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Author Topic: Very new, help with basics  (Read 3016 times)

Maryna

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on: December 09, 2011, 03:49:49 AM
Hi there, I am very new to painting, done a few acrylic paintings (my way - basic copy work - modern)
Anyway, I want to try other types of paints. And do really professional works, for I had some people asking me to do paintings for them, however I am willing to provide them with 'beginners' pieces. We all want that wow factor when producing art works.

I do have a few basic questions:
For oils: I have a wooden type pallet, it is a brownish colour, is it better to use a white one?
Do I clean my brushes with turpintine or spirits (is there a difference) what is thinners then?  :confused: 
I see that on the tulips live webinar you used a watercolour pencil to do the initial drawing, can I use another type of pencil?
Our local art supply store sells the brushes are crazy prices, does your final artwork outcome really depends on the type of brush you use?
What is better to paint on the stretch canvas or the boards?

Thanks  :blush:


"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


Kelley

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Reply #1 on: December 09, 2011, 07:50:46 AM
First,  :welcome: to PaintBasket marynamo.  You have come to the right place for answers.  Nolan and Dennis are excellent tutorial instructors and coaches. 

In my humble opinion the palette should be white unless you will be painting something light which should have a darker backdrop to contrast.

There are several methods of cleaning your brushes and at different intervals.  I use turpentine or equivalent for deeper cleaning at the end of my sessions.  Paint thinners are mediums or oils such as walnut or linseed oil used to thin the paint without removing the characteristic or quality of your paint.  You will most likely receive a further explanation from someone more advanced, but never use turpentine to thin your paint (to go on a canvas). 

The water colour pencil worked for me because the pigment (from the pencil) was absorbed into the paint.  I try to match the colour as close as I can to the area I am going to paint.  As far as the canvas or boards, it is probably just a matter of preference.  I find it easier to paint on stretched canvas because the canvas 'gives' a bit.  I would recommend a few good brushes, but I've seen artists use whatever they had on hand to paint - even tissue paper.  It depends on what you are trying to achieve I suppose.

Hope this was helpful.
Kelley


dennis

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Reply #2 on: December 09, 2011, 10:06:43 AM
Marynamo, I will be starting a new series of instruction from 9 January next year. It will be in watercolours and I hope to take beginners right through to master artist status. The series will be of extreme help to oil/acrylic artists as well as most of the principles I will be sharing is of importance to artists in any medium. As an introduction, the first 4 lessons will be free. The course will take place during the whole of next year.
You are what you THINK about - Napoleon Hill


nolan

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Reply #3 on: December 09, 2011, 12:42:27 PM
You can use a white or toned palette, it doesn't matter. I use a white tile. It is however important to check your mix against the area on the canvas where you are going to use it as, no matter what palette you use, the colour will look different on the palette to where it will finally be used. The reason for this is that on the palette the surrounding colour will be, eg., white, but on the canvas it may be green or pink, etc.

I use turps to clean my brush in oils. Thinners that you buy at the hardware store is not used at all. You do however use a medium to thin down your paints - like Linseed oil or one of the specialist mediums like Liquin.

The watercolour pencil is made of the same pigment as your paints and comes in a variety of colours that is why I use them. The idea is to reduce the amount of lines showing through in the final painting, so you could use any pencil if you wanted to. You may then just end up with a final painting where you can see your construction lines shining through the paint.

Hope that helps  :)


Maryna

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Reply #4 on: December 09, 2011, 08:11:33 PM
Thank you so much for the feedback.

Dennis I marked the Watercolour course in my diary, can't wait!  :)
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


patindaytona

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Reply #5 on: December 11, 2011, 05:11:03 AM
Nolan, I use the Distilled Turp from a hardware store. Isn't that fine for cleaning brushes? Maybe you meant that it's not used at all for the actual painting process.
The moment you find yourself mostly satisfied with a painting and think you'll "just quickly" do this or that, that's the moment to stop completely. Take the painting off your easel and put it aside for at least 24 hours, then reassess whether it really needs that tweak.


claude

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Reply #6 on: December 11, 2011, 05:51:35 AM
Marynamo, I will be starting a new series of instruction from 9 January next year. It will be in watercolours and I hope to take beginners right through to master artist status. The series will be of extreme help to oil/acrylic artists as well as most of the principles I will be sharing is of importance to artists in any medium. As an introduction, the first 4 lessons will be free. The course will take place during the whole of next year.

Dennis, Santa called, he's waiting to finish Claude's gift list. All that is missing is the supplies for that W/C class. Don't want to rush you but rumour has it that Christmas is dec 25th this year!!!
If not now, when? If not me, who?


Maryna

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Reply #7 on: December 11, 2011, 06:33:11 AM
 :2funny: you are so funny Claude, actually just spoke to my mom on the phone and she asked about gifts I want, next week is my b/day aswell, I had a list of all the art supplies and she went silent for a moment and then said "don't think you are funny."

I would loooovveeeee to add some art goodies in my stocking, even if I have to make up a prezzie to me from me  :yippee:
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


C.Bodine

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Reply #8 on: December 11, 2011, 06:51:50 AM
Maryna, My birthday is the 23rd!  :)

The only thing on my lit is art supplies.
Christina


Maryna

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Reply #9 on: December 11, 2011, 08:06:26 AM
That is excellent, happy birthday if I forget, hope I remember. All the great people celebrate their birthdays in December  ;)

I also have only art supplies on my list, just hope everyone catch on (family) lol  :2funny:
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


claude

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Reply #10 on: December 11, 2011, 08:36:11 AM
Here is a good trick. I make a liste:

One Kubota tractor (20 000$)
One Lamborghini (200 000$)
One vacation in Costa Rica (6 000$)
One week with Demi Moore (mucho $)
Art supplies (from 5$ up)

Guess what I get?

Never failed yet.
If not now, when? If not me, who?


Maryna

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Reply #11 on: December 11, 2011, 08:48:43 AM
 :2funny:
"It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see"


nolan

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Reply #12 on: December 11, 2011, 12:21:18 PM
 ;D Claude

Pat I was referring to thinners that you buy at the hardware store in South Africa that is not used in oil painting. Turpentine bought from the hardware store is perfect for cleaning brushes O0


 

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