  I don't mind figures or profile angles.  No, I may never do portraits of humans still living.  But that's me.  I am too timid and lacking in confidence all around. ~Liz  ???


Val

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Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 11:20:00 AM
You've got me intrigued Pat. Good on you. I'm finishing up my last colour chart for my pastels.... at least I hope it's the last one. Getting closer to getting on! Exciting but scary. I guess we all go through it, don't we? Look forward to seeing it, I'm quite the fan of Lennon.  O0
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

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patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: October 03, 2017, 03:07:11 PM
I've done at least two i can think of of him...one drawing and a painting. This will be my third. He does have a very characteristic face, but I have read volumes on him besides.
It seems to me that the connection between the brain-hand-canvas is much more direct when using pencil instead of a brush. Not hard to understand why. When I draw I am really more in tune with the values.
I still...............feel like i;M cheating no matter what and who has told me I'lm not.......when it comes to the tracing.  When I show someone I'm sure they are thinking, wow, it's all been done free hand! But all the tracing, the locations and outlines, of the eyes, nose, mouth, etc....I know their's alot of work after that with the values and shading, but it's sure is a shortcut. Somehow, I feel a bit like a fake...just a little bit.
While I'm talking, just a note....it's good to do not too much in one day on anything, I'm finding because after a period of time, for me, a pretty short period, I'm starting to get ahead of myself and rush things. Better to not rush and take a piece out of it a day at a time, if it takes that long, instead of being too much to hurry and get it done. Easy to say, i know.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 03:10:22 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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