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Author Topic: Einstein continues  (Read 232 times)

linley.plester

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on: September 03, 2017, 01:12:20 AM
(reference photo)
I have painted and repainted this portrait about twenty times,all on the one canvas. The layer of paint is getting rather thick. I need help on 2 counts:
(a)I'm having terrible difficulty with the skin tones. So far his face has been brown like Gandhi, yellow as if he's liverish, green as if he's a Martian, purple (!), bright pink.... The problem is that the colours darken (a lot!) as they dry. I've been looking at Nolan's lessons and lots of YouTubes and have come to the conclusion that I have been applying the paint in layers that are too thick, and then being surprised when the colours in the previous layers dominate my thin final glazes... I'm going to try Atelier interactive paints this time and see if I can pick colours that will not darken as much.Any advice?  :help:
(b) I would like a critique of my monotone... the left eye is wonky and the hairline is strange.... and there are probably lots of other faults too. What I thought was a good drawing is misbehaving in paint this time.  :help:
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 01:32:43 AM by linley.plester »


Val

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Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 01:33:09 AM
Unmistakably Einstein Linley. Unfortunately I haven't looked at acrylics in about 6.5 yrs., have you tried mixing the skin tone opposed to glazing?
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


linley.plester

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Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 02:12:15 AM
I'm glad you can recognize him, Val.  Yes, I've been mixing the skin tones carefully all along. Someone told me to mix a mid-tone, then work out lighter and darker tones, but to paint the mid-tone first and then paint the other tones. So I've been plastering on the mid-tone, and then trying to blend the other colours... The blending worked well, but the colours seem to change when they go on top of each other.. eg: I'd mix a beige skin tone and then when I painted the darks over it, it would suddenly turn green... So I've been avoiding adding blue, and even started to use a zinc white instead of titanium white since zinc is supposedly creamier and less blue. I'm not sure how I achieved purple...something to do with burnt umber .. Anyway, since thick applications of paint don't seem to work, I thought I'd still try mixing the colours, but apply them in cautious thin layers from the start, over this monotone painting, and try putting each tone in the right place from the beginning. I've been trying to paint a nice sun-tanned bronze but it's very elusive... I've been working on him since May, a complete change of complexion once a week. He's supposed to have said, "You haven't failed until you give up." :2funny:


Val

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Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 04:37:37 AM
"You never fail until you stop trying"  Keep on  :painting:    You'll get there.  O0   
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


mea hamo pena

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Reply #4 on: September 03, 2017, 08:46:04 AM
Linley

I love it.  It's enjoyable to look at.

Except for his hairline looking too rigidly heart-shaped, I think you did a fabulous job.   Compare it to the reference.  Maybe soften the line a bit.

aloha

mea
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nolan

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Reply #5 on: September 03, 2017, 12:31:16 PM
to mix your skin tones, pic a colour photo which has good clear colours then use my method to match at least four of the colours.
Block those colours in, in the correct places and blend. As you are using acrylic, do one section at a time, like the cheek, top lip, eyelid, etc. and finish it before moving on.

To reduce the amount of colour change when dry use a good quality acrylic. The better quality acrylics have less of a colour shift than the cheap ones because they have more pigment in them.
To test your colours do a sample on a scrap piece of paper, blitz it with the hair dryer to see how much each colour has changed, then adjust the paints and retest until you get the final colours you want O0


Happychappy

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Reply #6 on: September 03, 2017, 01:54:39 PM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Linley it is unmistakenly Einstein. You have done a great job.  However, looking at the reference photograph, it would seem that his eyes are slit from laughing and not open, showing the actual eyeballs which you have drawn ... and this is maybe why you are saying that the left eye is wonky.   However, wait for the other more experienced artists to give their impression.  However, as I said, you have done a good job for sure.


Patricia 
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linley.plester

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Reply #7 on: September 03, 2017, 04:32:22 PM
Val: I'm beginning to think that particular quote is a little too appropriate  :D. for some reason this particular portrait has become very important to me. But it started out as a training exercise because I wanted to do a portrait of two newly happy friends.
Patricia: I think you are right about the eyes being slits because he is laughing. I had been wondering if he had messed up his mascara!
Mea: the heart shape wasn't there in my original drawing. It's sneaked in via all the corrections over the last few months. Thanks for pointing it out.
Nolan: Thanks for the advice. I have a set of Atelier Interactive which I have been saving for when I do your lessons on acrylics, and portrait painting. I wanted to do them immediately after finishing Mr E. I guess I should have done the lessons first. Lol! I think I might break out the Ateliers for this occasion. Then maybe I can start doing more of your lessons with a clear head. At the moment I'm obsessing over Mr E night and day. I even dream about the wretched painting!
« Last Edit: September 03, 2017, 05:13:25 PM by linley.plester »


Gita

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Reply #8 on: September 11, 2017, 01:31:48 PM
Linley, this portrait of Einstein looks so original! I like the monchormy skin tone and the slanted eyes gives it a cartoony look, which I also like. It looks to me as if you wanted it that way all through! The hair is also come out well. Only the mouth part is a bit "unfilled". In the photo the mouth is a bit darker and I can see a tooth shining through.
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linley.plester

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Reply #9 on: September 12, 2017, 04:20:19 PM
Hi Gita. Thanks you for your useful observations. I had thought that highlight was a flaw in the photocopy, but a tooth makes more sense. ;D I'm still tweaking this underpainting. When I change an eye, the other eye needs attention. etc, etc. At the moment I'm waiting on an order of fixative, so that if I mess up the skin tones this time I can wipe it without obliterating the original drawing. I held it up to a mirror yesterday.I've read about this technique many times but never tried it before. It is supposed to make the faults more obvious. It worked! I think it works for all paintings, not just portraits. No doubt Dennis and Nolan have told us about it many times, but it went in one ear and out the other! :uglystupid2:


Val

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Reply #10 on: September 13, 2017, 12:53:51 AM
I held it up to a mirror yesterday.I've read about this technique many times but never tried it before. It is supposed to make the faults more obvious. It worked! I think it works for all paintings, not just portraits.

Indeed it will work for any drawings or paintings Linley. Another trick of the trade in your arsenal!  ;)
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


 

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