Paint Basket Member Art Forum

Author Topic: Help please  (Read 342 times)

TeresaM

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 650
on: August 18, 2017, 03:33:24 PM
I have been looking through past topics and cannot find an answer.  I am painting a picture of my 1st daffodils that hsve popoed up early in my garden.

 So i add the first colour eg to the daffodils - lemon yellow. I let it dry, then start on the 2nd colour a bit darker over the top of the 1st colour, but every time after i have added this I get a hard line.  The more i try to soften this hard line and think i have succeeded i get another hard line. It is driving me insane :banghead:   

or when i try to soften it the paint lifts off  :help:
 
What am i doing wrong. Am I using too much water with the 2nd coat?
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 01:00:57 AM by TeresaM »
TeresaM
"It always seems impossible until it's done" Nelson Mandela


mea hamo pena

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 13022
  • Oh, my! ART!
    • Long Lost Art by MaryAnne Long
Reply #1 on: August 18, 2017, 04:14:25 PM
TeresaM

I do not know the answer to your question, but will experiment this afternoon to see if I can figure out what works best.  My first thought, though, is that a dry brush technique might work best.

I love experimentation. What brand of paint are you using and what kind/weight of paper?

aloha

mea
« Last Edit: August 18, 2017, 04:18:06 PM by mea hamo pena »
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


mea hamo pena

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 13022
  • Oh, my! ART!
    • Long Lost Art by MaryAnne Long
Reply #2 on: August 18, 2017, 05:00:47 PM
Teresa

I found the secret to avoiding the hard lines is to immediately blur out the edge with a barely damp brush.


I used five different lemon yellows, including gouache.  I used the same QOR Dioxazine Purple in all mixes to create the shadow color.  I made the shadow on the left of the petal and just a simple circle on the right so I could practice more blurring the edges. 

Hope that was helpful to you.  It was to me.

aloha

mea
« Last Edit: August 30, 2017, 01:39:15 PM by mea hamo pena »
A day without art is like a day without sunshine.


TeresaM

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 650
Reply #3 on: August 18, 2017, 11:29:07 PM
:thankyou: for trying Mea but it does help.
 I am using Windsor and Newton paints on 300gsm Canson watercolour paper.

I don't mean just adding paint in one tiny spot. If you cover all but leavinga  tiny bit of the yellow colour this happens.

I have blurred the edge after it happens with a barely damp brush.

I want to know why i get this edge in the fist place?
« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 12:58:52 AM by TeresaM »
TeresaM
"It always seems impossible until it's done" Nelson Mandela


linley.plester

  • Palette
  • *
  • Posts: 392
  • Never say die!
Reply #4 on: August 30, 2017, 06:39:04 AM
Teresa, I'm far from expert, but I think you need to blur the edge as you paint the first colour ie: before it dries. I've had some success by not painting quite to the edge of where I want it to blend/soften and then, with a clean damp brush working back towards the wet colour. You have to keep on cleaning your brush between strokes. This allows the colour to move delicately into the newly damp area and fade out.


dennis

  • Administrator
  • Master Artist
  • *
  • Posts: 7008
Reply #5 on: August 30, 2017, 12:49:22 PM
When a wash ends up against the dry paper you will always get a hard line. The secret is that the pigment must fade out BEFORE it reaches the dry paper. I have actually demonstrated this in many of my classes. As Mary-Ann says, use a damp brush, lightly, to soften the edges where needed, but this is not always the best solution.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 19079
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #6 on: August 31, 2017, 01:51:37 AM
Teresa, now this is something I know about! Happened to me quite often, still does now and again.  :doh: Dennis shows this well in many of the earlier lessons, especially the florals.

Here is my go at the Hibiscus lesson from a few years back. You can see where I didn't use enough water, or didn't take the water out far enough to properly diffuse the paint. It does take practice to get the water balance correct, and a very light touch.


I did much better in this one of the lilies a bit later on.


Just keep practicing, it will come.  O0
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


linley.plester

  • Palette
  • *
  • Posts: 392
  • Never say die!
Reply #7 on: August 31, 2017, 04:03:43 PM
Val, these are lovely. Even if they are not perfect. They are wonderful encouragement. I always get rather lost when I attempt watercolour. I'm probably trying to do paintings that are too complex for my abilities, but occasionally one turns out OK. Must do more of Dennis's lessons and build my skills gradually.


TeresaM

  • Paint Brush
  • *
  • Posts: 650
Reply #8 on: August 31, 2017, 10:32:04 PM
Thank you Linley.
Thank you Dennis.
Thank you Val I do believe that you understood what i meant, as i was talking about adding one colour over another and i do believe practice, practice and eventually it works out. I absolutely love your paintings  :thankyou:  :clap:

Everyone a good example of what I was trying to convey is in the new blue banner heading of Paintbasket the blue hard line just near the red writing. I was trying to stop that from happening on my painting. 
TeresaM
"It always seems impossible until it's done" Nelson Mandela


Val

  • Global Moderator
  • Master Artist
  • *****
  • Posts: 19079
  • SMILE, It's a brand new day!
Reply #9 on: September 01, 2017, 02:18:12 AM
 You will get there Teresa, just keep painting!  O0         :cheering: :cheering: :cheering:
Cheers, Val

”Creativity is allowing yourselves to make mistakes. Work on knowing which ones to keep!”

- Alvaro Castagnet


 

SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal