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Author Topic: Freedom  (Read 1470 times)

patindaytona

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on: December 24, 2011, 03:14:14 PM
I deleted a ton of my notes, I've been collecting for over a year now. I would be alot more creative I think if i just painted using my own ideas about the use of color, shadows etc. I am finally realizing that so many artists SKIP some things, and others perfect some things. You can't put all the ideas into your paintings. In other words, you can't be Van Gogh and Picasso at the same time. If you just follow your own instincts, you will end up doing some famous artist's style without even realizing it.
I even find out I do somethings in a painting...only later to read that it is some kind of "technique" invented by someone 200 years ago without even knowing I did that!
« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 03:17:42 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #1 on: December 24, 2011, 03:29:34 PM
Our studios have been producing excellent artists over the years we have been teaching. The best advice I can give is this: Look for a teacher (can be us or any other good teacher for that matter) that has the style and quality you are aiming for.

THEN, stick to that teacher for as long as you are able to. This jumping from one teacher to another syndrome is bad news as more than often the one contradicts the other in actual facts, as well as painting methods - this just leads to terrible confusion and frustration and too many don't even know how to teach properly.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #2 on: December 24, 2011, 03:33:25 PM
It's mainly jumping and searching websites such as googling : Cast Shadow Colors, etc. It really can be addicting to search info on things such as this simply because it all available.

I really think that the rationalizing and actual painting process are very difficult to mix simultaneously. Hey Dennis, can you help explain this chart to me... ;D ;D
« Last Edit: December 24, 2011, 03:57:44 PM by patindaytona »
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


dennis

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Reply #3 on: December 25, 2011, 01:02:12 AM
This chart really needs a long explanation to understand it fully, but here is a very brief summary.

It is a chart showing the tonal ranges of the various tube colors if they were turned into a black and white chart. In other words, it is a panchromatic representation of the various colors. All the colors turned into a black and white tonal range.

It has nothing to do with the color wheel. (prismatic colors) It has all to do with the panchromatic (b/w) tonal ranges.

Notice that all of the greens and some of the blues are on the right side (a-) of the chart and all the reds and some of the blues are on the left side (a+) indicating the warm colors (left) and the cold colors (right). As an example Ultramarine Blue is a warm color while Cerulean Blue is a cold color.

All the P numbers next to the colors indicate the Universal Numbering of the different pigments. I'm not going to go into that here but check the tubes of paint in your box and you will find these numbers (or combination)  printed on the tube.

Some colors look dark to the eye yet when converted into panchromatic they are actually light in color.
This is the reason that any document of importance is always signed in black and not in blue.

Take a look at the ensignia (circular red, white and blue) on the side of a Royal Air Force plane and compare the colors of the color photograph to a black and white photograph and you will see what I mean. There is an optical tonal change between the red and the blue.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


claude

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Reply #4 on: December 25, 2011, 06:59:40 AM
Dennis, you are sooooo sexy when you talk Japanese :smart:
If not now, when? If not me, who?


dennis

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Reply #5 on: December 25, 2011, 08:58:27 AM
 :urwelcome:
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


patindaytona

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Reply #6 on: December 25, 2011, 11:48:40 AM
Got it Dennis
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


nolan

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Reply #7 on: December 26, 2011, 11:34:42 AM
Agree with Dennis on sticking with one tutor you are comfortable with as we all do things differently.

We found out the hard way - when we first started giving workshops we did them combined (both our studio students together). The one would do a demo and then we would both help the students while they painted. We quickly noticed that say Dennis would tell the student to do one thing, then I would come around a few minutes later and tell the student to do it another way.

We then split the workshops so some would come to me and others to Dennis and that was a huge success O0


patindaytona

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Reply #8 on: December 26, 2011, 06:08:45 PM
Nolan, alot of things artist's will agree on such as aerial perspective..bluer with distance, warms come forward as well as darker values, etc.  It is hard to sift thru so many things and make everything cohesive. Yet, they are ALL important it seems. More often than not, it's only AFTER i've painted that I think about it, and make notes on ...oh, i forgot to add some sky color to the top of her hair, or reflected light..When you're painting, you are thinking ALOT about how careful your arm is, and mixing up some more color, etc..and all those ideas go out the window. This is a matter of comprehension. Once you have more experience, these things won't be so much as afterthoughts I'm sure. I still think it's good practice to ADD all of them into a painting weather it's so impressionistic that it would not matter if  you put in reflected light at all......just a good habit to include and do it anyway i say.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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