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Author Topic: WetInWet and Black Watercolour Pencil Exercises  (Read 331 times)

linley.plester

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on: August 08, 2017, 05:17:38 AM
  8"x5" approx (thanks to advice from Mea, Liz & Stoney)
  ditto sizewise
bigger


This technique draws the subject in black watercolour pencil and then wets the sheet of paper front and back. When the w/c pencil is dampened it blurs and runs. You then quick underpaint the key colours while it is still wet, and then go back in later when the paper has dried to strengthen the final details. A bit like Dennis's pen and ink. It's supposed to produce a loose painting. Needs very high quality paper to take all that moisture. I had 3 tries, one big, 2 small. Never really controlled the water... rivulets of colour running down the page, and none left on the roses!  I don't think I quite achieved loose either. Not sure I'm a fan of loose anyway. Just looks messy most of the time unless the artist is highly skilled. Maybe I'll like them better in a few days time, when I've gotten used to the idea.
Don't know if you remember my blue gums paintings? well, I cut them up a scrap. Today I found 2 corners that I really like, so those bits have gone back in my box of saved paintings... might use them as post-cards,  ::)
« Last Edit: August 08, 2017, 05:24:35 AM by linley.plester »


mea hamo pena

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Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 08:33:46 AM
Linley

This looks like an interesting technique - might be fun to try.

I love your rosey pink tones.

Great job on the clear glass jars.

Here's something I have observed -- stems look different on the right and left when they enter the water, but seem to look the same in the center of the vase.  Try it out and see what I mean.  The one on the left will break to the left more when it gets below the water line and the one on the right will break more to the right.  Odd, but that's nature.

aloha

mea
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Val

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Reply #2 on: August 08, 2017, 09:56:41 AM
That would be refraction of light, a fascinating subject.

Linley, I think you did very well. I played about with this style quite a while back and the effects can be really amazing. I used water soluble graphite on mine. It is really tricky getting the correct amount of dampness on the paper but with a bit of practice you'll get it. It sounds like the paper was too wet when you added the paint. Something I happen to know quite a bit about!  :whistle:    :2funny:


 
Cheers, Val

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njnjgirl

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Reply #3 on: August 08, 2017, 10:49:59 AM
I like these alot. I rather like the "messy" look in watercolor.   Makes for a light airy painting that seemed to have been painted with happy abandon.. I will have to have a try at this technique.  I have also seen this same technique done with ink that blurs out..a very neat style.  :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:

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robynann

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Reply #4 on: August 08, 2017, 11:36:54 AM
I like that messy look also. I love your work...
Art is when you hear a knocking from your soul...
and you answer.....


Happychappy

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Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 11:42:57 AM
 :clap: :clap: :clap:  Interesting technique Linley and I think you have done it well.  Thanks for the information which is always helpful if one feels inclined to give it a try.


Patricia
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linley.plester

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Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 12:28:34 AM
 :thankyou:Mea, Val, Patricia, njn girl, Robyn. Thanks in particular to Mea for the info about the stems. Its winter here, so no roses, except at the florists, so this was a copy of someone else's painting, and all my vases are opaque, anyway. It's really useful to know this. NJn... I wondered if watersoluble graphite might not be as good. Dennis used an Artline marker which bled when touched with water in on of his lessons. I thought that was really neat. And of course there is no reason you can't use colours other than black. I think a dark blue would be good for some subjects, or even red. Lots of things to experiment with. So many ideas to try.  Mea the pinks were achieved with Aliarin Crimson Permanent, Quinacridone Coral and Quinacridone Magenta.


Gita

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Reply #7 on: August 13, 2017, 12:34:18 PM
Thanks for sharing this technique, Linley. I like the results you did, especially the roses. The colours seem to be vibrant. From which firm are the CPs?
Life is more exciting with art....


linley.plester

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Reply #8 on: August 13, 2017, 05:49:37 PM
Hi Gita... LOL I'm not sure what a CP is but since you mentioned colour, the watercolour paints were mainly Daniel Smith. They are frightfully expensive here i Australia, and may be just as expensive in Europe, but the pigments are very high quality and they are very open about qualities such as light fastness, granulation, transparency, and staining and exactly which pigments they use. I prefer them to Windsor and Newton (which are the other high quality watercolour available in Australia) who don't tell you which pigments they use and aren't always very careful about light fastness. They also like to call their colours by obscure names like Windsor Red or Windsor green so that you have no idea which pigments or mixtures of pigments are in your paint. You might be able to buy these colours in Sennelier or Talens or Schmidt at a reasonable price over there. I understand that Schmidt in particular is very high quality. The quinacridone colours were developed comparatively recently. You might also like Quin Burnt Orange, Quin Gold. They are a good transparent substitute for some of the earth colours like Burnt sienna and yellow ochre.


Sacgal/Sharon

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Reply #9 on: August 14, 2017, 09:31:05 AM
Love your use of the watercolor pencils, Linley (although you spelled "watercolor" wrong  - haha! You Aussies always need to throw another vowel into the mix!) And I'm so impressed with your loose creativity as well as finding ways to "reuse" portions of failed paintings!  :clap: :clap:
Cheers,
Sharon


linley.plester

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Reply #10 on: August 14, 2017, 04:49:50 PM
Sharon, I never throw anything out w/o finding at least one other use for it! My mother lived through the great Depression and drummed recycling into my soul long before it ever became trendy!


TeresaM

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Reply #11 on: August 15, 2017, 12:42:52 AM
Linely your colours are very  vibrant. Everything to do with art is expensive in Australia. This method of painting sounds too complicated for me (ha ha).

Sharon the spelling of "colour " used by Linely is correct used in all other English speaking countries except the USA (haha)  :flowers:
« Last Edit: August 20, 2017, 06:05:05 PM by TeresaM »
TeresaM
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Annie.

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Reply #12 on: August 16, 2017, 05:12:14 AM
Just saw this post.  I love the effect on the roses but imagine one needs a lot of mastering of all that water to acheive the loose effect.

Surely Sharon was teasing.  I used to keep a list of word spelling for British and American English languages, something difficult when English is not ones mother tongue.  I recently gave up, my focus is now communication and not grammar.  I hope Mea will not read this, her hair (hairs to French people :2funny: ) will stand up.

In Canada, art supply are also very expensive compare to the cost in the US.  Also, we spell 'color' or 'colour' depending on who we write to, our mood of the day, outside temperature, and what bad stories we saw on the news that day...  :coffee:
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


mea hamo pena

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Reply #13 on: August 16, 2017, 07:37:28 AM
No worries, Annie.  Yes, the message meaning is more important than the grammar.  If I had my way, all written communication would be phonetic - write it the way it sounds!

aloha

mea
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linley.plester

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Reply #14 on: August 16, 2017, 06:23:22 PM
Hi Mea... I always thought phonetic spelling would be a good idea until I met a Yorkshire man , who, telling of his reaction of a minor earthquake scare, said he had grabbed the little poopy and run outside. I thought he was talking about his new baby(!) but it turned out that the wife and baby were out shopping...so the little poopy was their new daschund puppy. The Yorkshire accent pronounces the "uh" sound as "oo" as in look, book and cook.  So the Muppets are Moopets. (But then they pronounce Look, and Cook, and Book with an "ooh" sound so they become Loohk, and Boohk, and Coohk! So regional accents could really confuse things. (For that matter, Australians roll around the floor laughing when New Zealanders try to order a half dozen eggs... ""six" comes out as "sex" . H ow eggs Mr Bloggs?"  "I'll have sex please, Mrs Jones."  :knuppel2: !!!!! Sorry Gita, I can't remember, how to spell sausage dog.


 

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