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Author Topic: The Worse Thing An Artist Can Do!  (Read 370 times)

linley.plester

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Reply #15 on: July 26, 2017, 04:40:14 PM
Stoney.... :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: I had heard O'Tooles' Law, but didn't know it had a name. I remember when instant coffee first became available in Australia. Brewed coffee was almost unheard of. Aussie children were introduced to weak tea at an early age, and tea was the panacea for all ills. Now brewed coffee is available everywhere, and the new generation drink "dirty" tea, a mixture of brewed coffee and spiced tea. What is the world coming to....? :smiley6600:


liz

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Reply #16 on: July 27, 2017, 04:41:32 PM
Dirty tea. 
If you use glasses for rinsing your brushes and are drinking from another glass, be careful of drinking 'dirty tea'.  Never heard of it before, but it's a good word for the glass you rinse your brushes in.  Dirty tea, indeed! ~Liz


stoney

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Reply #17 on: August 02, 2017, 02:21:55 PM
Stoney.... :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: :2funny: I had heard O'Tooles' Law, but didn't know it had a name. I remember when instant coffee first became available in Australia. Brewed coffee was almost unheard of. Aussie children were introduced to weak tea at an early age, and tea was the panacea for all ills. Now brewed coffee is available everywhere, and the new generation drink "dirty" tea, a mixture of brewed coffee and spiced tea. What is the world coming to....? :smiley6600:

'Dirty tea' is a new one on me.

When I was stationed in Scotland as a youth, pubs didn't have refrigerators under the bar, nor was the beer cold.  Dart boards were everywhere and pickled eggs were sold by where the sailors went through UK Customs (every time they went on or off the ship).

While stationed there I had bought a set of short but heavy (25g.) darts.  I don't ever recall drinking coffee in town.  The beer was stronger than in the US (might as well drink water) and un-carbonated.  The bars closed at 10pm, I think, so we'd go the the USN club across from the pier have a beer (carbonated) while waiting for the top of the hour boat back to the ships.  The running joke was the carbonation supercharged the alcohol effects.

Years later spent three weeks in Edinburgh (it was a bunch of people from around the world meeting there).  Many pubs had under counter
beer refrigerators and dart boards were fewer.  I had brought those same darts with me and had a chance to throw them again.  They've not been touched since that time almost twenty years ago.

Anyway, the gentleman was kind enough to drive back to where I was stationed all those years ago.  I'm sure I was very excited to board the ferry again from Gourock, Scotland to Dunoon.
Then a short drive to Sandbank where the pier and customs post was.

Had a hefty shock.  An area had been reclaimed from the sea with rock covered with asphalt, fenced with a wooden white fence and opened for Officer's use three days before I transferred back to the 'States. 

Weeds now grew through the asphalt and the paint on the degraded fence was peeling.  We did stop at the pub I used to frequent.  There was no longer a dart board and there was a refrigerator under the bar.  People were drinking coffee instead of tea.  I had a beer sitting in one of the spots I used to occupy all those years ago.  Even got a picture of me there.  :)

People tried to duplicate photos of me at Edinburgh Castle and Calton Hill (Edinburgh again) to match one's taken a life time ago.

Murphy (of Murphy's Law) was a USAF Captain in charge of safety and something else I can't recall at a flight test center.  They were still trying to figure out G forces and the effects on the human body.

It was thought then that 9 G's would kill a guy.  A flight surgeon took all sorts of rocket sled rides and hellacious deceleration to know first hand how best to secure pilots in the cockpit amid ejection seat experiments.  I believe the most he took was 18 G's which almost killed him.  He was finally given a direct order of no more.

That same flight surgeon was the person behind seat belts in cars which reduced the death rate in collisions.


stoney

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Reply #18 on: August 02, 2017, 02:22:37 PM
Add <cough> flavouring..... ;)


liz

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Reply #19 on: August 04, 2017, 09:47:35 PM
Hi, STONEY!  I LOVE your stories!  I don't know about you, but oldsters have great long term memory and sometimes not so good remembering what they opened the cupboard for!  I remember when I was a child during WWII the shades that were over the windows.  My dad and I would look at Life magazines that chronicled war time activities.  My dad never had a son, but 3 daughters, I being the oldest played with a wooden crank machine gun.  My mother would look for me to do chores and I would see her walking back and forth from high up on the mango tree in our yard.  But you tell the best stories!!!  O0  ~Liz


stoney

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Reply #20 on: August 05, 2017, 11:03:52 AM
Hi, STONEY!  I LOVE your stories!  I don't know about you, but oldsters have great long term memory and sometimes not so good remembering what they opened the cupboard for!  I remember when I was a child during WWII the shades that were over the windows.  My dad and I would look at Life magazines that chronicled war time activities.  My dad never had a son, but 3 daughters, I being the oldest played with a wooden crank machine gun.  My mother would look for me to do chores and I would see her walking back and forth from high up on the mango tree in our yard.  But you tell the best stories!!!  O0  ~Liz

Thank you for the kind words.  I'm 'no spring chicken' any longer and, in the main, the craziest stuff happened during my Navy days and not the USAF days.  There was one crazy 'cross over' from the Navy days which I found out about on the opposite end of the country during my USAF days.  Depending on viewpoint, that could have been trumped by a local neurologist my doctor sent me too some years ago.

The scariest thing, for me, is that all my stories are told as they happened.  And, yeah, I've got the problem of remembering what it is I was looking for.

That ship in Scotland was a floating submarine dry dock which was built during WW2.  Plenty of photos are online.

We knew the Russians had nukes with 'our name on it' and the running joke (as the only armament we had was a possible hunting rifle the Captain was rumored to have) was we'd paint a bulls-eye in the middle of the ship and score the first nuke.


 

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