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Author Topic: Bryce Canyon  (Read 747 times)

patindaytona

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on: April 02, 2017, 11:46:19 AM

As with practically every one, i lost compostion. So hard to keep that! Things start to wander. It's ok though, i learn from each one. I'm learning more now to let things go. I painted and dabbled for many hours to get this on track, but at this point it's just teetering on the brink.   No sense in fighting it more.
At least i learned more about gettting the tones better. Next painting, i'm going to improve!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


patindaytona

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Reply #1 on: April 02, 2017, 12:18:24 PM
Photos just don't do it. When i look at my paintings, they are so much better looking than a photos taken of it. It just looses so much. Probably because you're supposed to stand back, not looking at it two feet away like a photo does to it. Oh well, that good i guess.
I do everything with photography and editting and still just can't do it.
Here's a little better shot of it.

The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


stoney

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Reply #2 on: April 02, 2017, 01:56:04 PM
Each painting is preparation for the next.


EmmaLee

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Reply #3 on: April 02, 2017, 04:12:36 PM
I think this painting is just fine. I like the loose feel and the contrast of the light.
I know what you mean about paintings in the photos. Sometimes I take a photo just to see if there is something in the photo that I'm missing in person.
EmmaLee


liz

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Reply #4 on: April 02, 2017, 05:44:40 PM
 :)  I've been to Bryce National Park and your colors and shapes look like how I saw them!  You have good tonal contrasts, too, Pat!  I'm still thinking about painting Bryce one day. . .
~Liz


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: April 02, 2017, 05:57:25 PM
hello liz, thanks...you probably got my email!
Yes, the colors and the values.......at least i got those right and they are more important than anything.. I'm alot better at doing that than i was for years.  Bryce is really nice. But when you're on vacation and seeing all the parks, you don't have much time to go on the hikes...been there a few times.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Steve Weatherwax

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Reply #6 on: April 02, 2017, 06:05:07 PM
Pat,

What are you shooting with? First off, you'll need the painting to be really well lit. Then, if your shooting with something that allows you to adjust the aperture, shutter speed and ISO, you'll want to stop it down till it is about two or three stops above wide open, choose a shutter speed of 1/60th of  a second or faster and keep the ISO low...100  or 200. Also, if you can adjust the white balance, just set it to automatic. This should work fine.

Many modern cell phones will allow you to adjust these. They're not as good as an SLR or DSLR, but way better than a "Brownie". :)

Before I forget, I like your painting!  :clap: :clap: :clap:
Steve W


patindaytona

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Reply #7 on: April 02, 2017, 06:11:50 PM
Hi Steve, A Canon Mark II.
A full sensor camera on tripod
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Steve Weatherwax

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Reply #8 on: April 02, 2017, 06:26:23 PM
Great! Then you can play around with the settings. Tripod is good, too. Even better with a remote shutter release! :)
Steve W


patindaytona

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Reply #9 on: April 03, 2017, 03:58:39 AM
Steve,
Right, i use lightroom and photoshop, and color effex. I even use the HSL in lightroom where i can adjust for each individual color (like the luminance or saturation or Hue of ...........just RED alone, and so on with all other colors.
Then do very similar in photoshop with selective color, and even try neutralize whites in color effex among others
..........and STILL.........not the same.
I guess that the same reason why famous paintings are never the same on the internet. I bet they're taken super professionally.      I have tried using my flash units inside a softbox also, and that does help. Very soft light. Or bounce it off the ceilings and walls.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


Annie.

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Reply #10 on: April 03, 2017, 04:58:44 AM
Been to Bryce a couple of time.  I think you painting is a very good representation of the park.  Do more, it is very good.

Good info Steve, 1/60 and ISO 100.  Easy to remember, it was the default for film rool.

But most important Steve, Thank You.  I had registered for a intro class on photoshop and just realized I had forgoten to show up for the first week.   :hammer: :hammer:
« Last Edit: April 03, 2017, 05:00:28 AM by Annie. »
Cheers, Annie
“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.”    ― Plato


patindaytona

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Reply #11 on: April 03, 2017, 05:15:06 AM
Thanks for your comment Emmalee,
I had so many of all the other forms in it originally. I've done that too many times and end up loosing them.
Have to learn their IMPORTANCE and try to preserve them.
Steve, on the tripod it was like 2 seconds long! But sharpeness is fine..it's just the tonal dropout.
Thanks Annie.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


janet111

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Reply #12 on: May 05, 2017, 12:35:52 AM
I was confused like you , I think you're good at self adjusting, and your painting is getting better and better.


stoney

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Reply #13 on: May 10, 2017, 12:24:02 PM
If you want to look at the overall tones in a work, look at it through a piece of red cellophane.


patindaytona

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Reply #14 on: August 24, 2017, 11:41:00 AM
Thanks Janet for your encouragement...i need that!
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


 

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